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A Game of Thrones: The Story Continues Books 1-5: The bestselling epic fantasy masterpiece that inspired the award-winning HBO TV series GAME OF THRONES (A Song of Ice and Fire) by [George R.R. Martin]

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A Game of Thrones: The Story Continues Books 1-5: The bestselling epic fantasy masterpiece that inspired the award-winning HBO TV series GAME OF THRONES (A Song of Ice and Fire) Kindle Edition

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for George R. R. Martin and A Song of Ice and Fire
 
“One of the best series in the history of fantasy.”Los Angeles Times
 
“Long live George Martin . . . a literary dervish, enthralled by complicated characters and vivid language, and bursting with the wild vision of the very best tale tellers.”—The New York Times
 
“The only fantasy series I’d put on a level with J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings . . . It’s a fantasy series for hip, smart people, even those who don’t read fantasy.”Chicago Tribune
 
“Martin amply fulfills the first volume’s promise and continues what seems destined to be one of the best fantasy series ever written.”The Denver Post, on A Clash of Kings
 
“Martin has produced—is producing, since the series isn’t over—the great fantasy epic of our era. It’s an epic for a more profane, more jaded, more ambivalent age than the one Tolkien lived in.”—Lev Grossman, Time
 
“Addictive . . . George R. R. Martin has created the unlikely genre of the realpolitik fantasy novel.”Rolling Stone, on A Feast for Crows
 
“Epic fantasy as it should be written: passionate, compelling, convincingly detailed and thoroughly imagined.”The Washington Post, on A Dance with Dragons
 
“I always expect the best from George R. R. Martin, and he always delivers.”—Robert Jordan --This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

PROLOGUE [to A GAME OF THRONES]
 
“We should start back,” Gared urged as the woods began to grow dark around them.
 
“The wildlings are dead.”
 
“Do the dead frighten you?” Ser Waymar Royce asked with just the hint of a smile.
 
Gared did not rise to the bait. He was an old man, past fifty, and he had seen the lordlings come and go. “Dead is dead,” he said. “We have no business with the dead.”
 
“Are they dead?” Royce asked softly. “What proof have we?”
 
“Will saw them,” Gared said. “If he says they are dead, that’s proof enough for me.”
 
Will had known they would drag him into the quarrel sooner or later. He wished it had been later rather than sooner. “My mother told me that dead men sing no songs,” he put in.
 
“My wet nurse said the same thing, Will,” Royce replied. “Never believe anything you hear at a woman’s tit. There are things to be learned even from the dead.” His voice echoed, too loud in the twilit forest.
 
“We have a long ride before us,” Gared pointed out. “Eight days, maybe nine. And night is falling.”
 
Ser Waymar Royce glanced at the sky with disinterest. “It does that every day about this time. Are you unmanned by the dark, Gared?”
 
“Will could see the tightness around Gared’s mouth, the barely suppressed anger in his eyes under the thick black hood of his cloak. Gared had spent forty years in the Night’s Watch, man and boy, and he was not accustomed to being made light of. Yet it was more than that. Under the wounded pride, Will could sense something else in the older man. You could taste it; a nervous tension that came perilous close to fear.
 
Will shared his unease. He had been four years on the Wall. The first time he had been sent beyond, all the old stories had come rushing back, and his bowels had turned to water. He had laughed about it afterward. He was a veteran of a hundred rangings by now, and the endless dark wilderness that the southron called the haunted forest had no more terrors for him.
 
Until tonight. Something was different tonight. There was an edge to this darkness that made his hackles rise. Nine days they had been riding, north and northwest and then north again, farther and farther from the Wall, hard on the track of a band of Wildling raiders. Each day had been worse than the day that had come before it. Today was the worst of all. A cold wind was blowing out of the north, and it made the trees rustle like living things. All day, Will had felt as though something were watching him, something cold and implacable that loved him not. Gared had felt it too. Will wanted nothing so much as to ride hellbent for the safety of the Wall, but that was not a feeling to share with your commander.
 
Especially not a commander like this one.
 
Ser Waymar Royce was the youngest son of an ancient house with too many heirs. He was a handsome youth of eighteen, grey-eyed and graceful and slender as a knife. Mounted on his huge black destrier, the knight towered above Will and Gared on their smaller garrons. He wore black leather boots, black woolen pants, black moleskin gloves, and a fine supple coat of gleaming black ringmail over layers of black wool and boiled leather. Ser Waymar had been a Sworn Brother of the Night’s Watch for less than half a year, but no one could say he had not prepared for his vocation. At least insofar as his wardrobe was concerned.
 
His cloak was his crowning glory; sable, thick and black and soft as sin. “Bet he killed them all himself, he did,” Gared told the barracks over wine, “twisted their little heads off, our mighty warrior.” They had all shared the laugh.
 
It is hard to take orders from a man you laughed at in your cups, Will reflected as he sat shivering atop his garron. Gared must have felt the same.
 
“Mormont said as we should track them, and we did,” Gared said. “They’re dead. They shan’t trouble us no more. There’s hard riding before us. I don’t like this weather. If it snows, we could be a fortnight getting back, and snow’s the best we can hope for. Ever seen an ice storm, my lord?”
 
