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Gathering Storm: America's Militia Threat Paperback – April 3, 1997

3.0 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In October 1994, six months before the bombing of an Oklahoma City federal office building killed 169 people, lawyer Morris Dees wrote to Attorney General Janet Reno, alerting her to the danger posed by right-wing militia groups, whose ranks were swelling with fanatical racists, neo-Nazis and other extremists. Dees had been monitoring violence-prone organizations for 14 years as investigator and chief trial counsel for the Klanwatch Project of the Southern Poverty Law Center based in Alabama. Written with reporter James Corcoran (whose Bitter Harvest tracked white supremacist meddling in the early 1980s farm crisis), this chilling expose gets deep inside the paranoid mentality of antigovernment hate groups, documenting the growing links among paramilitary units, white supremacists and neo-Nazis who preach armed confrontation. Dees traces Oklahoma bombing suspect Timothy McVeigh's ties to the militia and super-patriot underground, and he delineates striking parallels between the actual bombing and the fictional bombing done by McVeigh's hero in neo-Nazi William Pierce's 1978 novel, The Turner Diaries.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Every few years, Dees sums up the doings of white supremacists whom his Southern Poverty Law Center monitors and sometimes sues for civil rights infringements. This summation mainly concerns publicity-soaked cases like Ruby Ridge, Waco, and Oklahoma City. Dees also wades through the beliefs of several militantly lunatic groups, such as the Zionist Occupied Government (ZOG) signifies the federal government or that the underground book The Turner Diaries re-creates their ideal future--an America purged pure after a racial civil war. Very extreme, but some people, like the accused perpetrator of the Oklahoma City bombing, read and believe. Coinciding with the anniversary of that heinous act, Dees' review can, where interest warrants, supplement recent publications, like A Force upon the Plains by Kenneth Stern , a more fact-dense investigation of superpatriotism. Gilbert Taylor --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; 1st HarperPerennial Ed edition (April 3, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060927895
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060927899
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,111,915 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book is about America's other war on terror written by one of America's foremost experts on this subject civil rights attorney Morris Dees. In the past 13 and a half years the USA has been in a state of non stop war in Iraq and Afghanistan and other locals from the Philippines, the horn of Africa and Columbia prosecuting our war on terror. But I hope the American authorities have not forgotten about our home grown Tim McVeigh type terrorists who perpetrated the 'bubba job,' to quote one high ranking FBI official that was the Oklahoma city bombing. We need to stay vigilant not just against Al Qaeda and even domestic born Al Qaeda sympathizers but also keep a look out for those in the far right wing hate groups who would do harm to other Americans right here at home. Those in our own back yards. I hope our domestic counter terror apparatus namely the FBI and Dept. of homeland security are keeping tabs on these groups and that our elected representatives are keeping well resourced the FBI etc, to prevent any future Oklahoma city bombings.
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Format: Paperback
This is one of the best books I've read about the militia movement. It's extremely well documented and so neatly detailed it can be overwhelming. I was personally appalled by learning about the degree of paranoia displayed by most so-called "patriots" believing seriously deranged and illogical conspiracy theories. The part of the book that interested me most was the one where Dees details the connections between the militia movement and white supremacism and anti-Semitism. Same old hate in a new dress.
I would also like to point out that I found most of the reviews in this section to be extremely biased, paranoid and absolutely demeaning. Most of the previous reviews are nothing but rants attacking the person of Morris Dees. I wanted to balance those subjective views by pointing out that Mr. Dees is the person responsible for putting the KKK out of business by legal means, a hero of Human Rights. It's no surprise that most pro-militia readers automatically dislike Dees. As I said before, same old hate in a new dress.
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Format: Paperback
I revisited this book after noting Dees' Southern Poverty Law Center's continuing miserably low rating with charity watchdog The American Institute of Philanthropy. Fifteen years ago, Dees promised to stop fundarising at $55 million, only to raise that to $100 million two years later. Now he has $120 million and spends $6 million per year on fundraising and only half that much on helping victims of civil rights violations. I can't find a single figure, let alone a detailed financial report, on the SPLC web site. But he did build himself a massive stainless steel office building in Montgomery.
Race-baiting and scare-mongering pays very well, at least for Moe.
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Format: Hardcover
The groups the author writes about are not militias, and by his own admission during a television interview, they don't even call themselves militias. He totally ignores the true militia movement, which detests hate groups and has nothing to do with them, and misapplies the term "militia" to such detestable groups as a way, apparently, to try to discredit critics of the extensive usurpation of undelegated powers by the government and the massive violations of civil rights by officials. The author once won a lawsuit against a KKK group, and has since made a living trying to magnify the threat from hate groups, most of which are insignificant, as a way to get support from contributors. The greatest threat from racists is from those who have infiltrated the government at all levels, and which the militia movement has been instrumental in exposing, such as the annual "Good 'Ol Boys Roundup", an orgy of racism and sexism that is attended by law enforcement and judicial personnel , federal, state, and local
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By time4trbl on December 19, 2014
Format: Paperback
Great book.
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Format: Paperback
Dees has a desire to emasculate those who have reacted to what they see as unfair. We have a very sad state of affairs where people lose what they have and no one fights for their rights and assists them to keep what they have.
Can Dees look at those with a sincere need to recoup losses and regain a sense of dignity? As we lose more individually owned farms and ranches to the big corporate comglomerate who buys at a discount from themselves, further dissenfranchising the farmer, what do we do. If you want to understand the struggle of those in rural America read Harvest of Rage.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I rated this book as high as possible because it a well-done book,and very interesting and educating issue for the people interested in this theme
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Format: Paperback
Dees, in his tabloid-style account of the militia movement, omits facts, and connects militias to racist groups, a gross and innacurate generalization if ever there was one. Horribly biased throughout, this irresponsible book gets even worse in its last chapter, in which Dees rationalizes limiting the liberties of good, honest Americans for the security of paranoid winged monkeys of the New World Order such as himself.
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