Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Getting Started with D3 1st Edition

3.0 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1449328795
ISBN-10: 1449328792
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$13.00 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$15.95 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
38 New from $9.36 26 Used from $7.41
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Excel2016ForDummiesVideo
Excel 2016 For Dummies Video Training
Discover what Excel can do for you with self-paced video lessons from For Dummies. Learn more.
$15.95 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Getting Started with D3
  • +
  • Interactive Data Visualization for the Web
  • +
  • Data Visualization with D3.js Cookbook
Total price: $92.33
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Book Description

Creating Data-Driven Documents

About the Author

Mike Dewar is a data-scientist at Bitly, a New York tech company that makes long URLs shorter. He has a PhD in modelling dynamic systems from data from the University of Sheffield in the UK, and has worked as a Machine Learning post-doc in The University of Edinburgh and Columbia University. He has been drawing graphs regularly since he was in High School, and is starting to get the hang of it.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 70 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (July 13, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1449328792
  • ISBN-13: 978-1449328795
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #933,436 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Way overpriced for the content. This book feels more like a teaser. Where's the beef?! The author does not give any insight into several D3 graphs such as Chord Graphs. To the author: Keep working please.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Fair intro to d3, except it's a short 50 pages long and covers most material already available online through all of Mike Bostock's examples and tutorials on the d3 website. To be fair, I'd pay 4x this for a 2 hour session of someone teaching d3 in person, but I really don't think this is enough content to justify a book at $20.

I have to say I was pretty disappointed upon receiving this, expecting a higher bar from O'Reilly.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The book hardly touches the features of d3 and doesn't discuss the library in any detail. It is a good starting point for someone interested in taking a first look at d3, but ends abruptly, leaving you nowhere. You would still be confused if you read the whole book and went back to the d3 documentation.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was a bit surprised when I got this book as it was barely larger than O'reilly pocket references. I was hoping for something closer to their book "Visualizing Data" which was fantastic for it's time, but utilizes a Java-based language that doesn't work well on the web, whereas D3 is javascript-based, and works fantastic on the web. The book goes to recommend Visualizing Data and learning JavaScript, but in doing that, the same material in this book can be found in free tutorials all over the web. Hopefully they have a much larger 2nd edition planned. But what really got me was the amount of errors in the code in a book this small. Doesn't anyone proofread anymore?
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
D3, javascript, and dataviz is so far outside my day-to-day programming experience that I had no way of figuring out how to get from the examples on d3js.org to some form of Hello World locally.

This book got me passed that initial hurdle.

By the end of the book, having typed all the examples 'by hand' so to speak, and trying to force my brain to internalize the basic mechanics of the thing, I think I've understood the basic idea of the enter() selection, and feel like I can probably figure out update() and exit() on my own, suggesting that the author accomplished what he set out to do. I believe I've now "gotten started" enough that I can for the most part ask the right questions somewhere when I do get stuck.

One thing that I, as a complete and utter novice, would have loved some extra hand-holding on, is how to determine axes and ranges and widths and domains. This can sort of be extrapolated from the examples, but a clear intro to these things would be a great help.

Another area that I wish the book had touched upon (preferably with a code example) is creating realtime visualizations. Without some idea of what goes into creating a realtime visualization it's incredibly difficult to figure out which search terms to use in order to stumble across useful information (it turns out node.js and socket.io are a good starting point, in case you were wondering).

The code examples use real-world (as opposed to contrived) data, which is a huge plus.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
For the past several weeks, I've been working with some visualization libraries in JavaScript. There are a number of different options available, from using the bitmap graphics in the HTML 5 canvas, to writing vector graphics with SVG output.

One of the more popular libraries at the moment is D3, which provides a flexible framework for visualizing large datasets in SVG. While the examples and API documentation available on the D3 website are helpful, I have also found Mike Dewar's book, "Getting Started with D3" to be a helpful resource.

Dewar uses a publicly available resource, the New York Metropolitan Transit Authority Data Set, to demonstrate how the library can be used to present data in a number of ways. The book covers all the basics with D3, from the selection model, to interactive graphs, and specialized layouts, such as force-directed graphs. While it covers some of these concepts, it never goes into great detail about anything in particular. While this is a "getting started" book, it's very much an introductory title.

Still, this is a relatively short book. It's a good introduction to D3, but leaves a great deal about the library to be explored. In chapter 3, the author notes that the standard D3 visualizations are rendered in SVG, which limits the usage to modern browsers. While it is noted that Internet Explorer 9 (March 2011) provides SVG support, the book fails to explain exactly what that means today. As I've mentioned before, IE 8 is the most recent version of Internet Explorer that can run on Windows XP, which still has a sizeable market share.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is of no value. The books is very short, contains only the most simple and basic plots (all of which are ugly and terrible visualizations), and is easily found for free online. Not really even usable as a reference guide. I am extremely disappointed because I can see how powerful D3 can be when used right. This is not the book to learn how to use it. Strongly recommend that you look elsewhere.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Getting Started with D3
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Getting Started with D3

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: web programming