Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$3.05
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Best-Book-Depot
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Like New. May have shelf wear or remainder mark or small inscription. Prompt shipping and great customer service.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Fugitive Days: Memoirs of an Anti-War Activist Paperback – Bargain Price, November 5, 2008

2.9 out of 5 stars 32 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, Bargain Price, November 5, 2008
$3.07 $3.05

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Editorial Reviews

Review

A fascinating memoir...distinct, original. ("The Washington Post Book World") Ayers' powerful, morally charged account of a life and a society in the political balance is provocative reading. ("Chicago Tribune")

About the Author

William Ayers is a long-time teacher and activist, award-winning education writer and reformer, and professor at the University of Illinois. He and his wife, Bernardine Dohrn, live in Chicago.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Beacon Press; 1 edition (November 5, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807032778
  • ASIN: B002RAR2M0
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,461,259 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Steve Schwartz, Austin VINE VOICE on April 25, 2011
Format: Paperback
I'm going to try to review this book as a book, rather than as a political document, although it certainly has a political point of view.

However, in the interests of openness, I'm on the left politically. I was a grad student at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor at the time, so I had a local view of the Weather Underground, and I must say I found them to be crazy dangerous. Furthermore, they were worse than useless. They accomplished nothing but the destruction and the discredit of the anti-war left. What ended the Viet Nam War was not the Weathermen's bombs, but a steady, relentless weariness, an increasing American body count, a relentless procession of peaceful protest, and plain old persuasion, not to mention the cynical (if not treasonous) manipulations of Nixon and Kissinger.

All that said, how good is the book? I found it tedious, mainly because Ayers came across to me as an egotist in the guise of a Principled Man. If he had patted himself on the back any harder, his arms would have grown longer. If he had made any more excuses for himself, he could have joined the recent Bush administration.

Ayers probably considers himself a good writer. I found the prose a knockoff of Hunter S. Thompson, a real writer. Ayers makes the common mistake of thinking he can put on a style like he puts on a suit. Genuine style reflects a genuine, personal point of view. Ayers isn't as anarchic as Thompson. His vision is far more orderly. He doesn't like chaos. Gonzo doesn't really fit him. Furthermore, some of the sentences are just bad, with phrase after phrase hanging off the end (like this sentence, for example).

Then there are the harangues against society. Oh, if only people could see our ills as clearly as Ayers does! Actually, people do, and they lose his self-congratulation about it.

Again, I probably agree with many of Ayers's views. However, I don't find this a particularly insightful book.
1 Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By CPIMCIRM on December 13, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was expecting a review of the 1960's from a bitter radical's unchanged viewpoint. I was surprised to find this book to be a thought provoking, insightful, and reflective account of the what went right and what went wrong in the portion(s) of the anti-war movement Mr. Ayers was involved in--specifically the Weather underground. This is NOT another rehash of the 60's memoir. If you have been wondering what all the fuss about Bill Ayers has been, read this book. You too might be surprised!
3 Comments 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The author and the rest of the Weather"men"/Underground were about as far from anti-war activists as you can get. They were/are petty bourgeios ultraleft adventurists who colluded with the FBI to conduct a campaign of domestic terrorism and thus justify that loathsome government body's violent repression of legitimate activists. It's too bad the entire counter-revolutionary Weathermen clique didn't perish in the townhouse explosion.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
We were assigned this book for a class on the 1960's and the Vietnam War by a professor of mine. Overall I found the book a fascinating read with an exciting fast paced writing style. It is however, a book that hangs in limbo between fact and fiction. It should be understood that as a personal memoir, this book will be biased to the views of the author. However, it is Ayer's writing style and insistence on hyperbole that give the book that "based on a true story" feeling you get from someone's story about "the war" or "the big one" they caught at the lake. There will be many instances where the reader will have to question whether or not to believe what is being told to them. It is because of this that the book deserves only three stars of five. Yes the book is entertaining, but it is being sold as a memoir of historical value and it lacks the credibility needed to be taken seriously as a work of non-fiction.

I definitely would not recommend this book as a resource for a true insight into 1960s activism. Instead it should be viewed as a novel that will impart upon you the mood of some of the most radical participants of the anti-war movement. I would however, recommend the book to anyone who is just looking for a good story or an interesting read.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book is not very well written. His life story is one of actions and specific happenings. But his writing style is more like a theoretical prose. He always uses metaphors and complex breakdowns of his feelings when he should just be telling the damn story. Part one is borderline pathetic. Is can be summarized as follows: A bunch of kids with no jobs decided to break a ton of windows of people who had nothing to do with the war to try to stop the war. Not a good read. Not a good story.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great read about the 60's and 70's and the rise of the different anti-government groups.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am troubled by this book, that someone can admit to as much as Ayers did and yet be treated as a completely normal member of a functioning society and a premier educator. I can no more comprehend his logic and self justification for his actions than I can any other modern terrorists and he seems to say that Hitler, Hussein, and other leaders are merely victims of the victors who painted them in a bad light.

It was a valuable book; I've read the Pentagon papers, Daniel Ellsberg, Malcolm X, am Saul Alinsky, so I don't consider myself politically naïve, yet the logic is mind boggling. I also am constantly amazed by the complete lack of sensitivity to other social and political issues that plague society besides peace and civil rights.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews