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Comment: Dust Cover Missing. This book has a light amount of wear to the pages, cover and binding. Blue Cloud Books. Hot deals from the land of the sun.
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Frederick (German) Hardcover – 2006

3.4 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 2006
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Beltz GmbH, Julius (2006)
  • Language: German
  • ISBN-10: 3407730063
  • ISBN-13: 978-3407730060
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,398,135 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By Reflection Haiku on October 3, 2010
Format: Hardcover
A marvel mouse masterpiece to introduce young readers to poetry, FREDERICK illustrated how a poet works and what poetry can do for a community in a story when other mouselings gather food for the winter, he gather food for thoughts. Seemingly lazy and doing nothing, Frederick collects sunshine, colors and words for he foresees winter is cold, dark and long. His friends question about his idleness but remain courteous. Frederick holds firm in his post for he knows both roles that attend to physical and spiritual needs are vital for their survival. When the bleak season comes and they all share the crops together and when all the food is gone, it is Frederick's turn to make his contribution. He helps his friends use imagination to stay warm, remember the picturesque spring days and cheer them up with his poem, full of humor and splendor that young readers will be delighted to hear. Frederick is also available in DVD format which the animated pictures will further bring this Caldecott Honor winning fable to life.

Swimmy... and More Classic Leo Lionni Stories (Scholastic Video Collection)
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Format: Hardcover
I checked this out from the library for my son and we both loved it. It has the excellent message that the gift of prose and poetry is just as useful as gathering grains, both are important to our sustinance, both physically and emotionally.

As for Garth Williams review, I feel pity for you because you're a sad person who has to overanalyse a children's story because it doesn't play exactly into your dogma. Tell you what, look back at your life and see how many instances there are in your life where music, poetry, literature or the arts brought you any sort of joy or peace. I bet there's more than a few and basically what you're pathetically trying to do is bad mouth anyone who writes or creates something that brings something special to anyone's life. I noticed there's little creativity in your review so I'm guessing you don't do anything artistically meaningful in your life. As someone who does, I feel truly sorry for your narrow view of the life experience.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I never got the book here. It was very.disappointing. I got something else
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Format: Paperback
Have you noticed that all of Leo Leonni's books are about small animals and illustrated from the point of view of those small animals?
This could be because children see high windows, high doorknobs, and high furnture, and Lionni empathizes with their plight.

Every time I read this book, I get chocked up and tears start to run down my face.
Then the children look at me like I'm crazy.
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Format: Hardcover
This is the anti-Aesop fable.
Frederick is about a mouse who, like Aesop's grasshopper, is too lazy to help the other mice prepare for winter. Instead he sits around and daydreams. When asked by the other mice who are busy working why he won't help them, he comes up with nonsensical excuses. Somehow the other mice tolerate his lack of contribution and when winter comes they actually share with him the food they worked so hard to store up.
Because Frederick refuses to help gather food, they run out of it before winter's end and begin to get hungry. It is then that Frederick offers his own contribution such as describing colors he had "collected" while they had been collecting food. Rather than throw his lazy butt out of the nest, the other mice marvel at his gifts and praise him for doing his part.
The author of the book obviously sides with the new-age, artsy little mouse and attempts to preach to his readers by this parable that industry is bad and we should instead sit around and contemplate the wonders of the world. (A world created not by God of course but by others like ourselves - whatever that's supposed to mean)
The philosophy of this preachy little tome is against everything that made our country great - hard work, creating wealth, self-sacrifice, not living just for today but planning for tomorrow, and recognizing something greater (God) than ourselves.
We were given this book by a (very liberal) relative of ours who had read it many times to their kids (ensuring future Liberal Arts majors). I read it once and immediately threw it in the garbage. I'll stick with Aesop thank you very much.
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