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The Gods Delight: The Human Figure in Classical Bronze (Cleveland Museum of Art)

5.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0910386937
ISBN-10: 0910386935
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Product Details

  • Series: Cleveland Museum of Art
  • Hardcover: 387 pages
  • Publisher: Cleveland Museum of Art (November 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0910386935
  • ISBN-13: 978-0910386937
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 9.2 x 11.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,084,772 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Hardcover
"Gods' Delight", an exhibition of ancient small bronzes, is one of the "sleepers" of ancient art history, for specialists and general readers alike. In Greco-Roman studies, exhibitions of the so-called "minor arts" often produce the best art history, when scholars explore the evolution and meaning of ancient forms across media and contexts. (Compare "Glass of the Caesars", "Hellenistic Art in the Walters Art Gallery", and "The Age of Spirituality".) This book has pride of place on my own reference shelves. One could almost make it a textbook for sculpture and the history of taste. (Few standard surveys have a map or timeline - from this book I often xerox for lecture courses the 4 map pages, and the 8-page historical timeline to ancient politics and culture. ) Many American museums shared their finest: it is fitting, also, that a show which explores why and how art was privately patronized draws on some modern private holdings (Levy-White, Fleischmann and Christos Bastis collections). The color and B/W photographs set a high standard for evocative images of metal sculpture; they almost fall out of the page into one's hand, the way they originally cherished. The preface reviews bronze technology, the cultural habits generating Greco-Roman sculpture, and the development of private ownership out of habits of religious dedication. Each segment ( pre-Roman Greek, Etruscan, and Roman-era), is prefaced by a richly illustrated essay; the well-annotated catalogue entries tend to 3-6 pages each. (The contributing connoisseur-curators are also good narrators!)
The bronzes come from a thousand years (8th-c. BCE to 3rd c.
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Format: Paperback
"Gods' Delight", an exhibition of ancient small bronzes, is one of the "sleepers" of ancient art history, for specialists and general readers alike. In Greco-Roman studies, exhibitions of the so-called "minor arts" often produce the best art history, when scholars explore the evolution and meaning of ancient forms across media and contexts. (Compare "Glass of the Caesars", "Hellenistic Art in the Walters Art Gallery", and "The Age of Spirituality".) This book has pride of place on my own reference shelves. One could almost make it a textbook for sculpture and the history of taste. (Few standard surveys have a map or timeline - from this book I often xerox for lecture courses the 4 map pages, and the 8-page historical timeline to ancient politics and culture. ) Many American museums shared their finest: it is fitting, also, that a show which explores why and how art was privately patronized draws on some modern private holdings (Levy-White, Fleischmann and Christos Bastis collections). The color and B/W photographs set a high standard for evocative images of metal sculpture; they almost fall out of the page into one's hand, the way they originally cherished. The preface reviews bronze technology, the cultural habits generating Greco-Roman sculpture, and the development of private ownership out of habits of religious dedication. Each segment ( pre-Roman Greek, Etruscan, and Roman-era), is prefaced by a richly illustrated essay; the well-annotated catalogue entries tend to 3-6 pages each. (The contributing connoisseur-curators are also good narrators!)
The bronzes come from a thousand years (8th-c. BCE to 3rd c.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
it is now over 20 years since this exhibit traveled to several museums. a significant number of the pieces can be seen at the cleveland museum or the metropolitan museum (nyc). however, the photographs in the book are detailed and exquisite. they show greek, etruscan and roman small (hand-holdable) bronze figures over the "classical" period of five hundred years. as kuttner remarks, there is excellent coverage of time (charts) and space (maps). so the catalog can be used as a primary reference for this personal and permanent form of art. beyond that, as john russell noted in his contemporary review in the new york times, many of the pieces are simply gorgeous.
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