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Go Africa® Coffee Whole Bean - Dark Roast 250 Grams (8.81oz)

4.1 out of 5 stars 21 ratings

Price: $10.98 ($1.37 / Ounce) Get Fast, Free Shipping with Amazon Prime

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Item Form Whole Bean
Brand Go Africa
Flavor Coffee
Caffeine Content Caffeinated
Roast Level Dark_roast

About this item

  • Go Africa Coffee is a Premium African Coffee made with a unique blend of ancestral roasting and processing techniques handed down by Africans for over 2,000 years in order to yield the optimal balance of flavor, taste, and aroma
  • Perfect for Espressos, Lattes, French Press, Pleasure & Causal sipping
  • Blended African Coffee Beans
  • 100% Gourmet Coffee from one or more of following countries (Ethiopia, Kenya, Côte d'Ivoire, Tanzania, Cameroon, and Democratic Republic of the Congo).
  • Premium Whole Coffee Beans. 100% Organic and Fair Trade Compliant.

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Product Description

Go Africa Coffee is a Premium African Coffee made with a unique blend of ancestral roasting and processing techniques handed down by Africans for over 2,000 years in order to yield the optimal balance of flavor, taste, and aroma
Perfect for Espressos, Lattes, French Press, Pleasure & Causal sipping
Blended African Coffee Beans
100% Gourmet Coffee from one or more of following countries (Ethiopia, Kenya, Côte d'Ivoire, Tanzania, Cameroon, and Democratic Republic of the Congo).

Below is a detail description of each type and subclass of Coffee Beans grown in the various regions of Africa. Not all of Africa’s coffee production is limited to Robusta, however. Here’s an overview of the different coffee varieties that are grown frequently across the African continent (keep in mind that while some of these coffees are considered single origin in nature, most like Arabica and Robusta are not):

  • Sidamo:A type of Arabica (which you can find elsewhere in this list) grown as a single origin coffee source in Sidamo, Ethiopia, this variety of coffee is a small bean that produces a rich, spicy and almost chocolatey flavor. Individual types of Ethiopian Sidamo include Yirgachefe and Guji, both known to be of high quality. Another type of Ethiopian coffee is Harar, which is another Arabica but not grown in Sidamo. More on these types of coffees later.
  • Liberica:Coffea Liberica is a species separate from Arabica as well. It typically grows in the western areas of Africa – most notably Liberia. Liberica’s taste is closer to Robusta than that of Arabica, and the beans grow on trees that can grow as high as 10 to 15 meters tall. Gros Idente: Similar to Liberica, Gros Idente coffee is grown in large trees in the western areas of Africa, such as the Ivory Coast. Arabica:Yes, for all of our talk about Robusta growing in Africa, it can be easy to forget that Arabica coffee is also grown in Africa. Typically, the environments suited for growing Arabica in Africa are in mountainous areas – places like the mainland of the Ivory Coast and Cameroon are typical spots where Arabica coffee is grown. Excelsea:Like Liberica coffee, these trees grow high. In fact, they are also grown in the Ivory Coast which contributes to much of their similarities to Liberica and Gros Idente coffees. Robusta:Much of the African environment is suitable for Robusta growing, typically the lower-lying areas in the equatorial regions of Africa. Robusta is grown just about everywhere from Madagascar to Gabon – even if Vietnam is a leading producer of Robusta coffee, its African roots are hard to shake off. Kouilou and Petit Indenize:Grown inland along the Ivory Coast, these are actually smaller coffee trees. Bourbon:This type of coffee was already mentioned before, but its influence in African coffee is difficult to understate. Bourbon was planted in Reunion – an island off the eastern coast of Madagascar – in the 18th century. The type of coffee then mutated, producing Bourbon coffee, which was then moved around the world and cultivated in different areas. French Mission:This refers to a type of Bourbon coffee that was planted by French missionaries in areas of East Africa around the turn of the 20th century. A Kenyan type of this coffee known as K7 is also grown in Africa. Mayaguez:Another subset of Bourbon coffee, this coffee is grown in Rwanda. Typically, the Bourbon coffees planted in Africa are spread throughout the eastern portions of the continent and Madagascar.

