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Get Up With It Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered

4.5 out of 5 stars 51 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered, August 1, 2000
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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

2CD Digitally Remastered Reissue of this Classic 1974 album with John McLaughlin & Herbie Hancock

Amazon.com

Issued just before Miles Davis entered the dark years of his retirement in 1975, Get Up with It includes tracks recorded between 1970 and 1975, and offers a roster of stars from throughout that period: Herbie Hancock, Keith Jarrett, John McLaughlin, Dave Liebman, Steve Grossman, Sonny Fortune, Pete Cosey, Billy Cobham, and Al Foster. Though something of a mixed bag, the disc does contain two of Davis's most important compositions. "He Loved Him Madly," dedicated to Duke Ellington, is a slow, almost novelistically developed meditation on Ellington's life and work, more than 30 minutes of music. "Rated X" is a buzzing, rattling essay on studio minimalism, and one that prophetically links world music and hip-hop, even before there was a name for such repetitive, incremental musics. Among the other tracks here, "Calypso Frelimo" offers some splendid Davis trumpet, a corrective for those who thought he had lost it by that time. Now digitally remastered, with a brighter sound, Get Up with It seems something of a summing up of Davis's great electrical period of 1970-1975. But it also hints at things to come when he made his comeback in the 1980s. --John F. Szwed
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
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30
32:13
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14:51
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5:53
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6:51
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Disc 2
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32:05
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3
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (August 1, 2000)
  • Rmst ed. edition
  • Original Release Date: August 1, 2000
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Columbia / Legacy
  • Run Time: 124 minutes
  • ASIN: B00004VWA5
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #15,183 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Sean M. Kelly on September 23, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Few lps offer the complete feeling of doom and overt fear as Miles' "Get Up With It" does. It'e easy to see why now- Duke Ellington's death; Miles' escallating drug abuse; his hip left him in constant pain; loss of then lady friend Betty Mabry to Jimi Hendrix, of all people; failed record sales...all these factors and more contributed to Miles' very very dark demeanor during the mid 70's, and his music wreaks of his pain.
The very dark, sad, minimalist "He Loved Him Madly" showcases Miles' deep pain in terms of Ellington's death. At points, the music sounds like it is going to stop, but Miles, mainly on the keyboards (an increasingly common Miles trait in this period), keeps this melancholic gem going to its completion- arguably one of the most touching tracks in the Miles Canon.
The bizarre "Rated X" is among one of Miles' most out there efforts, combining what we now call hip hop, with funk, and Stockhausen. The mix makes for an almost danceable, completely eerie, experience.
The danceable (for part of the track, anyhow) "Calypso Frelimo" is an upbeat affair despite its being played in minor keys. Miles' showcases his still intact trumpet playing chops- his notes biting, scathing, and drenched with wah wah. The deep african percussion by Mtume, funky bass playing by the underrated Mike Henderson, and the rock solid drumming by Al Foster keep this gem going through more minimalist and quiet middle passages, then back to its climatic finish.
And so it goes. Mere words can not do this, or any Miles lp, justice. The music needs to speak for itself, and this lp speaks to all the senses we have and probably beyond them. This lp is not easy listening, to be sure, but well worth the effort. the rewards are one thousand fold.
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Format: Audio CD
Without a doubt, one of the greatest albums of them all, a double set only comparable to the likes of the Stooges' "Funhouse" in its darkness, intensity and raw, funky sexuality. Now for starters let's get something straight: I loathe "fusion", and to even CONSIDER putting Miles' music of the '70s in that category - a genre filled with lilly-livered chumps like Return To Forever and the Yellow Jackets - is a great disservice to Miles and his music. From 1969 to '75, Mr. Davis pioneered and created his own unique sounds, a mixture of hard funk, psychedelic rock, avant-garde electronics and free jazz, that has never been equalled in regards to its sonics or its "vibe". There is NOTHING that can touch the raised-middle-finger jab in the guts felt when one puts on discs like "Dark Magus", "Live Evil", "Agharta", "Big Fun" or "On The Corner". The feelings of utter loathing and despair, the overwhelming EMOTION of these discs can be too much, yet nothing can prepare you for 1974's "Get Up With It", a disc of such wildness and total lack of any commercial forethought (and thank the heavens for that) that it was granted pretty much instant deletion upon release and has mainly only been available from Japan for the last 25 years. Start with the cover: a big, slightly unflattering, grainy photo of The Man. It's the sight of a man against the world, battling for his own identity. Hit the first track, "He Loved Him Madly" (a tribute to Duke Ellington), a 32-minute ambient piece only broken up occasionally by Peter Cosey's mumbling guitar lines. It's one of the saddest damn songs you'll ever hear, and you can bet yer booty that if it was made by a bunch of white guys in Berlin ca.Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
After buying this album and "On the Corner" on a whim, I was instantly impressed by how both of these albums (particularly "Get Up With It") defy categorization. This is not jazz, it's not funk, it's not rock, it's not soul, it's not ambient: it just is, and IS wonderful at that. This two-disc set features two showcase tracks: "He Loved Him Madly" and "Calypso Frelimo." Though I think "Calypso Frelimo" is the better track (featuring some wild, wah-wah filtered trumpet playing by Miles), "He Loved Him Madly" is eerie, moody, lovely. This track, and the fugue-like "Rated X," are thirty years ahead of their time -- the warped pop of Radiohead, the Chemical Brothers and Aphex Twin are unmistakably informed by these atmospheric and rhythmic sounds (whether they know it or not). Recorded between 1970 and 1974--when rock, soul and funk were easily outdistancing jazz in both popularity and artistic influence--Davis responded by creating something wholly new and other. "Get Up With It" (and especially "On the Corner") apparently remain touchy albums for die-hard Davis fans who prefer his earlier, legendary recordings ("Birth of the Cool," "Miles Ahead," "Kind of Blue," etc.). Lester Bangs notes as far back as 1980 that the daring music on these two albums by Miles "got kudos from jazz critics who never listened to them again and were rejected by fans." It's been twenty two years since Bangs wrote that, and we should now be ready to absorb what seemed alien in 1974.
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Format: Audio CD
In 1974, Duke Ellington died. Miles Davis, as far removed as jazz can get from the swing of Ellington, went into the studio (a place he'd largely avoided recently) to record a tribute to the musician he loved. That track ("He Loved Him Madly") and a session a few months later augmented by some studio leftovers from the previous four years became what would be the last studio recording Miles would release before his retirement-- the double album "Get Up With It".

The material from the two 1974 sessions is for me the highlight of the album. Miles' working band featured no less than three guitarists (the underheralded genius Pete Cosey, Reggie Lucas, and Domique Gaumont), reedman Sonny Fortune, and longtime rhythm section Michael Henderson (electric bass), Al Foster (drums) and Mtume (percussion). For "He Loved Him Madly", Miles used Dave Liebman, who had recently departed from the band, in place of Fortune. That tune, an extended work, is among the most dense and difficult material Miles has recorded. It is, not coincidentally among the most rewarding as well. Davis sits at the organ for the majority of the piece, whih opens in a funereal mood, with Davis droning at the keys, the guitars gently churning a fractured pattern and a dirge-like snare pattern. After a rather noticable edit around eleven minutes in, Liebman begins soloing, a delicate, gentle performance (on alto flute) where he takes time to develop the piece. The rhythm section is nothing short of astounding, with Foster and Mtume gently prodding while Henderson is nothing short of jawdropping. This is followed by a brief guitar solo and then an extended solo by Miles where he really pours his soul into his horn and is among the best performances by him on record.
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