Kindle Price: $11.99

Save $4.01 (25%)

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Two Fronts (The War That Came Early, Book Five) by [Turtledove, Harry]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

Two Fronts (The War That Came Early, Book Five) Kindle Edition

3.5 out of 5 stars 104 customer reviews

See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$11.99

Length: 417 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Audible Narration:
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration with Whispersync for Voice. Add narration for a reduced price of $4.99 when you buy the Kindle book.
Ready

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Turtledove’s new variation on the theme of WWII is departing more and more from the original, sometimes in subtle ways (the Tiger tank is the Mark V instead of the Mark VI) and sometimes in less subtle ones (Sergeant Fujita flies on missions to drop bacteriological weapons on Hawaii, making life uneasy for marine Pete McGill, and Herb Druse gets a certain research project in Tennessee canceled). The lot of the poor bloody infantrymen, however, does not change—it’s still miserable, and for Wilhelm Deming, fatal. Meanwhile, British sergeant Walsh, French lieutenant Demange, and Czech sniper Vaclav Havacek are still full of fight, the first two on a French front bolstered by lend-lease supplies and the third in Spain. Hans Rudel continues to enjoy a charmed life in his tank-busting Stuka, while Julius Lemp takes his U-30 into Arctic waters, where he unbolts his record by sinking a British aircraft carrier. The real pressure for an explosion is building up in Germany, as dissatisfaction with the progress (or regress) of the war is building. The center of the dissent is in Münster, where newly widowed Sarah Bruck is dealing with it up close and personal and finding that not all Germans think of Jews as untermenschen. What’s next is anybody’s guess, except that it will almost certainly be more surprises. --Roland Green

Review

Praise for Two Fronts
 
“[Harry] Turtledove has another major twist in store for the readers and his alternative world.”SF Site
 
“Turtledove’s new variation on the theme of WWII is departing more and more from the original, sometimes in subtle ways and sometimes in less subtle ones. . . . What’s next is anybody’s guess, except that it will almost certainly be more surprises.”Booklist
           
“Turtledove is the standard-bearer for alternate history.”USA Today

Praise for Harry Turtledove
 
“If you like alternate histories, you’re going to like this series a lot.”—The San Diego Union-Tribune
 
“Turtledove is the standard-bearer for alternate history.”USA Today
 
Coup d’Etat
 
“This is what alternative history is all about.”Historical Novel Society
 
The Big Switch
 
“The Hugo Award winner continues to delight in exploring the world of ‘what if?’”Library Journal
 
West and East
 
“There’s plenty to satisfy fans of military strategy, tactics, and armaments.”Publishers Weekly
 
Hitler’s War
 
“Turtledove is always good, but this return to World War II . . . is genuinely brilliant. . . . The characterizations in particular bring the book to extraordinary life.”Booklist


From the Hardcover edition.

Product Details

  • File Size: 4534 KB
  • Print Length: 417 pages
  • Publisher: Del Rey (July 23, 2013)
  • Publication Date: July 23, 2013
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00B6OVQZW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #113,189 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Sadly the high hopes I had for this series when the first novel came out have diminished with each new novel. Turtledove's writing has in the past been quite repetitive in previous series but "The War that Came Early" series and Two Fronts in particular take this repetition to new heights. No longer content with merely repeating certain similar phrases or subjects, in Two Fronts Turtledove replicates entire paragraphs almost exactly, from earlier in the series and within the book itself. Most readers would agree that he would be better served advancing the plot as opposed to repeatedly discussing the same topic: the Stukas and Russian bombers were outclassed by modern fighters; that anti-tank rifles made fantastic sniper rifles. The character of the Czech sniper's story is almost reduced to a version of wack-a-mole, with no drama whatsoever.

Here's hoping that the wheels start turning in book 6.
1 Comment 31 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm beginning to think that Turtledove has tried to make a feast out of a light snack. The idea of World War II starting up early, before either side was really prepared for it, was a good one. But I'm beginning to see that without major, MAJOR twists to the timeline, it doesn't seem to have much potential for an ongoing series.

This is book five in the "The War That Came Early" series and really, that series should have ended at around book three. Book four tried to produce the major twist to the timeline by having England and France ally with Germany, but by the end of that book, the twist was undone and there were no real consequences. That book could have been skipped entirely without really missing much of anything.

Sadly, so can this one, or at least about 95% of it can. If you want to know what happens, I'll tell you: one character dies and gets replaced by another, something bad happens in Hawaii (though even that gets brushed aside as more annoying than anything else), and...that's about it. There's no real character development, which while not unusual for a Turtledove story, is particularly notable here. Almost every single character is the same place (mentally, physically and emotionally), at the end of the book as they are at the start.

And really, that's the problem with the series as a whole at this point. Nothing really HAPPENED in this book. Oh, there were plenty of scenes and lots of battles, and of course Turtledove's problem of telling you the same thing constantly, as well as his problems with telling you the same thing repeatedly, and his problems with constantly giving you information you have already, but there wasn't much plot.
Read more ›
1 Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The fifth volume in Harry Turtledove's "The War That Came Early" series begins with the two sides dealing with the aftermath of the reversal of the "Big Switch" in the last volume. With Britain and France having resumed their war against Nazi Germany, the German leadership finds themselves facing a drawn-out two-front war with no end in sight. Yet the situation for the British and French is no less complicated, as they prefer to wage a bombing campaign to the bloody and politically dangerous alternative of a ground offensive. Meanwhile, the United States finds itself on the defensive in the Pacific, with Japan deploying a dangerous new weapon in their effort to maintain their hold on their enlarged empire.

The entries in Turtledove's ongoing series seem to alternate between torpidness and something that amounts to a crawl. With the end of the series (and presumably the war) in sight, this volume definitely fits in the latter category; the pace is greater than that of the previous entry, Coup d'Etat (The War That Came Early, Book Four), and some interesting events do take place. That being said, Turtledove still has not addressed the problems with the repetitiveness of the writing and the similarity of perspectives offered by the selection of the characters. Were they better fleshed out this might not matter as much, but the result is a book that mostly offers multiple viewpoints from the perspective of the grunts, which with Turtledove's writing usually means much of the same, regardless of the side.
2 Comments 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have been a fan of Harry Turtledove since The Guns of The South, and even I have to say this book is as dull as watching paint dry. He is good at describing battle scenes generally, but here you get the impression that he's being paid by the word. If I had a sip of beer every time he used the word "beast," I'd be passed-out drunk.

The thing that bothers me is how he avoids drama. The Japanese drop germ bombs on Hawaii. Is there panic as people start dying of the Plague? Nope. It's brushed off in two pages with mandatory vaccinations. Pfft. Even I could write better than that. He did the same thing in the last book, by completely avoiding telling how the pro-Fascists in London were overthrown. One day they're with Hitler, and the next, they aren't. Yawn. Next!

He did better with the Timeline-191 series, because it was at least dramatic and didn't shy away from telling a larger story. But this series has become downright boring, and--I hate to say this--not worth reading.

Seriously, it's simply a drawn-out soap opera. Will Peggy become an alcoholic? Will Chaim ever have sex with the Communist cutie again? Will anybody shoot Awful Arno in the back? Tune in next time for As The World War Turns---at $35 an episode.

As Chaim might have said, "Feh! Who needs it?"
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Two Fronts (The War That Came Early, Book Five)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Two Fronts (The War That Came Early, Book Five)