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The Fury (Deluxe Edition) Enhanced, Soundtrack

4.7 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Enhanced, Soundtrack, April 30, 2002
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Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Main Title
  2. For Gillian
  3. Vision on the Stairs
  4. Hester's Theme and the House
  5. Gillian's Escape
  6. The Search for Robin
  7. Death on the Carousel [Original Version]
  8. Gillian's Vision
  9. Death on the Carousel and End Titles
  10. Epilogue


Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 30, 2002)
  • Deluxe Edition edition
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Enhanced, Soundtrack
  • Label: Varèse Sarabande
  • ASIN: B000063BNL
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #754,704 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's John Williams (Composer) Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
The Fury easily ranks as John Williams most UNDERRATED work. It's haunting feel is unlike any other film soundtrack, and ranks (in my opinion), one of his top 5, if not his best (and that is saying ALOT). My only complaint is that the entire score is currently not available. Regardless, buy this... a MUST for any fan of John Williams, or music itself.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
In the late 1970's, director Brian De Palma was riding high off his success with the Stephen King supernatural thriller CARRIE, so it was natural that his follow-up film would be in a similar vein. Composer John Williams was also riding high off his success at the time thanks to both his Oscar-winning score for STAR WARS and having recently done CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND, and would go on to achieve even more great success in 1978 with SUPERMAN. Together, the two men collaborated on THE FURY released earlier that year. Based on the novel by John Farris (who also wrote the screenplay), the story involves Kirk Douglas going after a devious government agent (John Cassavetes) who kidnapped his psychic-powered son (Andrew Stevens) for nefarious means and is aided by a girl named Gillian with those same abilities (Amy Irving) to help track them down. Though I don't think it's a classic, I find it entertaining in a lurid way due to some solid direction, a pretty memorable finale and of course Williams' score, which is the film's finest asset (even legendary film critic Pauline Kael gave it some props).

When scoring the film, the only directive Williams was given by De Palma was to emulate the spirit of the great Bernard Herrmann (who had just passed away a few years prior) and Williams takes inspiration from three particular scores of that composer: VERTIGO, PSYCHO, and SISTERS. The memorable main theme, with its Herrmann-style tragedy, is first heard in the "Main Title" on woodwinds before building with brass and finishing with pounding timpani. It is heavily used throughout and is heard in both overt and subtle guises.
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Format: Audio CD
Like Williams's score to "Jane Eyre" and "Dracula," his music for "The Fury" deserves the re-mastered, full-length version. Several musical cues from the film are missing, indicative of the then common practice of releasing partial soundtracks due to the perception that movie score fans are an "insignificant" lot.

Thankfully, aficionados of film scoring have grown tremendously and "The Fury" ranks as a forgotten gem from one of the premier composers of the past forty years, a muscian with the awards to prove it.

Hopefully, a new version is in the works; but, until that time arrives, those that appreciate good scores will have to settle for this "truncated" release.
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Format: Audio CD
A good film composer can write a score that you will enjoy for a film that you will not. John Williams is a good film composer, and that is the case here. This film is not particularly to my taste, but the music certainly is. It is a gem of a film score that has not been accorded the attention which it deserves. It well rewards the listener.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
the music for this over the top but entertaining film adaptation of "The Fury" in 1978. He was just hot off his successes from both "Star Wars" and "Close Encounters"
at the time. While his music from "Star Wars" may have been a tip of the hat to Korngold, he was approached by Brian de Palma to score this film in the style of Bernard Herrmann who had recently died.
Williams did use some characteristics of the Herrmann sound and improved upon them which
resulted in the creation of a rich and dark musical landscape, a "symphony macabre" so to speak and this is, in my opinion, one of Williams' best musical works. As this is the great re-recording with the London Symphony Orchestra and not the original soundtrack sessions I could only say that I wish the composer had redone the whole score, its just that good. The opening title music is very reminiscent of
Herrmann with the ascending/descending triadic figure for low woodwinds punctuated by strings and tympani, a highlight from start to finish as is this whole recording.
As much as I enjoy the composer's lyrical writing ("For Gillian") it is the darker
action passages that really form the spine of the score in this recording. The cues
"Gillian's Escape" and "Gillian's Vision" are true standouts here. Much of this music may seem melodramatic to some but for me it is music at some of its most powerful. Williams has never really scored horror with the exception of "Dracula" the following year but with "The Fury" he definitely proved he had the chops for it.
This film was made at the time when both Williams and Jerry Goldsmith were the two
most in demand composers in Hollywood and many great scores came from them in just that one year alone.
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Format: Audio CD
The year was 1978 and "Star Wars" opened less than a year before. Williams had two very impressive scores the previous year and won the Oscar for "Star Wars" although many would argue at the time his score for "Close Encounters" was just as brilliant. However, it was his score for "The Fury" which opened many people's eyes that John Williams had arrived. Even Pauline Kael in her review of Brian DePalma's film was impressed calling his work the greatest score she had ever heard for any horror movie. Having such a great experience the year before, Williams returned to London and recorded the soundtrack with the LSO. Even more impressive, the original track, "Epilogue" meant to be used over the closing titles was scrapped by DePalma as being too long. He used a different track instead which didn't appear on the album (now on CD). In producing the LP, Williams included the original track and so gave us a glimpse into the mind of a genius. I would compare "Epilogue" to Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings in its construct - how it builds with the strings taking over the melody and going higher and higher in pitch until they crescendo in a glorious climatic finish. Having studied Williams' work over a lifetime of devotion to his craft, I can assure you it rarely gets better than this. Williams along with Alfred Newman and Bernard Herrmann is in a class by himself. While so many of his works are simply superior to just about any contemporary composer in his field, you couldn't go wrong to buy this or practically any soundtrack composed by John Williams.

Recommended scores by Williams: Jaws, Star Wars (all six films), ET, Raiders of the Lost Arc (all four films), Dracula, Superman (1978), Schindler's List, Hook, War Horse, The Tourist, Witches of Eastwick, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (first two in series), and Lincoln (I've missed several... sorry)
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