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Good in Bed Audible – Unabridged

4.0 out of 5 stars 1,087 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audible Audio Edition
  • Listening Length: 13 hours and 59 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio
  • Audible.com Release Date: March 20, 2012
  • Whispersync for Voice: Ready
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007MWWYAS
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Like others who hated this book, I really wanted to enjoy it. Like the main character, I'm a fat word-lover, often too smart and sarcastic for my own good, who considered the Pink Rose Bakery in Philadelphia a second home. Unfortunately, I spent most of my time screaming at this book, and when I was finally finished I threw it against my wall. On the one hand, I admire the author for presenting a full-figured, flawed character. However, Cannie, the heroine, remains self-centered, self-pitying, immature, judgmental, condesceding, elitist, and cruel throughout the whole book, and is repeatedly indulged by friends, loved ones, and worst of all the author, Jennifer Weiner. Weiner allows Cannie to dance through life without having to take responsibility for herself, and the "redemption" she experiences rings false. Worse, the book is littered with cliches, including, most offensively, a lesbian with two cats named Gertrude and Alice, who is reviled by Cannie and her siblings even though it may be the closest her mother has come to a partner in her life. I pity the lesbian reader who reads this book and encounters such a one-dimensional, snide rendering of a stereotype.
A thing that aggravates me about reviews of this book is that many claim it's better than Bridget Jones because the character is heavier, a "real fat woman." I found Bridget a lot more likeable, regardless of her weight, because you got to see her standing by her friends. Cannie seems to have friends who treat her a lot better than she treats them, or herself. While I'm sure that the author saw Cannie as very kind, the glimpses of a loving Cannie are few and far between her monologues of self-loathing.
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Format: Hardcover
I must confess that I was predisposed to like "Good in Bed," since I've been a big fan of Jennifer Weiner's newspaper columns for some time. I wasn't, however, prepared for how fine a first novel she has produced, or how moved I was by Cannie's story. The book begins with a hilarious hook: protagonist Cannie Shapiro, entertainment columnist for a large Philadelphia newspaper, realizes that her recently-ex-boyfriend has been hired by a Cosmo-like magazine to write a [adult] column. To her horror, Cannie realizes that the pseudo-anonymous woman "C." in Bruce's first article is her. To make this invasion of privacy even more humiliating, the column is an unexpectedly perceptive treatment of Cannie's weight problem and its effect on their relationship. At first glance, one might assume the snarky tone of the first few pages would continue as the novel spun out in a kind of lightweight revenge fantasy. But Weiner uses Cannie's heartbreaking invasion of privacy as jumping off point for so much more. We see Cannie grow and change, exorcising childhood demons (mostly), getting over Bruce (at last), and most moving of all, finally coming to terms with her place in life (and yes, her weight, too). If the plot is moved along by a few too many incredible coincidences, if the book seems almost too jam-packed with characters and subplots, well, these are minor criticisms of a finely-written and sensitive first novel. Just promise me, Jennifer, you won't let Camryn Manheim star in the movie version.......
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Format: Paperback
This book started out good but quickly went downhill. The main character Cannie spends much of the book whining about how hard her life is because she is overweight. She tells you she hates skinny people and delights in trying to make them look foolish. Bruce Cannie's ex-boyfriend writes an insightful article about their relationship and her problems with her self image because of her weight, but Cannie is incensed because he calls her fat and overweight in a national magazine and misses most of what he is trying to convey in the article. We are also supposed to empathize with her because Bruce called her fat even though she describes herself as fat and overweight throughout the book. Besides since Bruce doesn't want Cannie we are supposed to believe he is a jerk ... . I couldn't understand why Bruce or any of Cannie's friends put up with her or wasted any time on someone who was so insecure, obnoxious and needy.
Oh wait, as the author keeps telling us she's "funny" and fun to be around, although bitter would be a more accurate description of many of Cannie's not so funny one-liners. Cannie goes from being a promising character to a boring, self-involved, narcissistic, grating, selfish jerk. The author has the main character making so many one-liners it was hard to empathize with or get any real feeling of the character. When she was describing her relationship with her father all I could think was "okay, whatever." We are supposed to feel sorry for her because her father "forced" her to go to Princeton, and made her pay for some of her tuition. Cry me a river! She does a poor me story about her time at Princeton even though she got to write for the school paper and accomplished her goals.
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Format: Hardcover
The premise of this novel is excellent: after all the 'thin is best' propaganda, including that propagated by Jane Green's 'Jemima J', it's great to see a book which not only criticises the anti-fat culture in our world today, but argues that it's not necessary to be thin in order to be loved.
Cannie is in her twenties, an averagely-successful journalist on a city paper, just taking a breathing-space from a three-year relationship with Bruce... and is fat. Which, she claims, does not bother her, though we, the readers, suspect that this isn't the case. Then the bombshell strikes: Bruce has just got a column with a popular national women's magazine, and his first column is entitled 'Loving a Larger Woman'. And guess what? It's about him and Cannie, to whom he refers as his ex.
Cannie has never thought of herself as a larger woman until this point. And the article is crueller still: it begins 'I will never forget the day I discovered that my girlfriend weighs more than me.' And finishes: 'Loving a larger woman is an act of courage in the modern world'.
Naturally, she is humiliated, and the relationship is now completely over. Too late, she reads the full article, only to discover that it wasn't cruel after all, that Bruce understood her insecurities and hang-ups only too well all along, and that he loved her regardless of them. Her weight was an issue with her, not with him, and his reference to loving her being an act of courage meant that she, not him, made it difficult for them to be together because she could never quite convince herself that he loved her.
This is an extraordinary article, written with sensitivity and feeling. So here's my first problem with the book: we're supposed to believe that Bruce is an insensitive, uncaring loser. Huh? The guy who wrote that article?
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