The lordling seemed not to hear him. He studied the deepening twilight in that half-bored, half-distracted way he had. Will had ridden with the knight long enough to understand that it was best not to interrupt him when he looked like that. “Tell me again what you saw, Will. All the details. Leave nothing out.”
 
Will had been a hunter before he joined the Night’s Watch. Well, a poacher in truth. Mallister freeriders had caught him red-handed in the Mallisters’ own woods, skinning one of the Mallisters’ own bucks, and it had been a choice of putting on the black or losing a hand. No one could move through the woods as silent as Will, and it had not taken the black brothers long to discover his talent.
 
“The camp is two miles farther on, over that ridge, hard beside a stream,” Will said. “I got close as I dared. There’s eight of them, men and women both. No children I could see. They put up a lean-to against the rock. The snow’s pretty well covered it now, but I could still make it out. No fire burning, but the firepit was still plain as day. No one moving. I watched a long time. No living man ever lay so still.”
 
“Did you see any blood?”
 
“Well, no,” Will admitted.
 
“Did you see any weapons?”
 
“Some swords, a few bows. One man had an axe. Heavy-looking, double-bladed, a cruel piece of iron. It was on the ground beside him, right by his hand.”
 
“Did you make note of the position of the bodies?”
 
Will shrugged. “A couple are sitting up against the rock. Most of them on the ground. Fallen, like.”
 
“Or sleeping,” Royce suggested.”
 
“Fallen,” Will insisted. “There’s one woman up an ironwood, half-hid in the branches. A far-eyes.” He smiled thinly. “I took care she never saw me. When I got closer, I saw that she wasn’t moving neither.” Despite himself, he shivered.
 
“You have a chill?” Royce asked.
 
“Some,” Will muttered. “The wind, m’lord.”
 
The young knight turned back to his grizzled man-at-arms. Frost-fallen leaves whispered past them, and Royce’s destrier moved restlessly. “What do you think might have killed these men, Gared?” Ser Waymar asked casually. He adjusted the drape of his long sable cloak.
 
“It was the cold,” Gared said with iron certainty. “I saw men freeze last winter, and the one before, when I was half a boy. Everyone talks about snows forty foot deep, and how the ice wind comes howling out of the north, but the real enemy is the cold. It steals up on you quieter than Will, and at first you shiver and your teeth chatter and you stamp your feet and dream of mulled wine and nice hot fires. It burns, it does. Nothing burns like the cold. But only for a while. Then it gets inside you and starts to fill you up, and after a while you don’t have the strength to fight it. It’s easier just to sit down or go to sleep. They say you don’t feel any pain toward the end. First you go weak and drowsy, and everything starts to fade, and then it’s like sinking into a sea of warm milk. Peaceful, like.”
 
“Such eloquence, Gared,” Ser Waymar observed. “I never suspected you had it in you.”
 
“I’ve had the cold in me too, lordling.” Gared pulled back his hood, giving Ser Waymar a good long look at the stumps where his ears had been. “Two ears, three toes, and the little finger off my left hand. I got off light. We found my brother frozen at his watch, with a smile on his face.”
 
Ser Waymar shrugged. “You ought dress more warmly, Gared.”
 
Gared glared at the lordling, the scars around his ear holes flushed red with anger where Maester Aemon had cut the ears away. “We’ll see how warm you can dress when the winter comes.” He pulled up his hood and hunched over his garron, silent and sullen.
 
“If Gared said it was the cold …” Will began.
 
“Have you drawn any watches this past week, Will?”
 
“Yes, m’lord.” There never was a week when he did not draw a dozen bloody watches. What was the man driving at?
 
“And how did you find the Wall?”
 
“Weeping,” Will said, frowning. He saw it clear enough, now that the lordling had pointed it out. “They couldn’t have froze. Not if the Wall was weeping. It wasn’t cold enough.”
 
Royce nodded. “Bright lad. We’ve had a few light frosts this past week, and a quick flurry of snow now and then, but surely no cold fierce enough to kill eight grown men. Men clad in fur and leather, let me remind you, with shelter near at hand, and the means of making fire.” The knight’s smile was cocksure. “Will, lead us there. I would see these dead men for myself.”
 
And then there was nothing to be done for it. The order had been given, and honor bound them to obey.
 
Will went in front, his shaggy little garron picking the way carefully through the undergrowth. A light snow had fallen the night before, and there were stones and roots and hidden sinks lying just under its crust, waiting for the careless and the unwary. Ser Waymar Royce came next, his great black destrier snorting impatiently. The warhorse was the wrong mount for ranging, but try and tell that to the lordling. Gared brought up the rear. The old man-at-arms muttered to himself as he rode.
  --This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.

Product details

  • Publication Date : March 15, 2012
  • File Size : 18316 KB
  • Word Wise : Enabled
  • Print Length : 4659 pages
  • Publisher : HarperVoyager (March 15, 2012)
  • ASIN : B007B5EDEG
  • Language: : English
  • Text-to-Speech : Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting : Enabled
  • X-Ray : Enabled
  • Lending : Not Enabled
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.7 out of 5 stars 20,615 ratings

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4.7 out of 5 stars
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