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Go Away White [Vinyl]

3.7 out of 5 stars 54 customer reviews

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Vinyl, March 4, 2008
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Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Too Much 21st Century
  2. Adrenalin
  3. Undone
  4. International Bulletproof Talent
  5. Endless Summer of the Damned
  6. Saved
  7. Mirror Remains
  8. Black Stone Heart
  9. The Dog's a Vapour
  10. Zikir


Product Details

  • Vinyl (March 4, 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Bauhaus Music
  • ASIN: B00133KHD8
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #628,853 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Well, after 25 years without a new album release, its no wonder the mixed reviews for the new (and apparently final) Bauhaus album. Expectations were high. I've been a Bauhaus fan for about ten years and have had their older albums for a long time and I'm familiar with how they USED to sound. I'm a music lover who loves change from artists I appreciate and Bauhaus is no different. I wouldn't have wanted Go Away White to sound like Mask or Burning From The Inside and luckily it doesn't. Go Away White sounds like a garage-rock album, but with clarity. David J's bass is thick and audible, Daniel Ash's guitars are loud and crunchy, and Kevin Haskin's drums are solid and deep. Peter Murphy is as dramatic and crooning as ever. I personally think this album rocks. It's a modern rock "n" roll album with a vintage feel and deserves to be played loud. The only track I found unecessary was the last track, which really wasn't music at all.

Bottom line, the last time this band made new music was 25 freakin' years ago, so why even bother making comparisons? This album stands on its own and I think it's a great record worth repeated listens. Its dark, rockin', and dramatic and that's the way I've always loved Bauhaus. Highlights are Adrenalin, Endless Summer Of The Damned, The Dog's A Vapour , and Saved (weird song but gooood). Fans of the Bauhaus of old owe it to themselves to check this album out. Definitely THE surprise release of 2008 and probably the last decade.

P.S. I don't know about the rest of you guys who actually bought the cd, but I got a cool sticker with mine. Enjoy.
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Format: Audio CD
To me, this is how Bauhaus would sound if Peter hadn't gotten sick and had completed Burning from the Inside. No Love and Rockets as we know it, no Tones on Tail, no Peter Murphy solo projects...or at least not as early as they had arrived. The boys seem to have picked up where they left off, but with 25 years worth of maturity and experience under their collective belt.

While they seem to drift a bit to somewhat familiar waters with a late 90's Love and Rockets feel to "Too Much 21st Century", every song after that gave me that same quiver in my stomach I got when I first picked up "In The Flat Field" as a college kid in the '80's. Each song is mystery to be discovered and unwound with each successive listen. Trace elements of the scars of their 25 years journey become evident to the truest of Bauhaus fans and that's ok because they've never strayed far from their roots in any of their incarnations. So here we have it. The final album. It IS Bauhaus and it's Bauhaus as they have always been and will always be.
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Format: Audio CD
It's been 25 years since Bauhaus released a studio record (1983's Burning from the Inside). In the intervening time, the band has been busy with vocalist Peter Murphy pursuing a solo career and the rest of the band-- guitarist Daniel Ash, bassist David J and drummer Kevin Haskins finding fame as Love & Rockets. After a handful of reunion tours (the first of which documented on Gotham) and persistent rumors of an album, "Go Away White" has finally arrived, the band's "farewell" record (yeah, we've heard that before). But like I said, it's been 25 years since these guys have gone in the studio to record new material-- goth and new wave (and contrary to popular assessment, Bauhaus straddled both camps) have run their course and spawned their children in the various alternative movements of the past 20 years and glam music had been reduced to a bunch of guys with eye liner and trashy metal riffs before collapsing.

So it's into this that Bauhaus' new album arrives, and one thing I can say-- you can't go home again. The music of Bauhaus in the late '70s and early '80s was unique, powerful and of its time. It stands on its own but one fears any effort to recapture that glory would fall flat-- mind you, it'd draw its armies of praise from the retro crowd, but in five years, it'd be a record collecting dust like other similar projects. Happily, Bauhaus did not pursue this route, instead turning out something entirely new.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Some will call this album brilliant just because it's Bauhaus .
Bauhaus have always been a combination of moments of complete self indulgence interspersed through some of the best songs ever .
Take away the best songs ever and that's what your left with here .
There are a few decent moments ( The Dogs A Vapour) .
But I think the individual members have had too long to follow their own sound - some of these songs sound like Love and Rockets with Pete singing .The undercurrent of menace and anger has completely gone .
Maybe being such a huge fan of their work my expectations were too high
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Format: Audio CD
It's impossible to think that after a 25 year absence, that Bauhaus would return to make a studio album of (almost) all new material. Sure all of the performers have had another things to do like Tones On Tail, Love & Rockets, various solo albums, and even working with Perry Farrell, but Bauhaus, as a whole, hasn't recorded since 1983's 'Burning From The Inside.' 2008's 'Go Away White' almost feels like if the four guys got together and said, "hey, what if we decided to fuse Love & Rockets, Tones On Tail, and some of Peter's later solo albums into one record with almost no traces of our work as Bauhaus 25 years ago?" I can even hear some traces of Dali's Car, an obscure Murphy/Mick Karn side project. The results are satisfying, but confusing at the same time.

The first five tracks are all guitar riff-driven glam rockers that are closer cousins to 'Kundalini Express' than to 'Double Dare'. 'Zikir' particularly sounds like something off of Murphy's album, 'Dust', with its droning almost-Dead Can Dance sound. 'Saved' is a very interesting artrock drone, catching them at their most gloomy since 'Mask', where 'Black Stone Heart' is the closest thing to Tones On Tail since, well...Tones On Tail. Lyrically, Murphy might spew out a few references to crimson spots or burning bodies, but the lyrics are definitely more lightweight than say, oh, 'Stigmata Martyr'. 'Endless Summer Of The Damned' even refers to global warming; very 2008, Pete. Soundwise, the album moves like a downward spiral, starting out with the Bowie-esque rockers and spiraling down to the atmospheric dirges ('The Dog's A Vapour' makes a reappearance after being a bonus track before, in a re-recorded form).
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