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Getz Au Go Go Live

4.5 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Live, October 25, 1990
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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Audio CD. 1964 live performance in New York at the Cafe Au Go Go by the New Stan Getz Quartet featuring vocals by Astrud Gilberto. Musicians Stan Getz, Gary Burton, Gene Cherico and Joe Hunt.

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The sultry, cool vocals of Astrud Gilberto steal the show of this live 1964 set, recorded in Greenwich Village's Cafe Au Go Go. Backed by Gary Burton on the vibes, Gene Cherico on bass, and skinsman Joe Hunt, Getz and crew saunter through "Summertime," "The Singing Song," and "6-Nix-Pix-Flix" (the latter two penned by the then-21-year-old Burton). Of course, nothing comes close to the magic of Gilberto and her breathtaking contributions on "Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars," "It Might as Well Be Spring," and "The Telephone Song." Compared to some of his more adventurous early-'60s recordings (Focus, Mickey One), Getz Au Go-Go--the saxophonist's last bossa nova disc--is an oasis of comforting cool-jazz sounds. --James Hendrickson

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Corcovado (Quiet Nights Of Quiet Stars)
  2. It Might Be As Well Spring
  3. Eu E Voce
  4. Summertime
  5. Only Trust Your Heart
  6. The Singing Song
  7. The Telephone Song
  8. One Note Samba
  9. Here's That Rainy Day
  10. 6-Nix-Pix-Flix


Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 25, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Live
  • Label: Polygram Records
  • ASIN: B0000046TR
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #234,121 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Although Astrud Gilberto has drawn most of the attention given this album over the years, what makes it a classic is the interaction of the then young Gary Burton with Getz and bassist Gene Cherico. They do the best version EVER of "Here's that Rainey Day" and one of the best of "Summer Time." The bossa novas and Gilberto are charming and wonderful, but it is their lyric, swinging treatment of the standards that make this one of the best jazz albums of all time, perhaps to be ranked with Miles Davis' "Blue" and Bill Evans "Conversations with Myself."
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Format: Audio CD
A point I haven't seen mention online is that this is a studio recording with overdubbed applause. Producer Phil Schapp
explained this in a commentary published in 1989 in the Bossa Nova Years collection, below:
"I did not find much original tape for Getz Au Go Go, but I did unravel a mystery. Clearly something was up when Verve
decided to follow up the triumph of 'The Girl from Ipanema' with a second recording of Stan Getz and Astrud Gilberto.
Verve recorded her with Stan at the Cafe Au Go Go. They recorded her with Stan at the legendary Carnegie Hall Bossa
Nova Concert. *And* they recorded the two using the very same songs in the studio! The "post-production" decision
was to use the studio material with phony applause, claiming it came from the live Au Go Go date...NOT SO. This set all
but eliminates this gaffe.
Stan Getz appeareed with his new group at the Cafe Au Go Go in Greenwich Village during May 1964. The gig ran from
May1-31, 1964. The recording was done on May 22, '64 *not* June '64 which has long been listed. AStrud Gilberto
appeared with this unit for at least two weeks....On October 6, 1964--and perhaps on other dates as well--Astrud Gildberto
recorded with Stan Getz in the Studio, remaking the songs she had sung with Getz at the Au Go Go and would sing three
days later with Getz at Carnegie Hall. The studio material and the Carnegie Hall recording are what have survived"
--Phil Schaap, 'Technical and Discographical Comments,' published in booklet of complilation The Girl from Ipanema:
The Bossa Nova Years.
To further confuse the issue, elsewhere in the booklet of the same collection is this note about Getz Au Go Go:
"Live material recorded May 22, 1964 in New York.
Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
There is debate on line at to whether this album was recorded in a nightclub setting or in a studio. I can tell you this: I was there during the recording. It was at the Cafe Au Go Go on Bleecker Street. B U T, it was not at night. It was a simulated night scene. It was recorded in the afternoon. The recording stipulations were these: The first 200 people would be admitted; no drinks would be served, except for the pitchers of free Cokes and plastic glasses; no whistling after the songs because it played hob with the recording equipment, though applause was all right and whistling at the end. It was a fun session with everyone in good form. Getz and Astrud enjoyed a great rapport. On "It Might As Well Be Spring," there's a tenor riff which she is to repeat vocally. Three times she didn't come in right and they did a retake. On the fourth time, Getz forgot to come back in. He admitted it and everybody enjoyed a loose laugh. Young vibist Gary Burton was in fine form. Stan's father was there enjoying the session. Finally, I know they used this tape because at the end of the album I recognize my own inimitable whistle. Let the debate continue, but I tell you I was there and it was at the Cafe Au Go Go.
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Format: Audio CD
The real shame of this particular edition of the Getz quartet is that it was so underrecorded. A reviewer below blames Norv (sic) Granz, Verve's owner. Sorry, buddy, but Norman Granz hadn't owned Verve since 1961, so he never saw any of the profit from the Getz "bossa nova" albums -- can't blame him. True, Getz did eventually tire of the bossa hoopla -- but then again, so did Paul Desmond, who was one of it's biggest exponents. Just like everything else that becomes popular, consumerism kills it, then proceeds to beat it in the ground. At any rate, this is a quality band. Gary Burton on vibes gives the band a different texture, and Astrud's voice fits in perfectly with the cool (gasp!) sound of this group. This quartet was also documented on the "Nobody Else But Me" album and the "Getz/Gilberto #2" cd, recorded live at Carnegie Hall. Both are worth picking up. Incidentally, there is a rare lp on the CanAm label of a recording of this quartet in concert in Canada. If you're a completist, look for that, too.
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Format: Audio CD
This is a storied recording, reported to have been a studio album with audience sounds overdubbed...it doesn't sound that way,feels like a live recording. That being said, I don't care if it was taped in a phone booth, it's a great album. Getz sounds great and Gary Burton is on hand with his vibes and Astrud Gilberto is her mesmeric self. I love, "The Telephone Song" catchy and the band seems to be having fun and when Astrud laugh at the end it charms me so. I moved to New York in the late 60's and whenever I walked by The Cafe Au Go Go, I though of this album and it would start me humming "Summertime".
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