Kindle Price: $9.99

Save $4.96 (33%)

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

A Girl's Guide to Modern European Philosophy by [Greig, Charlotte]
Kindle App Ad

A Girl's Guide to Modern European Philosophy Kindle Edition

3.5 out of 5 stars 28 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$9.99

Length: 287 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

click to open popover

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In her first novel, singer-songwriter and music journalist Greig examines the case of second-year philosophy student Susanna, who frequently wakes up, screaming, from disconcerting dreams. It's not so much the demands of her course load at the University of Sussex—Heidegger, Kierkegaard, Freud and friends—as it is Susanna's own experience with Nietzsche's great separation, or the sudden realization that everything... means nothing to you. Her boyfriend, Jason, an antiques dealer 10 years her senior, is stingy with affection. Which helps explain why Susanna falls for Rob, a brooding yet innocent-seeming classmate who frequents the dingy campus bars, digs a good protest and lives in dilapidated communal housing. Torn, Susanna opts to date both—it's the swinging '70s, after all—but the back-and-forth leaves her dizzy, and when she discovers she's pregnant and realizes the father could be either man, neither her tutor nor her girlfriends can assuage her. Fumbling through the smoky corridors and lofty ideals of academia, Susanna is, like so many student philosophers, equal parts endearing and insufferable, and even if her dilemma isn't the most original, Greig makes it uniquely hers. (May)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

Publishers Weekly

In her first novel, singer-songwriter and music journalist Greig examines the case of second-year philosophy student Susanna, who frequently wakes up, screaming, from disconcerting dreams. It’s not so much the demands of her course load at the University of Sussex—Heidegger, Kierkegaard, Freud and friends—as it is Susanna’s own experience with Nietzsche’s “great separation,” or the sudden realization that “everything... means nothing to you.” Her boyfriend, Jason, an antiques dealer 10 years her senior, is stingy with affection. Which helps explain why Susanna falls for Rob, a brooding yet innocent-seeming classmate who frequents the dingy campus bars, digs a good protest and lives in dilapidated communal housing. Torn, Susanna opts to date both—it’s the swinging ’70s, after all—but the back-and-forth leaves her dizzy, and when she discovers she’s pregnant and realizes the father could be either man, neither her tutor nor her girlfriends can assuage her. Fumbling through the smoky corridors and lofty ideals of academia, Susanna is, like so many student philosophers, equal parts endearing and insufferable, and even if her dilemma isn’t the most original, Greig makes it uniquely hers.


Kirkus Reviews

A distinctive coming-of-age tale from a talented debut novelist based in the U.K. Susannah Jones studies philosophy at Sussex University. She lives with Jason, an antiques dealer whose Brunswick Square flat offers a welcome respite from 1970s-era student squalor. Jason’s almost 30, and he provides Susannah with access to a more sophisticated lifestyle. But he treats her more like a child or a pet than the liberated woman she would like to be—or, for that matter, the thoughtful, earnestly questing person she already is. Their relationship is additionally complicated by Rob, a fellow student whose obvious interest...

Product Details

  • File Size: 3336 KB
  • Print Length: 287 pages
  • Publisher: Other Press; 1 edition (April 30, 2009)
  • Publication Date: May 12, 2009
  • Sold by: Penguin Random House Publisher Services
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00285RCHE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,264,409 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
In my head I've been wandering about, wondering if my academic career spent in the sciences has left a gaping hole in the philosophical and historical realm. It's true, it has, and I feel as if, now, I am running behind myself, trying to catch up.
So the title of this book enticed me, despite the thickly written back cover (which I still haven't read in its entirety) - very off-putting. And the start of the book is slowish- but I got completely pulled in by Susannah, a woman who screams herself awake, who dreams in multicoloured dreams where she has lengthy conversations with the philosophers she is studying. She is so real, and I'd love to have coffee with her.
She has a great inner debate in this book, as she comes to terms with what she wants in life and in those around her. Her father's death has crippled both her and her mother and she is struggling to resurface. As she does, she turns to the great philosophers and, while doing it, brings many of their teachings to life in a modern way.
I, of course, having wasted my education, have no idea if she is doing this properly. But it's enchanting and I buy it and now I actually want to read Kierkegaard. Especially after reading this quote about the Virgin Mary, which comes near the end of the book, "Yet what woman was done greater indignity than Mary, and isn't it true here that those whom God blesses he damns in the same breath?" (from Fear and Trembling)
A thoughtful, funny, wistful and truthful coming of age story, with an enticing smattering of philosophy.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This novel is an interesting mix of genre romance and a thoughtful, almost academic inquiry into being a young single woman in the 20th century. It follows Susannah, a young Welsh college student at school near London in the 1970s, for a few turbulent months in which she must look at what she is looking for in her life, and how men and relationships might fit into whatever that is. Often the novel falls back on typical plot negotiations (run-ins with the rival lovers), but spends a lot of time inside Susannah's head while she sorts out what it is she really wants out of life. Aiding Susannah in her thoughts are her philosophy studies which are sprinkled throughout, culminating in an interesting use of Kierkegaard in reasoning through the issue of abortion. Overall this is a thoughtful piece, well grounded in the politics and changing landscape of the 1970s, that will speak well to modern readers as it walks the line between serious literature and a genre "weekend" read.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
For the sake of full disclosure, let me begin by saying the author Charlotte Greig is an associate of mine, but she does not know I am writing this. I am responding to the previous reviewer, because it is obvious that the reviewer either didn't read the book or really wasn't paying attention. How on earth could that reviewer write this:

"I kept wondering throughout the book just how Modern European Philosophy really played a part in this story?"

"Throughout the book?" Really? When the protagonist is making major decisions about her relationships and pregnancy, she ponders Nietszche, Heidegger, and Kierkergaard, and the crux of their philosophies on life, specifically connection to the world and their lives. Very long paragraphs and many pages were spent on this, I guess these flew straight over the reviewer's head. When the reviewer admits that she kept wondering how "Modern European Philosophy" was involved in the story, it's like saying, "Gee, I read 'The Natural' by Bernard Malamud, but I kept wondering when Baseball was actually going to be a part of the story."

Reviews are all about opinions. The previous reviewer expressed hers and is entitled to them. But criticizing a text for something so blatantly not true is not warranted. When someone says "War and Peace stunk because there was no war in the book" then the record must be set straight; especially when it involves something so painfully obvious in the text.

I found the book amazingly insightful, and does what any good story should do when it deals with complicated matters such as relationships, pregnancy and abortion.
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I read this book because I teach philosophy to undergraduates, and I thought that it would be nice to be able to recommend or even teach a novel that took undergraduates, particularly women, seriously in the study of philosophy. This book does not do that. The title suggests that there will be a real interweaving of philosophy into the novel. As far as I can see, apart from some quotations and a bit of back-story, there really isn't any. There is a lot of 70s and a lot of sex. That's fine, if the title were "70s undergraduate woman has lots of sex and oh reads a bit too." But it isn't.

There was an earlier attempt at real philosophy in novel form, Sophies World. That one wasn't as good a novel as this one, but it was better at communicating philosophy. Then there was a book by David Lodge called Small World--which was an excellent novel and an excellent skewering of academia. This novel is as other readers have suggested. It is an easy passing of the time, marked out by some interesting 70s cultural references.

If you'd like a British version of That 70s Show, this is a fine book. If you'd like someone to give you a guide to modern european philosophy for women, I'd recommend someone who reads these books for a living--or just read Simone de Beauvoir's novels!
2 Comments 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

A Girl's Guide to Modern European Philosophy
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: A Girl's Guide to Modern European Philosophy