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{GETTING MORE} BY Diamond, Stuart (Author )Getting More: How to Negotiate to Achieve Your Goals in the Real World(Hardcover) Unknown Binding – December 28, 2010

4.6 out of 5 stars 342 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Hardcover (December 28, 2010)
  • ASIN: B008547E3Y
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (342 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
It seems acceptable for 'Getting More' groupies to copy their reviews of one edition of the book to another edition on this site, so I have reluctantly decided to follow suit. I now expect an urgent 5-star review, perhaps from a Penn student (who I hope has read other works on negotiation), to take the average ranking back to 5 stars.

I like this book but there are problems with it that few reviewers mention. Therefore I will focus on a range of problems in an attempt to achieve balance. For a start, experienced negotiators and scholars will find little in it that is unconventional, despite the hype. The main strength of the book is the author's idiosyncratic way of ordering and discussing evergreen themes. To anyone who has studied and practised serious negotiation, the elements of the four quadrant model (Aren't there always four quadrants?) and the twelve strategies will be valuable even though they are conventional apart from the astute strategy "Use Their Standards".

Confidence is fine but there seems to be a lot of implicit and explicit boasting by the author. `"Blah blah blah" said [insert John or Jane Doe], one of my former students and now the President of [insert `Goldman Sachs' etc.].' That is, if you are smart (rich?) enough to take his program and use the Diamond method you are, or will become, a high-flier. The formula becomes tedious.

The last paragraph of chapter 6 (Emotion) makes me wonder about the accuracy of some anecdotes given to the author: `"Her mother and the nurses looked at me like I was some sort of magician," Craig said. "Where did you learn that?" they asked. I'm happy to say he referred them to this book.' Pardon? Craig learned to negotiate from the book in which he is quoted as saying he learned from it?
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I studied negotiation with Prof. Diamond as a student at Penn Law. His class is legendary, both at the Law School and Wharton, and it's nearly impossible to get into, at least at the Law School. I got into the class as a 3L, and I was amazed by how well these techniques work. Prof. Diamond encourages his students to use the techniques to go out and haggle with their credit card companies, cell phone carriers, cable companies, and landlords in hopes of getting more from them. By the end of the semester, I most assuredly had gotten more. In fact, when I later called Comcast Cable to try to extend the free six months of HBO and Shotime I'd received while in Prof. Diamond's class, the customer service representative said, "Ok, I'll give you another six months free, but this is the last promotion you're getting. I'm looking at your account, and you have more free promotions than most Comcast employees." (As it turns out, that was not the last freebie Comcast would give me.)

But as time wore on and law school receded into the rearview mirror, I stopped practicing Prof. Diamond's techniques as I had when I took his class. Gradually, my skills faded, although I still brushed them off every now and again when the situation clearly called for them. But I'd stopped contacting my cable company and other service providers to get free goodies, and I slowly forgot just how applicable Prof. Diamond's methods are to nearly every interaction. In short, I started getting less. And then "Getting More" came out.

I realized about a dozen pages into the book that by failing to practice these tools, I was indeed getting less. This book really could not have arrived at a better time for me.
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Format: Hardcover
I'll start by saying there is a fair amount good information in this book and I would recommend reading it. Just be prepared to sift through a lot of filler to pick out the things of value. Mr. Diamond pretty regularly delivers a "look how great I am" feel that gets in the way of effectively delivering his message. He uses several examples that are questionable at best and for that reason should have been left out. I do have one fundamental disagreement with Mr. Diamond. He stresses putting yourself in other people's shoes. In the role playing scenarios he describes that can often be helpful just to better prepare you but in an active negotiation it's a sure fire way to make you look like an ass. That's because when you put yourself in someone else's shoes you start to make assumptions about that person. ASSumptions are a quick way to lose credibility and kill a deal. Stick to his method of asking the right questions to get the actual facts and you won't have to put yourself in their shoes because they'll spell it out for you. Also, please don't take his advice on negotiating with every person you see. Leave those poor retail sales people alone. They already put up with enough garbage and don't need you walking into their place of business to practice your newly discovered negotiating techniques on them. Just because you can get a discount doesn't mean you should. If you negotiate with everyone you meet you probably won't be well liked either. Overall, this book delivers a lot of good information and most people will take enough away from it to justify the purchase and time spent reading it. Just don't use it as your only source on negotiation. The rating of the book seems to be inflated because Mr. Diamond appears to have many enthusiastic former students eager to praise him.
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