Sidamo:A type of Arabica (which you can find elsewhere in this list) grown as a single origin coffee source in Sidamo, Ethiopia, this variety of coffee is a small bean that produces a rich, spicy and almost chocolatey flavor. Individual types of Ethiopian Sidamo include Yirgachefe and Guji, both known to be of high quality. Another type of Ethiopian coffee is Harar, which is another Arabica but not grown in Sidamo. More on these types of coffees later. Liberica:Coffea Liberica is a species separate from Arabica as well. It typically grows in the western areas of Africa – most notably Liberia. Liberica’s taste is closer to Robusta than that of Arabica, and the beans grow on trees that can grow as high as 10 to 15 meters tall.

  • Arabica:Yes, for all of our talk about Robusta growing in Africa, it can be easy to forget that Arabica coffee is also grown in Africa. Typically, the environments suited for growing Arabica in Africa are in mountainous areas – places like the mainland of the Ivory Coast and Cameroon are typical spots where Arabica coffee is grown.
  • Excelsea:Like Liberica coffee, these trees grow high. In fact, they are also grown in the Ivory Coast which contributes to much of their similarities to Liberica and Gros Idente coffees.
  • Robusta:Much of the African environment is suitable for Robusta growing, typically the lower-lying areas in the equatorial regions of Africa. Robusta is grown just about everywhere from Madagascar to Gabon – even if Vietnam is a leading producer of Robusta coffee, its African roots are hard to shake off.
  • Kouilou and Petit Indenize:Grown inland along the Ivory Coast, these are actually smaller coffee trees.
  • Bourbon:This type of coffee was already mentioned before, but its influence in African coffee is difficult to understate. Bourbon was planted in Reunion – an island off the eastern coast of Madagascar – in the 18th century. The type of coffee then mutated, producing Bourbon coffee, which was then moved around the world and cultivated in different areas.
  • French Mission:This refers to a type of Bourbon coffee that was planted by French missionaries in areas of East Africa around the turn of the 20th century. A Kenyan type of this coffee known as K7 is also grown in Africa.
  • Mayaguez:Another subset of Bourbon coffee, this coffee is grown in Rwanda. Typically, the Bourbon coffees planted in Africa are spread throughout the eastern portions of the continent and Madagascar.

Coffee Coffee 12oz (Whole Bean) Dark Roast

Go Africa Back

  • Go Africa Products are now a part of the subscribe and save Program!
    Go Africa Coffee in packaged in a special bag that ensures that you receive the freshest coffee possible.
  • Go Africa Coffee is a Premium African Coffee made with a unique blend of ancestral roasting and processing techniques handed down by Africans for over 2,000 years in order to yield the optimal balance of flavor, taste, and aroma
    Perfect for Espressos, Lattes, French Press, Pleasure & Causal sipping
    Blended African Coffee Beans
    100% Gourmet Coffee from one or more of following countries (Ethiopia, Kenya, Côte d'Ivoire, Tanzania, Cameroon, and Democratic Republic of the Congo).

    Premium Whole Coffee Beans
    Go Africa Products are now a part of the subscribe and save Program!

The types of Coffee Beans used in Go Africa Coffee

The types of Coffee Beans used in Go Africa Coffee

We have received so many inquiries regarding which beans are used in Go Africa Coffee. Since we source are beans from the following countries: (Ethiopia, Kenya, Côte d'Ivoire, Tanzania, Cameroon, and Democratic Republic of the Congo) the short answer is it depends.

We have asked our resident Coffeelogist and Chief Roaster, Losseni Kone, to help provide an answer.

Coffee aficionados of all levels have without a doubt heard the words “Robusta” or “Arabica” However, Coffee is much more complex than just type of Coffee.

Below is a list of Countries and Types of beans sourced from the country for Go Africa Coffee. Keep in mind a Country can source more than one type of bean:

  • Ethiopia: (Arabica, Sidamo (Yirgachefe and Guji))
  • Kenya: (Bourbon, French Mission)
  • Côte d'Ivoire (Arabica, Gros Idente, Excelsea, Kouilou and Petit Indenize)
  • Tanzania: (Robusta)
  • Cameroon: (Arabica)
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo: (Robusta)

What kind of coffee is produced in Africa?

