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Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ex-library book. The item shows wear from consistent use, but it remains in good condition and works perfectly. All pages and cover are intact (including the dust cover, if applicable). Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting.
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Fox Bunny Funny Paperback – July 10, 2007

4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

This wordless story has three distinct parts. First, a perhaps middle-school-aged, suburban fox-boy carefully pedals about town on his bike with a sack whose contents he keeps secret from neighbors' and parents' prying eyes. The punch-panel of this episode, in which the fox-boy dons a rabbit suit, surely refers to a young man's experimentation with cross-dressing. In the second episode, the fox-boy goes to the equivalent of Boy Scout camp, where he suffers from having to keep his identification with rabbits hidden from peers and counselors. When discovered, however, he turns on a rabbit and makes a species-correct meal choice. In the final part, the fox is now a young man trying hard to present his fox identity. When he discovers a city where foxes and rabbits amicably coexist, he faints, is whisked to a hospital, and undergoes an operation to conform his presenting biology to his inner rabbit. Deftly presented in crisp black-and-white, block-print-like panels, this is a must for libraries supporting LGBT collections. Goldsmith, Francisca
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 104 pages
  • Publisher: Top Shelf Productions (July 10, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 189183097X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1891830976
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.5 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,382,050 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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This is not a fuzzy-wuzzy comic book. It's not something to give your kids when they're done with their latest issue of Donald Duck Goes To Happyland.

This is hardcore, down-and-dirty, mess-with-your-head weirdness.

And we can all thank Hartzell he took the effort to make it for us.

Andy's a talented guy; there's no escaping that. His earlier works, from the "Edna" series to his weighty "Monday," demonstrated his talent in both storytelling and pure art. His capability to lambaste the reader with emotion, using only line drawings, is remarkable.

And, like "Monday," "FBF" deals with weighty subjects...and doesn't use words.

Okay, for most writers, this would be a brutal undertaking-- punishment of the worst sort. "You want me to deal with WHAT? Without using any WORDS???"

But Hartzell can not only do it, he does it with a stark simplicity that probably conducts fear, horror, hatred, joy, and happiness better than prose can do...or has done.

FBF deals with The Other in a society; the easiest analogies are right there in front of you, barely hidden by the symbolism...but I think there are deeper, more universal feelings there, too. Can a character with a different agenda from those in a shared society, a character with an affinity for the taboo, subliminate its own needs for the sake of fitting in? And how far does that carry? And what else is there?

Hartzell goes at these questions with an ink pen that could be a metaphorical sledgehammer.

Let him hit you in the forehead. It's worth it.
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Format: Paperback
I actually read this book in electronic format in Comixology.

This is a short silent allegorical graphic novel that deals with the subject of being different, feeling different, and not fitting in with your family or peer group. You were born with a gender but since your childhood felt that you are the opposite gender. You were born with a specific sexual orientation that is not "straight". You were born within a religious group that you struggle to fit in. You were born within a family of high-end professionals who wanted you to be like them, but you feel that you are a different sort of person. The examples could multiply to the infinite. Fox Bunny Funny depicts all of them masterly. In a way, this is a modern Aesop-sort-of fable, the lack of moral about who you are might be the moral of the story.

I love the cute drawing, which goes from the merely cute children cartoon style, to the not so childish childlike gory, to the trippy and almost psychedelic images at the end of the book. I love the overall humour of the author, and the imagination displayed in the conception of the world of rabbits, the world of foxes, and the mixed world. I found very inventive the shot guns that the foxes use, the church of the rabbits, the somewhat "depraved" and "subverted" mixed world at the end. There are many graphic elements that I considered inventive and humorous, and put a smile on my face.

The book is silent. However, the action and the expressiveness of the characters speak loudly. Being able to speaking to everybody without words is just something difficult to achieve. On the other hand, there is much more to silent books than the specific explicit message drawn by the author.
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Format: Paperback
A beautiful and evocative visual story. Metaphorically deep and accessible to a wide age range. Highly recommended.
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