Qty:1
& FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
In stock on August 5, 2016.
Order it now.
Sold by skyvo-direct-usa and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
The Great Raid (Director'... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: ITEM IS LIKE NEW!!! NO EXCUSES 100% SATISFACTION GUARANTEE!!! ALL PURCHASES 100% GUARANTEED!!! BUY HERE WITH CONFIDENCE!!!
Trade in your item
Get up to a $0.69
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

The Great Raid (Director's Cut) [Blu-ray]

4.4 out of 5 stars 476 customer reviews

Additional Blu-ray options Edition Discs
Price
New from Used from
Blu-ray
(Sep 19, 2006)
"Please retry"
Director's Cut
1
$24.08
$4.45 $1.13
Blu-ray
"Please retry"
1
$6.87 $12.51
Watch Instantly with Rent Buy

There is a newer version of this item:


Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream thousands of movies & TV shows included with Prime. Start your free trial
$24.08 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details In stock on August 5, 2016. Order it now. Sold by skyvo-direct-usa and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Great Raid (Director's Cut) [Blu-ray]
  • +
  • Enemy At The Gates [Blu-ray]
  • +
  • Defiance [Blu-ray]
Total price: $40.76
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Miramax The Great Raid (Blu-Ray) In the epic traditionof "Saving Private Ryan," "The Great Raid" is an inspirational true story of the most triumphant rescue mission in U.S. military history! As World War II rages, the elite 6th Ranger Battalion is given a mission of heroic proportions: push 30 miles behind enemy lines and liberate over 500 American prisoners of war. Under the command of Lt. Col. Henry Mucci (Benjamin Bratt - "Traffic"), the men of the 6th will face the unthinkable by attempting the impossible! Also featuring James Franco ("Spider-Man 1 & 2"), Connie Nielsen ("Gladiator"), and Joseph Fiennes ("Shakespeare In Love"), this gripping big-screen hit captures a moment in time when men of honor became soldiers of destiny!

Amazon.com

Nearly three years after it was filmed, The Great Raid finally appeared as a welcome reminder that good old-fashioned World War II movies never go out of style. While lacking the scale, prestige, and pulse-pounding momentum of Saving Private Ryan, this fact-based war drama benefits from a back-to-basics approach to realism and a rousing rescue climax that more than compensates for the slower passages that precede it. Adapted from the books The Great Raid on Cabanatuan and Ghost Soldiers, it chronicles the five-day mission (in late January 1945) to rescue 511 American prisoners of war held by the Japanese at Cabanatuan POW camp in the Philippines. Under the direction of neo-noir specialist John Dahl (The Last Seduction), the film's three-part structure follows the raid mission led by Lt. Col. Mucci (Benjamin Bratt); the plight of the POWs at Cabanatuan, including malaria-stricken Maj. Gibson (Joseph Fiennes); and civilian resistance in Manila as carried out by real-life hero and Gibson's (fictional) would-be lover Margaret Utinsky (Connie Nielsen), whose effort to aid the POWs is vigilantly monitored by the enemy Japanese. In keeping with war-movie traditions, Dahl handles character and action with no-nonsense intelligence, favoring a slow build over pumped-up adrenalin. By the time the miraculous rescue is executed with critical assistance by Filpino guerillas, The Great Raid has earned its stripes, honoring the brave men who carried out the most successful rescue mission in U.S. military history. --Jeff Shannon

Special Features

  • Movie Showcase (film highlights feature)
  • Bonus Spec (Unless Otherwise Noted):
  • - AVC Video @ 15.5 mbps
  • - English 5.1 Audio @ 448kbps
  • - English SDH Subtitles

Product Details

  • Actors: Benjamin Bratt, Joseph Fiennes, James Franco, Robert Mammone, Max Martini
  • Directors: John Dahl
  • Writers: Carlo Bernard, Doug Miro, Hampton Sides, William B. Breuer
  • Producers: Bob Weinstein, Harvey Weinstein, Jonathan Gordon
  • Format: Blu-ray, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.40:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    Unrated
    Not Rated
  • Studio: Miramax Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: September 19, 2006
  • Run Time: 132 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (476 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000H7J9P8
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #106,987 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Great Raid (Director's Cut) [Blu-ray]" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Following in the tradition of such great World War II films as "Saving Private Ryan" and "Patton", "The Great Raid" tells the true story of an American rescue mission that took place over five days in January, 1945. Cabanatuan prison was located some thirty miles behind Japanese lines. Inside its walls were over 500 American prisoners. Many were survivors of the Bataan death march. These men had been improsoned for over three years. Many began to feel that their country had left them behind.

