Facebook Twitter Pinterest
& FREE Shipping—or get FREE Two-Day Shipping with Amazon Prime
Only 3 left in stock - order soon.
The Gilmore Girls Complet... has been added to your Cart

Ship to:
To see addresses, please
or
Please enter a valid US zip code.
or
FREE Shipping. Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Good readable copy. Worn edges and covers and may have small creases A Cut down the spine of case. Otherwise item is in good condition.
Trade in your item
Get up to a $44.43
Gift Card.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$149.39
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: Vulcandeals
Add to Cart
$161.72
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: sophies-movies
Add to Cart
$176.77
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: Amazon.com

The Gilmore Girls Complete Series (7 Seasons)

4.6 out of 5 stars 886 customer reviews

Additional DVD options Edition Discs
Price
New from Used from
DVD
(Nov 13, 2007)
"Please retry"
42
$149.39
$149.39 $54.99
DVD
"Please retry"
42
$71.21 $79.33

Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream thousands of movies & TV shows included with Prime. Start your free trial
$149.39 & FREE Shipping—or get FREE Two-Day Shipping with Amazon Prime Only 3 left in stock - order soon. Sold by discountedmediaoutlet and Fulfilled by Amazon.

Frequently bought together

  • The Gilmore Girls Complete Series (7 Seasons)
  • +
  • Talking as Fast as I Can: From Gilmore Girls to Gilmore Girls (and Everything in Between)
  • +
  • Eat Like a Gilmore: The Unofficial Cookbook for Fans of Gilmore Girls
Total price: $179.82
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Welcome to picture-perfect Stars Hollow, Connecticut. Population 9,973. And home of thirtysomething Lorelai and her teenage daughter Rory - the Gilmore Girls. Lauren Graham plays quick-witted Lorelai, mother of Rory (Alexis Bledel) and also her daughter's best friend, confidante and mentor determined to help her avoid the mistakes that sidetracked Lorelai when she was a teen. Hearts break and mend, careers end and begin, folks stumble and pick themselves up in a series that's "...blissfully brilliant" (Ken Parish Perkins, Fort Worth Star- Telegram). All the Love, All the Laughter, All the Witty Banter ? Here is one Complete Set: - 153 EPISODE ON 42 DISCS housed in an adorable retro-doll case and brimming with over 110 hours of Gilmore Girls memories. - HOURS OF BONUS FEATURES including Unaired Scenes, Behind-the-Scenes Cast/Creator Spotlights and Making-of Featurettes, Episode Commentaries, Interactive Stars Hollow Map and Lots More! - THE COMPLETE SERIES GUIDE TO GILMORE-ISMS: a Collectible book covering the pop-culture referneces from all seven seasons, never before available! - and an ALL-NEW EPISODE GUIDE packed with beautiful photos!

Note on Boxed Sets: During shipping, discs in boxed sets occasionally become dislodged without damage. Please examine and play these discs. If you are not completely satisfied, we'll refund or replace your purchase.

Review

Season 1-A very atypical mother-daughter relationship is at the center of Gilmore Girls, a comedy-drama that immediately set itself apart from the herd with smarter-than-smart dialogue and an endearing mix of whimsical comedy and family drama. Set in the Capra-esque burg of Stars Hollow, where everybody knows everyone and eccentrics abound, Gilmore Girls was less a mother-daughter show and more of a screwball buddy comedy in which the two buddies happened to be parent and child. Pregnant at 16, Lorelai (Lauren Graham) left her rich parents to bring up her daughter Rory (Alexis Bledel) on her own terms; when Rory herself turns 16, Lorelai wants to send her academically gifted daughter to the prestigious Chilton school. The catch is, Lorelai can't afford it on her own, and rather than let Rory go without, the elder Gilmore girl brokers an uneasy truce with her parents (Edward Herrmann and Kelly Bishop), who finally get a chance to bond with their granddaughter while financing her education.

It sounds like a premise potentially fraught with angst and trauma, but in reality Gilmore Girls was one of the freshest, airiest, most enjoyable shows to air on the perpetually melodramatic WB network, critically praised once viewers got hooked on its unique brand of humor. Rory's growing-up adventures, including her acclimation to snooty Chilton and romance with townie dreamboat Dean (Jared Padalecki), gave the show a teen-friendly feel, but Gilmore Girls was anchored in the adult by the luminous Graham, a brilliant comedic leading lady who could turn dramatic on a dime and never break stride. The show's hallmark was its rat-a-tat, whipsmart dialogue, delivered perfectly by Graham and Bledgel, as well as a host of wacky supporting characters who would go on to become invaluable cast members. The first season allowed the show--and its lead actresses--to bloom gracefully and establish a deep, humorous rapport that lent itself perfectly to weekly travails both comedic and dramatic. --Mark Englehart