What kind of coffee is produced in Africa?

Most African countries produce Robusta coffee, with a few having a mix of both Robusta and Arabica varieties. Countries producing Arabica coffee, especially the Colombian Mild will have a windfall in export earnings, which may lead to increased investments to boost output.

Africa is home to many of the finest African coffee beans in the world, fromEthiopia and Kenya in the East to Rwanda where top quality Arabica beans are cultivated to West African countries including Senegal and Cameroon where robusta coffee beans are mostly grown.

We’ll look briefly at some of the regions in this article: Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi. Though to be fair, coffee beans from Africaare widely cultivated throughout the continent, and even grows wild in many areas.

Ethiopia: Harrar, Ghimbi and Yirgacheffe

Ethiopia has three main regions that produce African coffee beans: Harrar, Ghimbi and Sidamo, or Yirgacheffe. Harrar beans come from small farms and are dry-processed. They are labeled “longberry” for large and “shortberry” for small or Mocha (which is the size of a peaberry).

The Ethiopian coffee has a strong dry edge, wine-like to fruity acidity, a rich aroma and heavy in body. In the best crops, you can smell blueberries or blackberries. Ethiopian is often used in espresso blends in order the capture the aromatics in the crema (the thin layer of foam atop an espresso).

Ghimi and Yirgacheffe produce washed coffees. The Ghimbi beans grown in western parts are more balanced, heavier and longer lasting body than the Harrars. The Yirgacheffe coffee bean is the most flavored of all the Ethiopian beans, grown in the southern part of the country. Mild, fruity and aromatic, you may see it labeled Sidamo, which refers to the district where it is grown and harvested.

Uganda: Shade grown

Uganda produces mostly Robusta beans that are typically used in instant coffees but the Arabica beans it does produce are similar to Kenyan coffee. The best Ugandan coffee comes from the western slopes of Mt. Elgon called Bugishu.

Robusta has been in Uganda for centuries and wild varieties of it still grow in Uganda’s rain forests. Both Robusta and Arabica trees are grown in the shade of banana trees and harvested about twice a year. 300,000 farmers grow coffee, which makes up 95% of the country’s exports.

Ugandan farmers grow mostly Robusta since it is easier for farmers with little money for equipment and none to hire help. The more well-off farmers can afford to farm Arabica, which is more work and more expensive but also pays off better. Ugandan Arabica is of medium intensity, sweet with a hint of the rustic, has a good body that is husky yet clean and makes an interesting espresso.

Considering the degree of geographical, environmental, and climate differences on a large continent like Africa, it’s not surprising that so many different varieties of coffee are produced there to some degree – including the world-popular Arabica. Coffee aficionados of all levels have without a doubt heard the words “Robusta” or “Arabica”. If you aren’t familiar with either, these two terms describe the two different species of beans grown commercially. They are the same in that when harvested, roasted and eventually brewed to become that magical thing we call coffee. However, that’s where the similarities end. Robusta and Arabica differ when it comes to taste, growing environments and quality: Taste Robusta has a neutral to harsh taste range and is often likened to having an “oatmeal-like” taste. When unroasted, the smell of Robusta beans is described as raw-peanutty. Arabicas, on the other hand, have a very wide taste range (depending on its varietal). The range differs from sweet-soft to sharp-tangy. When unroasted, Arabica beans smell like blueberries. Their roasted smell is described as perfumey with notes of fruit and sugar tones. Growing environments Robusta coffee beans come from a resilient plant that is able to be grown in low altitudes of 200-800 meters. Robusta beans aren’t very susceptible to damage done by pests. Additionally, they produce more finished product per acre and require fairly low production costs. Contrariwise, Arabica coffee beans are fragile and must grow in cool, subtropical climates. Arabica beans also need a lot of moisture, rich soil, shade and sun. Because of their fragility, Arabica beans are vulnerable to attack from various pests and can be damaged by cold temperatures or poor handling. This type of bean also needs to be grown at a higher elevation (600-2000 meters). Which bean is better? No contest! If you had to choose between an Arabica bean and a Robusta bean, it’s important to always choose Arabica. Robusta fosters use mono-cropping, the practice of growing the same plant every year in one place. It yields more space since it involves clear-cutting the forest for the crop. Because Robusta is more a resilient plant than the delicate Arabica, it can be grown in more places. Large coffee companies buy huge amounts of rainforest, clear-cut the land and plant Robusta beans. Robusta is often mixed with Arabica, allowing the coffee companies to save a pretty penny and serve you a crappy cup. Not to mention, mono-cropping, when done excessively, also erodes soil and demolishes nutrients making the soil nearly unusable.

