Lyft Industrial Deals Beauty Best Books of the Month Shop new men's suiting nav_sap_hiltonhonors_launch Learn more about Amazon Music Unlimited Get 10% cashback on thousands of musical instruments with your Amazon.com Store Credit Card Starting at $39.99 Grocery Handmade Tote Bags Home Gift Guide Off to College Home Gift Guide Book a house cleaner for 2 or more hours on Amazon Transparent Transparent Transparent  Introducing Echo Show Introducing All-New Fire HD 10 with Alexa hands-free $149.99 Kindle Oasis, unlike any Kindle you've ever held Trade in. Get paid. Go shopping. Shop Now ToyHW17_gno



There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Showing 1-10 of 10 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 16 reviews
on May 11, 2012
Ed Sanders is a polymath who has worked in poetry, music, prank and activism. Last year, I ready his poetry epic 1968, which tells the history of that strange year in compelling verse. In Fug You, Sanders offers a treasure chest of stories, portraits of famous artists, jokes and deep insight into the political struggles of the time. Anyone interested in the mini-Renaissance in New York's East Village will find this a delightful companion to Patti Smith's JUST KIDS. It's smart, witty and cantankerous without falling into maudlin nostalgia. Edward Sanders offers the kind of offbeat insight that is all too rare in memoirs. he doesn't take himself too seriously and the magic of place and time is conjured with all the beauty one would expect from a Minstrel Yippie. Don't miss out on this one!
0Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on August 26, 2017
A great glimpse inside a long lost era. Sanders never lets you down, and the Fugs story is one of rock's most intriguing
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on March 15, 2014
Ed Sanders was the genius behind the Fugs, a folk-rock ensemble inseparable from the so-called "filthy speech movement." He's an interesting guy in his own right, if more obsessed with sex than is always comfortable (though consider the repressive mentality of his era). He was/is also a peacenik, but in the most naive fashion imaginable. As one critic, possibly Dorothy Parker, once said of someone else's book, "the covers are too far apart," but for anyone interested in the beatnik-early hippie period of popular culture, this may be an essential artifact.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on July 24, 2017
See the Review of Tale of Beatnik Glory. They sort of blended together for me.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on November 4, 2013
I wish the book would have been much lengthier, but it gives a great overview of the origins of the East Coast beatnik movement and its metamorphosis into the hippie movement, which I think, in retrospect, was a lot more genuine than what emerged on the West Coast.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on September 12, 2017
super
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on August 10, 2015
I give this just 3 stars because I want to read so much more about Mr. Sanders' life. I hope he writes about his life from 1970 to the present and I would give both volumes 5 stars.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on April 27, 2012
It is said that anyone who claims to remember the 60's wasn't really there. Sanders was there and remembers a lot. His book skips across the decade dropping in on memorable people and places like a real world Forrest Gump. We meet Alan Ginsberg, the Living Theater, Andy Warhol, Jack Kerouac, Abbie Hoffman, to name just a few. Unfortunately, Sanders provides about as much explication or reflection along the way as his cinematic doppelganger. Worse, the stories tend to repeat like a bad trip. Ed Sanders was no mere eye-witness; he was a central player in the decade's momentous culture wars. I expected something more profound.
11 comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on January 3, 2013
This book was boring which surprised me because its an interesting subject and a very interesting time to write about.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on May 10, 2012
He strains way too hard for cultural and political significance and falls far, far short. And he loses the personal element, which could have redeemed it, in the process. This is an object lesson in how public celebrity can be so damaging to people.

I suppose this is enlightening to those of us who fell for this bogus potty-mouthed sassiness at the time. It's enlightening to see how empty and worthless it all was.

If you didn't have any friends, or a life, then I guess listening to "It Crawled Into My Hand" while sitting alone in your room stoned on pot and grinning at how naughty you were, I guess this could serve as some kind of consolation. But it's even more obvious just what a fraudulent step down the primrose path of second-hand living that culture, high or low, offers.

You'll notice that Sanders left the oh-so-sassy-and-happenin' city and moved out to the beautiful, living-world country, i.e., Woodstock. That should tell you just how substantial and nurturing all this radical-politics and egg-headed high culture really is.
55 comments| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse