Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.99
  • Save: $3.02 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Godforsaken: Bad Things H... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Clean cover and pages. No highlighting, writing, or stickers. Stored and shipped in protective shrink wrap! Amazon Fast Shipping! Fulfilled by Amazon!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Godforsaken: Bad Things Happen. Is there a God who cares? Yes. Here's proof. Hardcover – March 1, 2012

4.1 out of 5 stars 115 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$21.97
$7.75 $3.39

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
$21.97 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Godforsaken: Bad Things Happen. Is there a God who cares? Yes. Here's proof.
  • +
  • What's So Great about Christianity
  • +
  • America: Imagine a World without Her
Total price: $51.61
Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.; Reprint edition (March 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1414324855
  • ISBN-13: 978-1414324852
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 0.9 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (115 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #85,468 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Daniel Greene VINE VOICE on February 19, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Dinesh D'Souza claims that the motivation behind much of atheism is not from a genuine disbelief in a god, rather it is an anger and bewilderment stemming from an inability to reconcile the simultaneous existence of an allegedly all-powerful and all-loving God along with the presence of evil and suffering in the world. Atheists argue that such a god must be impotent, cruel or likely non-existent. Drawing from cultural anthropology, science, theology, and philosophy, D'Souza attempts to refute these claims by providing an explanation for the possibility of the coexistence of both suffering and the omnipotent God.

D'Souza begins by discussing how suffering is viewed in different cultures, traditions and religions. He points out that people in third world countries struggle with suffering much more so than people in western nations, yet religious faith abounds for the former and is in decline for the latter. He believes this may be due to how prosperity gives one the sense that they are self-sufficient; yet poor people feel compelled to depend on a higher power. D'Souza introduces this idea to later suggest that suffering's purpose may be to draw people into a closer relationship with God. Perhaps, but why is suffering possible and permissible with an omnipotent, all loving God; and if God wants a relationship, are there not other ways to do it without suffering? D'Souza delivers answers to these questions.

Much of D'Souza's arguments rest on two important ideas: the scientific concept of the anthropic principle; and the limits of omnipotence. The anthropic principle is the notion that the universe, given its vastness, immensity, age, and complexity is perfect, finely tuned and all exactly necessary for the existence of moral beings called humans.
Read more ›
10 Comments 139 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The constant debate between Christians and Atheists seems to always to orbit around the problem of a benevolent God with the reality of a broken, evil world. While this struggle has been going on for centuries, D'Souza brings some fresh perspective to the table, invoking modern day science as proof for theism. At first blush, this may seem counterintuitive, but D'Souza's arguments are balanced and compelling. These insights would have inspired a 5 star review from me, that is, until I got to the last chapter of the book which talked about the afterlife. Here, D'Souza completely drops his logic utilized in the first 90% of his book and goes with a typical Evangelical pat answer. There is a tremendous amount of good in this book that should be praised. With that being said, there is some ugly in this book that needs to be addressed.

The Good
The biggest issue in defending the Christian faith is the problem of theodicy. Why did an all loving, all powerful creator make a world with so much pain and evil? This is typically the biggest arguing point from atheists and their concerns are legitimate. Yet D'Souza fearlessly tackles these concerns using empirical evidence from modern sciences like Astronomy, Biology and Geology. Many of his arguments are nothing incredibly new - he employs many of the typical free will defense logics and things like the anthropic view of the Universe in his case. However, while many of his arguments are often used to defend the existence of God, he uses them in a way to reconcile the problems between an all loving God and a suffering world. In modern Christianity, where tragedy and suffering is gratuitously met with the pat answer of, "it was God's will", D'Souza's wonderful perspective is badly needed.
Read more ›
11 Comments 56 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For a lot of people, the biggest question about God is not, surprisingly enough, whether he exists. Instead, it is about whether God is truly good. Dinesh D'Souza, in his debates with leading atheists, quickly realized that many of those debates revolved around the question of evil in this world--how God could create a world that allowed such suffering and evil. In Godforsaken, Dinesh D'Souza takes these questions head on: Does God act like a tyrant? Is God really responsible for the evil in this world? Why is there suffering in the world? For the first time ever, Dinesh D'Souza approaches this topic with historical and scientific proof and presents to the reader why God is truly worthy of our worship and love.

Godforsaken was a carefully researched book that really spoke to both the intellectual and emotional side of any person, Christian or otherwise. Dinesh D'Souza broke his book into six parts. The first part is an introduction to the reality of suffering in this world and how all people groups everywhere at some point both experience and struggle with suffering and evil. The second part quickly yet thoroughly analyzes the typical Christian and atheist both approach the conundrum of how a good God can exist and yet the reality that there is evil and suffering in this world. This part also shows how each Christian and atheist argument is flawed and cannot truly satisfy people's questions about evil and suffering. The third part addresses the moral evils that exist in this world as pertains to both people's free will, God's sovereignty, and the consequences of a fallen world. The fourth part of Godforsaken looks at the crimes that occur in nature and how those relate to the power and character of God.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Godforsaken: Bad Things Happen. Is there a God who cares? Yes. Here's proof.
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Godforsaken: Bad Things Happen. Is there a God who cares? Yes. Here's proof.