Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Ghost World: The Special Edition Hardcover – Deluxe Edition, September 10, 2008

4.6 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover, Deluxe Edition, September 10, 2008
$69.10 $41.34

click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Review

About the Author

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Fantagraphics; Special edition (September 10, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1560978902
  • ISBN-13: 978-1560978909
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 1.1 x 11.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,069,554 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
The Story
"Ghost World" was released way back in the 90's during the height of the cynical teen culture. They swear! They complain! They mope! Nobody in the world can possibly understand what they're going through! But, we do. If you read this book at the appropriate age, (I would say around 13-17.) then you were probably sucked right into their world.

They are truly philosophers of teenage angst. If you read it after your teenage/young adult years, you'll simply see them as whining kids. Which is fair, they are, but no book besides "The Catcher in the Rye" so perfectly captured teenage angst in its pure roots. Throw this book at a surly teen and they will treasure it forever, making them feel not so alone. Heavens, it might even make them laugh occasionally!

I grew up reading this book. When I first got it, I was a misfit in High School and could empathize with the loner outcast feel they sent off. When I grew a little older into my late teens, I understood how people grow up and grow apart, and had a falling out with my best friend that mirrored events in the book itself. Finally, I realized how there was more to life than simply sitting down and feeling sorry for yourself. Now, in my young adult stage, I can see the girls for what they are: A perfect time capsule of one point in every persons life. They aren't great thinkers except for what they are at that exact stage.

You may not truly appreciate the depths the book has unless you had read it while younger. But if you can remember teen years, then its worth it to pick up a copy.

The Book
This is a fantastic release. It has the original book with all the art work intact, along with original copies of the book from the Eightball magazine.
Read more ›
Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
In the Ghost World graphic novel, there is a sense of the masks that younger people try on, trying to pounce on others outside of their clique and keep close friends within their own small sphere as they move through life. Clowes repeatedly demonstrates how often choices are made just to entertain others by talking about it later on. You get a sense that the decisions people make are largely out of social stigmas, and he delineates so many of them that it appears entirely rational. He shows how many tensions there are in growing up, sure, but also within friendships (sexual and intellectual rivalries) and exposes the arbitrary nature of early relationships in a way that can often be surprisingly revelatory.

There an interesting theme of dodging the freaks that appear around them... until they end up on television at least. John Ellis' character seemed to hover around the issue of child molestation just to lightly suggest that Rebecca had experienced that in her past, as a contributing factor to her character.

I love that Enid was looking for one lame children's record the entire time as she tried on her various disguises over the years. It reminds you of the nostalgia that overwhelms you at around 18 where you realize how formative all of those interests proved to be.

The movie's decision to have an age-based romance between Enid and a record collector seemed shoehorned in, and the art class jokes take us away from the real point of the story in the graphic novel. Point being, if you have to choose one of them, get this.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
THIS BOOK IS GREAT! I constantly use it for references and why get the individual set of Ghost World and Ghost World script book. get this book and you'll also get some extra stuff. Sketches, unused art work, Alternative covers, The WHOLE ENCHILADA!
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
In Ghost World, Daniel Clowes doesn't romanticize the teenage experience or show teenage girls as sweet and idealistic. His portrayal is raw, cynical, and honest, often hitting the nail on the head.

Enid and Rebecca are best friends who constantly shout insults at each other, because that's how they communicate. I'm not used to seeing people talk this way in books, but I also know people who talk this way. It's not over-the-top or malicious...it's real.

The girls also don't know what they want in their future, especially Enid. She's graduated from high school and her father is pressing for college. She's not interested in college, but she doesn't want to disappoint her father, and she doesn't know what to do instead of school, either. She doesn't look for a job or try to figure out the next step in her life.

Enid and Rebecca are very cynical and caustic, but they live in a world where they can see no other way to act. Everyone around them is pretentious or clueless...or both. The stuff on television and in magazines strikes them as ridiculous. They can't stand the people around them. It's an excellent portrayal of alienation, especially teenage alienation. Even when Enid and Rebecca aren't being nice, they're still understandable. This graphic novel is very funny, but it's also very sad, and sometimes it's both at the same time. The saddest part is when Enid and Rebecca pull a prank on a man trying to meet a woman, but the girls, especially Enid, don't realize what they've done until it's too late.

Ghost World is very well known in the comics world, a sort of classic in the field. Others might be familiar with the critically acclaimed movie based on it and starring Thora Birch, Scarlett Johansson, and Steve Buscemi.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: graphic novels