By late 1944, the Americans had returned to the Philippines. After learning about the existance of Cabanatuan, the Americans devised a plan to send an elite group of Army Rangers in to resue the POWs. Lt. Col. Henry Mucci (Benjamin Bratt), commander of the 6th Ranger Batallion, was given the assignment of developing the mission. Captain Robert Prince (James Franco) was placed in charge of planning and actually carrying out the raid. The Rangers would have to travel thirty miles into enemy-held territory, much of the time in broad daylight with very little cover. Fortunately, they received a great deal of help from the Filipino resistance.

Once at the camp, the Rangers burst through the front gate, suppressing the Japanese with heavy rifle fire, knocking out strongpoints and vehicles, and going through each building until every prisoner was accounted for. Many could not walk on their own, so the Rangers carried them to saftey. Once safely outside of the camp, Filipios using carabou carts helped transport the prisoners to American lines and freedom. In the end, 511 prisoners were rescued at the cost of only two Rangers who were killed in action. Major Daniel Gibson (Joseph Fiennes) was the ranking American officer in the camp.
Read more ›
1 Comment 113 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
The Great Raid is one of the best war movies I've seen in several years, and it makes me downright mad to learn of this film's long-neglected, still overlooked history. It was filmed in 2002, then delayed for three full years thanks to a bunch of bureaucratic jabberwocky. When it finally saw the light of day in 2005, I didn't hear the first thing about it, which says a lot about the marketing behind it. Then, a number of professional critics cast aspersions upon it - all the usual suspects who prefer their own make-believe world where the worst sadists are merely misunderstood victims of a bad childhood and real history is just something to be distorted in pursuit of your own political agenda. The Great Raid is just far too true for these elitists, and - even worse - it shows that war, as horrible as it is, is sometimes a necessity in the face of outright evil. These guys can blanch and puff up all they like, but anyone who knows anything about World War II knows that the Japanese were some of the most merciless, brutal, downright sadistic soldiers the world has ever seen. That very concept is incorporated into this movie because it's true. The Great Raid adds a few unnecessary romantic elements to the story, but that story itself is an honorably realistic presentation of the most audacious, successful rescue mission in American military history. It's a story every American should know - but more than likely doesn't.

There was a good reason why General MacArthur vowed to return after FDR ordered him to withdraw from the Philippines - he was leaving a lot of good men behind, brave soldiers who suffered and died horribly after their Commander in Chief abandoned them.
Read more ›
3 Comments 126 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
The Great Raid is a fantastic World War II film. The fast paced action is based on the real life rescue of the American POWs at Capanatuan in the Philippines. Director John Dahl pulls no punches. He correctly depicts the allied forces as the good guys and the Japanese as generally nothing less than war criminals. This is indeed historically accurate and Dahl refuses to shy away from the truth merely to satisfy the politically correct leftist crowd. Lt. Colonel Mucci (Benjamin Bratt) and Captain Prince (James Franco) were ordered to devise a plan that could quickly free as many of the sickly and malnourished prisoners like Major Gibson (Joseph Fiennes) as possible. Time is short. The war is almost over and Emperor Hirohito's followers of Bushido prefer death to surrender. If they are going to die, so too will the POWs. The pitiless Japanese particularly enjoy burning prisoners alive. They were, during that time period, racists to the core and perceived non-Japanese as inferior and unworthy of humane consideration.

Lt. Colonel Mucci partners with the fearless Philippine guerillas. They in turn rely on Margaret Utinsky (Connie Nielsen) and other members of the resistance to supply them with support and intelligence. The violence is brutal and not for the squeamish. There will be moments when you might even be inclined to turn your eyes away from the screen. Are the Japanese today as evil as their predecessors of some sixty years ago? Of course not, and we must not forget that all races, ethnic groups, and nationalities are comprised of moral and immoral individuals. There are few remaining WWII veterans. They fought to save our freedoms and constitutional rights. The least we can do, is to make an effort to more fully understand their struggles and heroism. The Great Raid is one of the best pictures of this year. Anyone who is a teenager or older should see it.
6 Comments 186 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Forums



What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customers Also Watched on Amazon Video