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Comment: Ex-library book. The item shows wear from consistent use, but it remains in good condition and works perfectly. All pages and cover are intact (including the dust cover, if applicable). Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting.
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Good Girls Don't Get Fat: How Weight Obsession Is Messing Up Our Girls and How We Can Help Them Thrive Despite It Paperback – September 21, 2010

4.5 out of 5 stars 38 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this straightforward guide, Silverman explores weight obsession in teenage girls, outlining ways that parents can help their daughters succeed in a "thin-is-in" world. Silverman had previously compiled "The Good Girls' Weight Rules" list of negative beliefs that society pushes on girls, such as "my emotions should depend on how fat I feel" and "I strive for size zero." She believes that girls should be taught to swap these harmful ideas for positive mottos (which she calls "Asset Girls' Ten Commandments) stressing confidence and achievements. Silverman outlines the causes behind an unhealthy body image and what parents can do to combat it, interspersing her advice with quizzes and stories from teens she's interviewed. Focusing mainly on mothers and daughters, Silverman also explores ways that fathers can reinforce a positive body image. Although the book contains plenty of sound advice, the breezy messages can border on hokey, with suggestions to declare one's home a "Fat Talk Free Zone" or to limit girls to two minutes of "grumbling and groaning" about imperfections. The author concludes with a helpful guide to resources promoting a healthy body image and self esteem, and a list of shops that carry plus-sized clothing. (Oct.) (c)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

ROBYN J.A. SILVERMAN, PhD, is a leading expert in body and self-esteem development who appears regularly on national television and radio, including The Tyra Banks Show, Fox & Friends, Nightline and NPR. An award-winning columnist and writer, she lives in New Jersey with her husband and children. Visit her website at www.DrRobynSilverman.com.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Harlequin; Original edition (September 21, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0373892209
  • ISBN-13: 978-0373892204
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.8 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #215,913 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By J. Vanleer on November 17, 2010
Format: Paperback
As a writer for Plugged In Parents website, I can say with complete honesty that this book is a MUST read for all women (of any age). Before I start my review, I need to be upfront with you. This book really hit home, and I cried several times while reading it, because I've been struggling with an eating disorder for the past five years.

While pregnant with my first son, I gained 50 pounds. I ate and ate and ate, having no idea the weight wouldn't magically come off after I had my son. Now, I'm not a petite person at all. I'm 5'8" and I've always been a size medium. There was no reason for me to gain 50 pounds. So when my son was 8 months old and I was struggling to lose the last 10 pounds, I started something I never thought I would do. After overeating, I would make myself purge (throw up).

Just typing that brings me to tears. Feeling completely out of control of your own body is an awful place to be.

The thing is, I looked great. I had a bit of a baby belly, but good grief, I had just given birth 8 months before! I was just too self-conscious that I freaked out. I needed to see that pre-baby weight number on the scale.

Fast forward a few years and I have yet to see that number on the scale. I still struggle with overeating and, every once in awhile, purging. I'm ashamed of this, and I'm working on getting past it. I'm trying to see myself as a beautiful woman, no matter what size I am. I know we're not all made the same, and I will never be a size 2, nor do I want to be. I want to find the beauty in ME, not base my beauty on a number or a size.

Why is there so much pressure for girls to look a certain way in our society today?
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Format: Paperback
I think the title of Dr. Robyn Silverman's book (Good Girls Don't Get Fat) really says it all. We've trained our girls to think they are bad or less of a person if they are fat. Whether it's through magazines, television, the internet or ironically, the people who are supposed to love these girls the most (parents, siblings, "friends," and teachers - yes teachers!!), girls are beginning to worry about their weight at younger and younger ages. While talk radio programs air news stories weekly extolling the dangers of obesity (which is, of course, also an important health issue), Dr. Silverman sees countless girls in her practice with only minor weight problems or none at all. However, these girls have convinced themselves they are fat and therefore "bad."

The book provides excellent information of how aspects of a young girl's life can send her the message of to be thin is to be happy, healthy, loved. The author takes the discussion from the "inside out" starting with what a girl thinks about her weight in her own head and continuing to cover how the various relationships in her life can exacerbate the issues. Including how powerful words can be in these various relationships (mother, father, step-parents if applicable, other family members, teachers and other adults).

Dr. Silverman uses a lot of tools, tips and worksheets throughout the book and are an excellent supplement to the information. Readers get examples of weight issues that may arise with girls and can read "Say What" boxes to give guidance on "what not to say" and "what to say" -- (dads take note of that please). "Overheard" boxes appear throughout the chapters as well which share stories and quotes from girls she interviewed.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you look in the mirror and hear negative voices, this book is for you. If you look at your kids and all you notice is their physical state, this book is for you. If you are a husband, wife, father, mother, sister, brother, aunt, uncle or TEACHER, this book is for you.

GGDGF challenges our society's obsession with appearance to look at the impacts on, primarily, teenage girls, both past and present, in the form of eating disorders, low self esteem and as the targets of constant unpardonable marketing. Some of the voices you will hear in this book are heartbreaking, but they are voices that need to be heard
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In pursuit of advice I read Good Girls don't Get Fat by Dr. Robyn Silverman. I have followed her a while on Twitter and Facebook and really like what I learn from her. She is also an adoptive mom of two small kiddos. The book is an excellent read for parents of girls and teachers. It reviews everyday parenting at the dinner table and touches on the subject of bullying in the classroom.

The book is packed with studies, examples and great advice. Just a few things I took away from the book that make me glad I read it:

1) When moms say things,girls remember. Even a poorly worded complement (you look like you lost weight) can effect how a girl feels about weight. We are all going to say things wrong sometimes without meaning to, but I think I need to pay attention to every word I say about weight and health. I need to make sure that I regularly give praise to the girls about how lovely they are to off-balance the stupid things that sometimes come out.

2) Listen to what the girls are saying and answer with what they need. Saying "don't be silly everyone looks different" to a girl when she says "My body looks funny" is not helpful. We need to say. Your body is amazing. Your healthy and active and your body will take you to amazing places!

3)What dad's say and do matter. The cute nick-names of the toddler days like chubby cheeks should be put to rest. Girls are watching and listening to what dad says. So dads should watch what they say just as much as moms. If your daughter hears negative comments about plus-size women she is going to process it and possibly take it to heart if she feels she is plus-size as well.

4. Learn how your girls think and what motivates them. Trash talking does not work as a motivator for most girls.
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