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God and Phenomenal Consciousness: A Novel Approach to Knowledge Arguments Hardcover – Bargain Price, February 18, 2008

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Editorial Reviews

Book Description

This book bridges debates in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of religion through its defence of 'non-theoretical physicalism'. It proposes novel objections to Thomas Nagel's and Frank Jackson's arguments against physicalism about consciousness by appealing to the author's own objections to certain arguments against the existence of God.

About the Author

Yujin Nagasawa is Lecturer in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Birmingham and Honorary Research Fellow at the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics at the Australian National University. He is the author of numerous journal articles and co-editor of There's Something About Mary: Essays on Phenomenal Consciousness and Frank Jackson's Knowledge Argument and New Waves in Philosophy of Religion.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (February 18, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521879663
  • ASIN: B008SMIJJ6
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,667,935 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Hardcover
This book investigates knowledge arguments in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of religion. The knowledge arguments in the philosophy of mind are arguments against materialism, and the knowledge arguments in the philosophy of religion are arguments against the existence of God. Nagasawa argues that none of these arguments are successful, and develops his own theory of the human mind and the divine mind.
The knowledge arguments in the philosophy of mind are the arguments of Nagel and Jackson. Very roughly, these arguments purport to show that we could know everything there is to know about the material brain without knowing everything about the subject's psychological states (particularly what it is like to be in conscious states), and conclude that there is more to such states than the material states of the brain.
The knowledge arguments in the philosophy of religion include an argument from Grim and various arguments about concept possession. Very roughly, these arguments purport to show that God could not know various facts because of his attributes (for example, his omnipotence precludes his knowing what fear is like). The arguments conclude that God could not be omniscient, and so could not exist.
Nagasawa first explains what makes an argument a knowledge argument, and why these arguments are knowledge arguments. He then presents the knowledge arguments in philosophy of religion and philosophy of mind and evaluates them by comparing and contrasting them. Finally, he argues that his criticisms support a novel theory, non-theoretical physicalism.
This book makes original and important contributions to philosophy of mind and philosophy of religion, and integrates work in these fields in insightful ways.
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