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God Emperor of Dune (Dune Chronicles) Hardcover – September 2, 2008

4.1 out of 5 stars 330 customer reviews
Book 4 of 8 in the Dune Series

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Hardcover, September 2, 2008
$109.48 $23.99

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"RICH FARE. HEADY STUFF".

-- Los Angeles Times --This text refers to the School & Library Binding edition.

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Product Details

  • Series: Dune Chronicles (Book 4)
  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Ace; Reprint edition (September 2, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0441016316
  • ISBN-13: 978-0441016310
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 2.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (330 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,543,629 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
A text whose depth of religious, historical, philosophical and emotional insights touch at the very essence of what humanity is. As someone who has read the 6-books of the Dune series more than 7-times each, I find God Emperor to be a gifted presentation set within the perspective of a truly unique point-of-view. As with the entire Dune series, Herbert forces us to focus within ourselves to answer the deeper questions and issues raised so masterfully in his book. The relationship and dialogues between the God Emperor Leto, and Moneo, his Majordomo has to be some of the most insightful, honest theater in Si-Fi history. From the silent obeyance of the massive Nayla, or the fostered rebellious attitudes of Siona, the shimmering `Golden Path' that will finally and forever perpetuate humankind in the Universe has been set into place personally by Paul Atreides' son Leto. With Leto's selfless sacrifice of an unimaginable 3,500-years, his metamorphosis of worm and man; man and God, legend and religion with his logical-brilliance of the all-female "Women of the Imperial Guard", the Fish Speaker Army that holds an iron-grip on the human universe- Herbert creates the single most enjoyable, readable, profound, and meaningful book in his timeless collection. This book also ties the Paul Atreides side of the Dune series to the Bene Gesserit-led books in a singular, keystone fashion. The development of the Ixians, and the Tleilaxu; the downgrading of the Guild, and the Bene Gesserit and the extermination of CHOAM and the Great Houses add a great deal to both the overall and continuing plot lines of the Dune series. More so than the rest of the series, this book forces a closer examination of religious, social and interpersonal beliefs, and in a truly long-term thinking frame.Read more ›
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By A Customer on August 12, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
First, let me get this out of the way. If youwere annoyed by some of the abstruse and occasionally pretentious dialogue in the first three books (esoecially the third) then you won't like this book in all probability. If you love action and excitement and an intense plot, and thats what youre looking for, you won't like this book in all probabilty.
That said, this book is easily the best book in the Dune series (only the first can compete; and that is because it sets up the world). The setting is a quantum leap from the first one; there is virtually no connection to the petty feuding world of Dune, with the intense Fremen and their intense culture.
This book revolves around 5 characters: Hwi Noree, Siona, Moneo, Leto II and Duncan Idaho, the ever present ghola. The idea of Duncan Idaho being constantly resurrected struck me as as an interesting conceit, and it played well into the story (Leto's psychological analysis of Duncan based on his resurrections is also interesting).
Of these five characters, Moneo and Leto are easily the most interesting. They form a perfect foil- Leto, so intelligent and so far beyond the normal human awareness that his thoughts cant help being nearly incomprehensible, and Moneo, the former rebel who was converted by his visions of the Golden Path and is now staid in his duty and unquestioning in his belief.
Figuring out what exactly the Golden Path is- the path that Maud'Dib could not bring himself to contemplate and that Leto took upon himself in place of Ghanima- is a tussle.
It is an immensely enjoyable tussle, however. Leto seems to be saying, by being the ultimate power-holder and despot of this universe, I accomplish too things.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is what the whole series is all about right here. Paul Muad'Dib was a failed messiah. Failed because he locked himself into a future that he could not stand to be a part of. Like his father, young Leto II also saw the path that his father fled from. But in looking deeper into that future saw the only way to save humankind from itself. The Golden Path. This book is set smack-dab in the middle of that golden path. Deeply religious and philosophical undertones drive this book right to the top of my personal best list. If I had to pick only one book that truly changed my perspective and deepened my thinking it has to be this book. Leto is a very rich character unparalled in any other series. Frank Herbert took the ideal of a higher power and what it must be like to be that power, and humanized it for all to disect and study. True Genius. If you're looking for the action of the first book, God Emperor might dissapoint you. Though there is action, it is the dialogue of this book that makes it the timeless perfection that it is. So if you want to take your mind on a consciousness expanding ride, curl up with this book and enjoy.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Frank Herbert did a good job in the 436 pages of "God Emperor of Dune" of burying his actual story. The story, what little of it he actually presents, is an interesting one. But, it's almost entirely swamped by his repeated, constant, discussion of philosophy and by his stunting of his characters (there's absolutely no growth in any of the characters and, after a while, their constant repetitions of their one behavior just grates). I'll condense the book (without spoilers) below:

:START
Leto: "Oh, what I've given up for the Golden Path." [insert pages of oracular philosophizing and a few obscure aphorisms]
Hwi: "Dear one, how I love you."
Siona: "I'll get you, you evil worm!"
Duncan: "You're not a true Atreides. OMG, deviant intimate behavior!"
Moneo: "Sorry, Lord. I don't understand. Oh no, the Worm approaches!" [grovel, grovel, cringe, cringe]
Nayla: "This must be a test. But, I must obey the Lord."
GOTO START

I'm rating this book at merely and OK 3 stars out of 5, but I was leaning heavily towards a lower rating. What saved it is simply that it does give a sort of tie-up for Leto's sacrifice back in "Children of Dune." If Herbert had cut out a couple of hundred pages worth of waxing philosophic, put a sentence or two in Leto's mouth that actually made sense, and grown the characters toward some kind of reasonableness, this could have been a pretty good book. But, as it is, I'm not all that enamored of it.

And to help people find all the books in the original Dune series (i.e., when Frank Herbert was still alive):
1. Dune (40th Anniversary Edition) (Dune Chronicles, Book 1)
2.
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