Season 2-Love was in the air at the beginning of the second season of Gilmore Girls, as both Gilmores found themselves in the midst of perfect, giddy relationships--or so they thought. Lorelai (Lauren Graham) had accepted the proposal of English teacher Max (Scott Cohen) and was excitedly planning her first wedding; Rory (Alexis Bledel) was back on happy footing with townie hunk Dean (Jared Padalecki) after a dust-up near the end of season one that prompted a mini-break for the teen twosome. However, series creator Amy Sherman-Palladino had anything but smooth sailing on the horizon for her heroines, giving Lorelai a severe case of cold feet and Rory a major distraction in the form of Jess (Milo Ventimiglia), the bad boy newly arrived in town. Soon, Rory found herself extremely attracted to Jess, while Lorelai rekindled the flame of passion that once burned long ago with Rory's father, Christopher (David Sutcliffe), who made his way back into her life despite a girlfriend in the wings.

After the minor romantic speed bumps of the first season, the introduction of actual conflict into the second season of Gilmore Girls helped give the happy-goofy atmosphere of Stars Hollow a decided tension, as Rory tangled with her emotions over Jess and began the first tiny steps away from her good-girl persona. The episode "A-Tisket, A-Tasket," centered around the annual town auction of picnic baskets, was a wonderful portrait of Rory's conflicting adolescent feelings for both Dean and Jess. However, it was Lorelai's simmering chemistry with former flame Christopher, only hinted at in the first season, that gave the show its energy as well as its heartbreak, culminating in the stellar season finale "I Can't Get Started." But lest you think Gilmore Girls was centered only on romance, the second season also gave the expansive ensemble cast many hilarious moments, ranging from the hallway politics of Rory's private school to the town antics that shaped the Gilmores' daily lives. Through it all, the appealing Bledel and the radiant Graham exuded wit, charm, and a way with snappy patter not seen since the golden days of '30s screwball comedy. --Mark Englehart

Season 3-Senior year meant some surprising changes for the Gilmore girls, as both Lorelai (Lauren Graham) and Rory (Alexis Bledel) wrestled with their pasts in order to figure out what the heck they were going to do with their futures. In the wake of finding out that her relationship with Rory's dad was not to be rekindled, Lorelai endured a variety of suitors as she attempted to keep her life on an evil keel--not easy when her former flame's girlfriend was pregnant (and clueless), her former fiancé shows up unexpectedly, and her beloved inn suffers some unforeseen damage. If it was minor drama for Lorelai, it was full-fledged soap opera for Rory, who broke up with longtime boyfriend Dean (Jared Padalecki) in the wake of her attraction to the moody bad-boy Jess (Milo Ventimiglia), only to find her new relationship fraught with difficulties. Add to that the pressure of getting into college (Harvard or Yale?) and stressful senior class politics at the snooty Chilton private school, and it's a wonder she still had time to crack wise at breakneck speed with her mom and the rest of Stars Hollow.

The center of the third season of Gilmore Girls was the Rory-Dean-Jess triangle, which played out with surprising sensitivity and not a bit of sadness; it all came to a head in the episode "They Shoot Gilmores, Don't They?" in which Rory and Lorelai's quest to win a dance marathon ends in tears and break-ups. The year's teen drama did have a tendency to put the adults on the back burner, but the luminous Graham made the most of her character's dilemmas, whether gauging her growing attraction to diner owner Luke (Scott Patterson) or wrestling with her parents' continuous meddling. While it is hard to pinpoint a specific compelling story arc for this season, that doesn't mean it wasn't filled with the charm, smarts, and rapid-fire dialogue that made Gilmore Girls one of the brightest shows on television. Stellar supporting turns from Liza Weil as Paris, Rory's friend and nemesis by turns, and a pre-O.C. Adam Brody, as a band member who falls for Rory's best friend Lane (Keiko Agena), also punctuated the drama of the season with great comedy. --Mark Englehart

Season 4-The sum of its parts was definitely greater than the season whole as Gilmore Girls kicked off its fourth year by separating its high-powered mother-daughter duo. After years of toil at snooty private school Chilton, Rory (Alexis Bledel) was finally off to the greener pastures of college as she began her first year at Yale. The not-so-long distance put a crimp in her relationship with her mother, Lorelai (Lauren Graham), as the two were forced to continue their chatty conversations via phone--not exactly the same as trading barbs face-to-face. While Rory adjusted to college life with cranky roommate Paris (Liza Weil) in tow, Lorelai found herself without a daughter, but gained a boyfriend in the form of Jason "Digger" Stiles (Chris Eigeman), a childhood friend and now her father's business partner. But the lure of Stars Hollow, the Gilmores' cherished country town, would prove too hard to resist, as Lorelai finally made plans to open her own inn, and the two ladies found themselves attracted to town residents--for Lorelai, an intensifying of her friendship with diner owner Luke (Scott Patterson), and for Rory, a return to old boyfriend Dean (Jared Padalecki), which put a decided tension into a show that sorely needed it. Nevermind that both men were married to other women!

