Buy New
$12.88
& FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by Outlet Promotions and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Goldwyn Follies has been added to your Cart
Trade in your item
Get up to a $0.69
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Goldwyn Follies

3.6 out of 5 stars 28 customer reviews

Additional DVD options Edition Discs
Price
New from Used from
DVD
(Apr 07, 2009)
"Please retry"
1
$12.88
$12.88 $3.00

Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream thousands of movies & TV shows included with Prime. Start your free trial
$12.88 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by Outlet Promotions and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Goldwyn Follies
  • +
  • The Big Broadcast of 1938 / College Swing Double Feature
Total price: $22.87
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Samuel Goldwyn's first and last attempt to emulate the Ziegfeld Follies in cinimatic form. A grand scale review of music, comedy and dance starring Kenny Baker, Edgar Bergen & Charlie McCarthy, The Ritz Brothers, and more.

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Adolphe Menjou, Edgar Bergen
  • Format: Color, Dubbed, Full Screen, NTSC, Subtitled
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Dubbed: French, Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    NR
    Not Rated
  • Studio: MGM (Video & DVD)
  • DVD Release Date: April 7, 2009
  • Run Time: 122 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001PPLINC
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #57,069 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Lawrence L. Smith on April 8, 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I was delighted to see the new DVD release. For the first time, this movie has been transferred to show how great the true Technicolor process was. There are subtle shades of color seldom seen in today's color processes. As for the picture itself, it is a mixed blessing with some great musical numbers and good comedy routines. Some of it is "slow" but keep in mind that it is 1938. For a dyed-in-the-wool movie buff (like me), it is a real treat seeing Vera Zorina, Charlie McCarthy and the Ritz Brothers in their heyday.
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
One thing you can say about Sam Goldwyn's ventures into musicals. He could either hit them out of the park ("Whoopee", "Palmy Days", "The Kid From Spain", etc.), he could miss completely ("One Heavenly Night"), or he could come up with a film that really is a bit of a mess but enjoyable for the classic film lover. The problem here seems to be that the film is trying to imitate to some degree the Warner Busby Berkeley films of 1933, the problem being that it is five years later. You'd think that of all people Goldwyn would have gotten that, since Busby Berkeley was directing his dance numbers in his Eddie Cantor films before Warner Bros. got a hold of him. Kenny Baker is obviously trying to stand in for Dick Powell, and he's good enough, it's just that musicals were transitioning to a different phase by 1938, the year this film was released. Thus the backstage banter between chorus girls doesn't come off very well after the code. The Ritz Bros. are obviously trying to stand in for the Marx Bros. and they do have a funny routine about a cat, but in the end they do get a bit tiresome. The film does have the dashing Adolphe Menjou, and he improves just about every film he's in including this one. The Technicolor is gorgeous and the Gershwin music is wonderful.

However, the modern viewer has one strategic advantage over the viewer that saw this in the first-run. We're not trapped in the perspective of a 1938 movie-goer so we can enjoy the film for what it is - some great musical numbers with a little good comedy and a lot of silliness.

One thing I don't get. This film first appeared on DVD as part of the giant Hollywood Musicals Collection late in 2008.
Read more ›
3 Comments 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
Probably the only reason for remembering The Goldwyn Follies is that it's the movie George Gershwin was working on when he died at 38 of a brain tumor. In truth, the movie is a mish-mash, although a good-natured one, involving comedy bits, musical numbers and what Sam Goldwyn considered "class." The best thing about the film are two George and Ira Gershwin songs that are as fresh and wise today as when they were written, "Our Love Is Here to Stay" and "Love Walked In." The story line is as thin as a thread, designed to keep the numbers coming and to provide some fun at Hollywood's expense. Ben Hecht is credited with the screenplay. He artfully places some banderillas that probably puckered the skin of several types of Hollywood denizens, from producers to divas to sycophants to...you get the idea.

Hollywood producer Oliver Merlin (Adolphe Menjou) has convinced himself he needs someone to tell him honestly about the new movie he's working on, someone who will represent the big audience out there. On a location shoot he meets a young woman who fits the bill. She's Hazel Dawes (Andrea Leeds), gentle, sincere and honest. "I'm a producer of movies," he tells her. "I get my wagonloads of poets and dramatists, but I can't buy common sense. I cannot buy humanity!" "Well, I don't know why, Mr. Merlin. There's an awful lot of it," Hazel says. Merlin looks at her impatiently. "Yes, I know," he says, "but the moment I buy it, it turns into something else, usually genius, and it isn't worth a dime. Now, if you could stay just as simple as you are, you'd be invaluable to me. I'll put you on my staff. I'll give you a title, 'Miss Humanity.' Don't rush, you can finish your ice cream soda." Merlin brings her to Hollywood and consults her on everything from script changes to plot developments.
Read more ›
1 Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: VHS Tape
THE GOLDWYN FOLLIES(1938) is an excellent account of the madness of moviemaking. It`s all here; the hysteria, the intrigues, the fun, the egotism, the worries before an opening etc. VERA ZORINA(Eva Brigitta Hartwig), a Norwegian ballet dancer delivers in her filmdebut, a funny and campy incarnation of a r u s s i a n and TEMPERAMENTEL ballerina. The Ritz Brothers has a humour that is way passed the line - and it still works. The same goes for Edgar Bergen and the doll Charlie. Kenny Baker is DULLLLLLLL, and sings the same song thrice too many, as are Andrea Leeds. She`s too goody goody. Adolphe Menjou is a mogul par excellence and the production numbers are spectacular.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The Goldwyn Follies has always been considered a mess since it first opened and lost a considerable amount of money for the studio. Directed by George Marshall and written by an endless procession of fired writers before a final rewrite by Ben Hecht, its faults lie mostly with Goldwyn himself. Goldwyn specialized in expensive, quality pictures and this was meant to be his magnum opus in 1938. He chose a revue format that really belonged back in the days of the Broadway Melody films of the early thirties and that seemed old even in '38. His concept of quality was a little too high toned for the general public and he filled the film with too much opera and ballet for their tastes. He included what he felt were crowd-pleasing acts which resulted in such major shifts of tone as going from La Traviata to the Ritz Brothers. Instead of hiring numerous acts he relied on too many appearances of The Ritz Brothers as well as Edgar Bergen & Charlie McCarthy for light filler. Bringing in so many of the best from Gershwin to Ballanchine, the result is woefully short of what it should have been.

But there are many really good things within this strange stew. The actors of the little romantic drama that sets up the thin plot are all quite wonderful. Adolphe Menjou is funny and paternal as Oliver Merlin, the producer who fears he's lost his touch and Andrea Leeds in one of her rare performances is sweet, natural and charming as Hazel Dawes, the girl next door ('Miss Humanity" to him) who he hires to critique his new film, "The Forgotten Dance" as it is made. Kenny Baker, fresh from jack Benny's radio show is perfect as the boy next door, Danny Baker, "The last of the lunchwagon tenors" who premiers George Gershwin's last two songs, Love Walked In and Love is Here To Stay.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums



What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customers Also Watched on Amazon Video