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Freaky Green Eyes Paperback – September 2, 2003

4.2 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Joyce Carol Oates is a recipient of the National Medal of Humanities, the National Book Critics Circle Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award, the Chicago Tribune Lifetime Achievement Award, the National Book Award, and the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in Short Fiction, and has been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. She has written some of the most enduring fiction of our time, including the national bestsellers We Were the Mulvaneys; Blonde, which was nominated for the National Book Award; and the New York Times bestseller The Accursed. She is the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Princeton University and has been a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters since 1978.

From Booklist

Gr. 7-10. Freaky Green Eyes is the name 15-year-old Franky gives to her stronger self, the part that has to deal with the enigma that is her parents' relationship. With a nod to the O. J. Simpson case, Oates pulls readers into a fast-paced, first-person thriller that begins when Franky's mother, an artist, begins spending alone time at her cabin. It's immediately clear that her situation isn't idyllic; Franky's father, former football hero and popular sportscaster Reid Pierson, is calling the shots as to when his wife can come and go. There's no nuance to Reid's character. He's a charming, controlling bully who rules his family; should his will be thwarted, he gets physical. When Mrs. Pierson and a male friend disappear, there's also no mystery about who's behind the abduction; the clues, if that's what they are meant to be, are awkwardly dropped. Yet what could have been a predictable plot in the hands of a less-experienced writer becomes an absorbing page-turner as Franky slowly lets herself accept the violence that has always been in her family and finds the courage to stand up to her father. Ilene Cooper
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; First Edition edition (September 2, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0066237572
  • ISBN-13: 978-0066237572
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 5 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,062,874 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
this is the best book i've read in a lonnng time. Just like the cover says, it does haunt you long after the last page. francesca's alter ego, freaky green eyes, knows the truth, the truth that francesca does not want to know. The whole book you can tell that francesca's dad is a little scary, through his intolerance, abuse, and something else that is reflected in Oates writing. this is a mix of a coming to age story, and a mystery. it is the only mystery book i've read where the main character actually goes into artistic detail about her feelings. Buy this book and you won't be dissapointed.
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Format: Hardcover
From the moment i started this book, it put a death grip on my mind and didn't let go until i finished it! This book raised some real issues and haunted me soooo ong after i finished the last page. I admit,i cryed hard. This book was thick wth emotion: sadness, tension, fear, hope, love, and hate. I reccomend this book to anyone over 13 but i am warning any reader or potential reader- YOU WILL THINK ABOUT THIS BOOK LONG AFTER YOU FINISH IT...IT IS VERY SAD!!
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Format: Hardcover
The introduction to Freaky Green Eyes by Joyce Carol Oates is very catchy. It leads you into the book without you wanting to put in down, and the ending makes you never want it to end. This book would mostly attract girls that like books full of real-life events. For example, in this book it talks about school, death, and divorce. These things could really happen, which is what I loved about the book. Freaky Green Eyes is about a girl named Franky with a famous, but violent father. When her mother starts leaving the house, she knows something is wrong. After, awhile her mother turns up missing, and finds her journal. Through reading this diary, she soon learns there is more to the story than just her mother leaving. My favorite part of the book is how there are so many details. Joyce Carol Oates does a very good job with keeping the story a mystery until the very end. The problem with the descriptivness is that she doesn't really leave anything to the imagination. If you are looking for a great, mysterious book that keeps you reading, this is the book for you. It takes you on a wonderful adventure that you will never forget. When I started reading this book I got into it, and didn't even notice how many pages I was reading. Unlike many books I have read, this one kept me intrested thoughout the whole book.
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Format: Paperback
Why, oh why is so much "young adult" literature filled with trauma? I am a middle school teacher who reads a lot of YA novels to find good ones to recommend to my students. I will not be recommending this one. I don't know anyone who has had a life like Oates' heroine Franky. In the first few pages, she narrowly escapes a rape. She then goes on to suffer an abusive father and then the forced estrangement from and eventual murder of her mother! I wonder what kind of world Oates lives in to make this be what she wants to communicate. A second factor in my strong reservations about this book is the very anti-male world Oates creates. From the near rapist at the beginning, to the abusive father throughout, to Franky's cruel older brother (who reamins a threat to her aunt even at the very end), to the boys who capture and terrorize wild animals in the middle, to the lying attorney towards the end, the males in this book are almost all dangerous and untrustworthy. One nice man, who is gay, is murdered, and one boy seems possibly nice at the very end of the novel. That was not enough to overcome what seemed too anti-male for me. I will put this on my classroom shelf without fanfare, and if I know someone who needs to see how to deal with abuse or know she's not alone, I will guide him or her to this book (as well as do much more, I would hope!). But for my average readers, who are all unique individuals and all have typical teenage lives, with their own angst and drama and struggle to figure out who they are, this is not enlightening, inspiring, moving, entertaining, or even very helpful.
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By A Customer on March 18, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Joyce Carol Oates has far surpassed her first young adult novel, Big Mouth and Ugly Girl, with Freaky Green Eyes. I loved this novel and couldn't put it down. As a high school English teacher, I've recommended it to several students and word of mouth has spread--everyone can't wait to read Freaky Green Eyes.
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Format: Paperback
I thought this book sounded really interesting from the synopsis. Alter ego? Missing parent? Sounds like a good story set up. Unfortunately, I was fooled. I really didn't care for this book, even from disc 1, but I kept on trucking.

I thought Freaky was going to be almost like a different personality, like Franky was going to be someone else, but really, Freaky is sort of the voice of reason and smart aleck comments inside Franky's head. There wasn't anything exciting about Freaky, now the book. While the book as a whole is well-written, there are no surprises or twists. Everything is exactly what it looks like.

This book deals a lot with physical abuse, which is a horrible, horrible thing, and I didn't not like the book due to what it dealt with because I gave Split a 5 star review and it was much more detailed than any abuse in this book; I just didn't care much for a lot of this book, not just the subject matter. Franky was a character I couldn't connect with or empathize with. It seemed like from her point, it was okay that her mother was abused, and even a few times she said that if her mom would act right, she wouldn't be abused. So she is saying her mother deserves being beaten? Franky is the perfect candidate for a battered wife later in life.

This is one of my least favorite audiobooks, too. The narrator didn't do badly, but aside from her reading kind of slow and her pauses being too long, I could hear a bunch of thumps and bumps in the background through the entire book. There was even a couple of times I thought there was something wrong with my car (I listen while I drive) and it drove me crazy. The only parts I did kind of like were the two police interviews.
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