The first half of the fourth season definitely foundered, as the show's usually topnotch creative team struggled to find a way to keep the Gilmore chemistry afloat despite separating their main characters. There wasn't much drama to be found for Rory in starting college, and though it got off to a great start, Lorelai's relationship with Jason never fully gelled. However, once the show got its girls into the arms of their Stars Hollow men, it turned around almost immediately, surging towards a creative revival that put its ratings higher than they'd ever been before. Along the way to its surprising and complex season finale, there were great episodes to be had: "Girls in Bikinis, Boys Doin' the Twist," which found Rory and Paris on spring break; "The Reigning Lorelai," centering on an unexpected funeral; "The Festival of Living Art," which had Stars Hollow resident re-creating classic works; and "Luke Can See Her Face," which finally brought the Luke-Lorelai romance to the forefront. The season may have started out rough, but this fourth year ended with a bang, and the promise of more fireworks to come. --Mark Englehart

Season 5-Perennially one of the WB's highest-rated series, Gilmore Girls hit its creative high point to date with its stellar fifth season, which started out with young Rory (Alexis Bledel) feeling the fallout of doing something terribly non-Rory-like: sleeping with Dean (Jared Padalecki), her married ex-boyfriend. Rory's indulgence in adultery put, for the first time, a serious, sharp wedge in her relationship with her mother, Lorelai (Lauren Graham), who was both shocked by her daughter's behavior and worried Rory would repeat the mistakes Lorelai made at her age. But while Rory jetted off to Europe with her grandmother (Kelly Bishop) for the summer, Lorelai finally got her relationship with diner owner Luke (Scott Patterson) into a serious groove, starting with an official (and incredibly sweet) first date and others that involved, if you can believe it, a Swedish Pippi Longstocking movie. And as Lorelai navigated romantic terrain in Stars Hollow (terrain that of course did not run smooth), Rory found life more complex in her second year at Yale, as her relationship with Dean became increasingly strained. Not only that, she found her attention turned towards preppy Logan (Matt Czurchy), a spoiled rich kid who represented everything Rory couldn't stand--and was of course immediately attracted to. Little did Rory know that Logan's entrance into her life, and her interaction with his family, would be the catalyst for one of the most momentous decisions she would ever make.

With this season of Gilmore Girls, creative forces Amy Sherman-Palladino and Daniel Palladino finally found a way to make the Stars Hollow-Yale dichotomy work perfectly, as each location still stood alone but had decided repercussions on the other. Gone were freshman-year anxieties for Rory and in their place were more adult romantic concerns as well as a class consciousness that, for the first serious time, found Rory on the side of the haves and not the have-nots. While the Rory-Dean drama played itself out nicely and succinctly, it was the devilish Logan who lit a fire underneath this Gilmore girl; the episode "You Jump, I Jump, Jack" was a lovely twist on the '30s romantic comedies that found rich folk at play with words and deeds. Bledel started to fully blossom as Rory grew from ingénue to leading lady, and she was matched peerlessly by Graham, whose passion, anger, stubbornness, and ravishing beauty all came to a head in "Wedding Bell Blues," which featured her two greatest nemeses: her mother and Rory's dad, Christopher (David Sutcliffe). The show's trademark eccentricities were all in place--including a Pulp Fiction party and an elementary school production of Fiddler on the Roof, among other things--but it mined the best drama of its run with the season's last four episodes, which found Rory's confidence shaken to the core. To give any of the proceedings away would spoil the drama, but suffice it to say you will be glued to the TV for this season's final four hours; it's Gilmore Girls at its phenomenal best. --Mark Englehart