More details and preparation (How to Grind Coffee)

How to Grind Coffee

KNOW YOUR GRIND

Your coffee grind has a big impact on the quality of your brew. What's the right grind size? It depends on how you brew your coffee! And since there are a lot of different ways to brew a delicious cup, we decided to make you this handy guide so you could explore them all.

For the examples provided we used a burr grinder, which is great because it gives a nice consistent grind. But if you only have a blade grinder, don't despair - just get as close as possible. We've heard that giving a blade grinder a good shake while grinding can help even things out.

DID YOU KNOW?

The oils that give a coffee its most beautiful notes evaporate very quickly after you grind the beans. So, for the most delicious cup, try grinding just enough for what you're about to brew.

See our guides to learn how to brew the perfect cup, every time.

Coffee Grinders:

It’s practically unanimous: every great cup of coffee starts with freshly ground coffee. And when I say fresh, I mean grinding your beans just moments before brewing. Too much trouble, you say? Nonsense! Poppycock! Where shall we begin?

We’ll start with the two basic types of grinders and the notable variations within.

Blade Grinders

That high-speed whir heard round the world each morning is a blade grinder. These are the cheapest grinders for general-purpose coffee making. They come with perky names like Krups or Braun. You probably have one. You shouldn’t. Perhaps you should relegate it to grinding Grandpa’s gruel. They can be very handy but they are not always precise and I do not recommend them. They horribly hack and slice your beans, leaving an uneven grind with course and fine particles in the same batch. The motors run hot; grinding too long can scorch the coffee.

• Burr Grinders

For a step up in precision, now we're moving in the right direction, tally-ho! Burr grinders are the answer to a more perfect union of bean and grind. Disk (a.k.a. plate) and conical burr grinders are your basic choices. Flat disk grinders use two spinning disks to smash the coffee into precise uniform grinds. Precision is good for home use; you can even get a truly fine espresso grind. But, alas, they can also run hot and, if not careful, can scorch the beans.

• Conical Burr Grinders

These are a bit more expensive, but are the choice of both coffee professionals and enthusiasts alike and well worth it These are the workhorses. Precision grinds, even for Turkish coffee, and a slow, cool motor.

• Hand Grinders

If you’re both counting pennies and are also in need of a way to work out your flabby upper arms, perhaps you could try a hand grinder. They work on the same principle, except your arm substitutes for an electric motor. Watch those biceps bulge! The trouble here is that it takes an awful lot of effort to get even a small brew under way and in that time you could be drinking coffee.

The Various Grinds:

• Coarse

This type of grind leaves the largest granules of coffee and is preferred for French Presses (a.k.a. plungers) or the percolator method of brewing.

• Medium

Medium grinds have a consistency of granulated sugar and are primarily recommended for vacuum and certain types of drip coffee makers. Because of its versatile size, it can also be used for other brewing methods, but not espresso.

• Fine

Also known as an espresso grind, this is a grind with a powdery/mealy consistency used in espresso makers and Neapolitan flip-drips though electric drip and filter brews can use it as well.

• Pulverized

Like fine flour, this extremely fine grind is the province of Turkish coffee and usually needs to be ground in a special grinder.

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Product details

  • Is Discontinued By Manufacturer ‏ : ‎ No
  • Product Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 3.54 x 5.91 x 9.06 inches; 8 Ounces
  • UPC ‏ : ‎ 019962576140 850537008020
  • Manufacturer ‏ : ‎ Go Africa® LLC
  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ B079QL9WFQ
  • Country of Origin ‏ : ‎ USA
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.1 out of 5 stars 21 ratings