Season 6-The rapid-paced banter between the mother-daughter team of Lorelai (Lauren Graham) and Rory Gilmore (Alexis Bledel) is the calling card for Gilmore Girls. The show's sixth year--which aired during the 2005-2006 TV season--remains witty, charming, and touching. The previous season left Yale undergrad Rory in trouble with the law after a night of very un-Gilmore-like behavior with her rich, handsome boyfriend Logan (Matt Czuchry). This season opens with Rory potentially facing jail time, undecided about returning to college, and--most disturbingly of all--fighting with her mother. This isn't a fight over who gets to eat the last egg roll, but rather a battle of wills. It will take a few episodes before the two are talking to each other again and the viewer can breathe a sigh of relief that all is well in Stars Hollow. In the meantime, Rory moves into her busybody grandparents' pool house. One evening, they invite their minister over to dinner. His job? To encourage Rory to remain chaste. Not one to be told how to live her life, Rory is nonplussed. After telling him he's a little too late to offer that advice, she asks, "Have you seen The 40 Year Old Virgin"?

After many years of playing verbal footsy, Lorelai and Luke (Scott Patterson) finally get serious and engaged. But just when things are going smoothly, Luke learns of a daughter he never knew he had. The introduction of the little girl doesn't do much for the plot--other than to slow it down and cause more fights between Luke and Lorelai. When Luke warns Lorelai, "I don't like ultimatums," she snaps back, "I don't like Mondays, but unfortunately they come around eventually." This 5-disc 22-episode set includes an eclectic and impressive range of guest stars (Skid Row's Sebastian Bach, Paul Anka, Sonic Youth, and Madeline Albright, who appears in a dream sequence as Rory's mom). But it's cast regular Kelly Bishop as Lorelai's mother Emily who is one of the show's true gems. Prim, proper, and judgmental, she's also fiercely protective of her brood. When she learns that Logan's mother said unfavorable things about Rory, Emily confronts the woman and puts her in her place. Politely, of course. By the end of the season, one of the main characters will get married, another will have an affair, and a third will have a dalliance with an ex-boyfriend. But the relationship between Lorelai and Rory remains strong. And that's what keeps viewers watching. --Jae-Ha Kim

Season 7-All good things must end, but not all good things end well. Gilmore Girls is one of the most original and entertaining television programs ever to grace the CW. Lorelai and Rory Gilmore (Lauren Graham and Alexis Bledel) star as the quick-witted and heavily caffeinated mother-daughter duo at the heart of this quirky drama. Normally smarter than the average show, the seventh season represents a slump in an otherwise brilliant run. The seventh season is the first without series creator Amy Sherman-Palladino, and her absence is evident. Smart characters make dumb decisions and dumb characters spend too much time on screen. The normally fluid plot slumbers along as Rory's father Christopher returns as Lorelai's love interest, Rory gets even more serious with Logan, while Luke and Lorelai try to repair their damaged relationship. But it's not all bleak. Highpoints of the season include the birth of Lane's twins, plus the long-awaited cameo by Christiane Amanpour, which sends Rory into a tizzy: "I can't meet Christiane Amanpour in my pajamas!" The counterbalance of the quirky Stars Hollowians, which is half the fun of Gilmore Girls in previous seasons, is gone or, worse, awkwardly shoehorned in. Still, for fans of the series the final season is a must-own, if only to find out what happens to the characters they loved and laughed with for so many years. --Megan Chaffee



Special features

  • 153 episodes on 42 discs
  • Hours of bonus features
  • Episode guide with photos
  • All-new complete guide to Gilmore-isms
  • Custom doll-case packaging

Product details

  • Producers: Cavin Polone, Amy Sherman-Palladino, David S. Rosenthal
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 4.0), English (Dolby Digital 5.1), English (Stereo)
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 42
  • Rated:
    Unrated
    Not Rated
  • Studio: WB Television Network, The
  • DVD Release Date: November 13, 2007
  • Run Time: 44 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 886 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B000U0F7RG
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #55,957 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?
    If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

  • Learn more about "The Gilmore Girls Complete Series (7 Seasons)" on IMDb

Customer reviews

Top customer reviews

on April 28, 2017
Format: DVD|Verified Purchase
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on December 8, 2014
Format: DVD|Verified Purchase
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on January 14, 2015
Format: DVD|Verified Purchase
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on July 14, 2015
Format: DVD|Verified Purchase
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on October 31, 2016
Format: DVD|Verified Purchase
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on March 18, 2013
Format: DVD|Verified Purchase
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on December 25, 2013
Format: DVD|Verified Purchase
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on July 4, 2017
Format: DVD|Verified Purchase
review image
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Most recent customer reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Gilmore Girls Complete Series (7 Seasons)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Gilmore Girls Complete Series (7 Seasons)


What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?


Look for similar items by category

Pages with related products. See and discover other items: high power fuses, 2002 mercury sable oem replacement parts, automotive replacement fuses