Buy New
$15.09
& FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by S&J Deals and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Greystoke: Legend of Tarz... has been added to your Cart
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$14.95
+ $3.99 shipping
Sold by: Captain Ziggy
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Greystoke: Legend of Tarzan Lord of Apes [VHS]

4.4 out of 5 stars 364 customer reviews

Watch Instantly with Rent Buy

Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream thousands of movies & TV shows included with Prime. Start your free trial
$15.09 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by S&J Deals and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


Product Details

  • Actors: Ralph Richardson, Ian Holm, James Fox, Christopher Lambert, Andie MacDowell
  • Directors: Hugh Hudson
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, Special Edition, NTSC
  • Rated:
    PG
    Parental Guidance Suggested
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • VHS Release Date: July 14, 1994
  • Run Time: 136 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (364 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6303072763
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #450,615 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Wayne Klein HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 31, 2004
Format: DVD
Although it doesn't quite live up to Robert Towne's original script, "Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan Lord of The Apes" manages to bring much of the spectacle of Edgar Rice Burroughs' original tale with a distinctive, powerful edge missing from every other version of the novel. Towne's script and the film adhere to most of the narrative about Tarzan growing up while drifting away from some of the more extreme fantasy elements present in the original novel.

When the child of a female gorilla is mercilessly beaten to death, his mother adopts an infant human whose parents were killed by the same gorilla. The couple were shipwrecked and thought dead by the man's grandfather the Earl of Greystoke. The infant continues to have conflicts with the lead gorilla of the group as he grows up and is, in fact, beaten up and left for dead at one point. As he grows into manhood, he discovers the home of his parents, his mother's locket, and his father's knife and sees his reflection for the first time. He's horrified and fascinated at the same time realizing that, while he doesn't quite look like his mother, she is still his mother. Gradually, he discovers children's blocks that show him what a human looks like for the first time.

When his mother is murdered by tribesmen hunting the gorillas for food, he fights back for the first time killing one of the tribesmen breaking the man's back. He also stands up to and kills the gorilla that tried to kill him and succeeded in killing his parents long ago.
Read more ›
Comment 90 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
This film was an attempt to do justice to teh original idea of Tarzan that ERB had intended. There was just too much in the orignal story that could not be done in a single film, but I think this version has been the best attempt to date.

And the comment in the official Amazon review that having a French accented actor play Tarzan was a "mistake" shows that the reviewer never read the orignal book. The first human SPOKEN language that Tarzan learned was French which he learned from a French officer whom he had rescued. The Ian Holm character was in the original book. He was not an "add on." So not only was the casting of Christopher Lambert appropriate; it was true to ERB's orignal story line.
Comment 38 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Blu-ray
A fascinating curiosity but something of a troubled and uneven picture, "Greystoke" was originally the brainchild of "Chinatown" writer Robert Towne. After languishing in pre-production hell for years, Warner Bros. finally decided to rework Towne's script - which he had originally wanted to direct himself -- as a vehicle for director Hugh Hudson, then a red hot commodity after the Oscar-winning "Chariots of Fire."

The resulting film, which Towne removed his name from (in favor of the pseudonym "P.H. Vazak" - Towne's dog!), reportedly retained the structure of Towne's script in its first half - showing the upbringing of young Lord Greystoke (Christopher Lambert) in the wilds of Africa by a society of apes and his eventual discovery by a group of adventurers led by Ian Holm. However, Hudson deviated from both the script, as well as Edgar Rice Borroughs' source material, in its tedious second half, when Tarzan returns to the family manor in Scotland and meets dear old grandpa (Ralph Richardson). Suddenly the film shifts gears from a gorgeous, albeit serious adaptation of Tarzan in the wild to a drawing room drama a la Merchant-Ivory, compounded by leaden scenes (Richardson's Earl of Greystoke sliding down a flight of stairs on a dining service tray) and the decision to have Glenn Close dub the movie's Jane - Andie McDowell (a film debut she's spent her career living down). The latter eliminates any chance of Lambert and McDowell generating any chemistry together, so the love story comes across as limp while the dramatic development of Greystoke (he's never called Tarzan at any point in the film) and his failure to acclimate to civilization seems misplaced compared to the upbeat, exciting thrills of Borroughs' original stories.
Read more ›
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: VHS Tape
There have been many film adaptations of Edgar Rice Burrough's tales of Tarzan. Most of them were produced in the earlier days of movie making, and were filmed on back lots in Hollywood. While a number of them provided good entertainment, few of them really depicted Burrough's book, "Tarzan, Lord of the Apes." "Greystoke" is, however, different in that respect.
While there are certainly disparities between Burrough's book and this movie, "Greystoke" is the most faithful in storyline, character development, and essence of any Tarzan movie I have seen. Christopher Lambert does a great job as Tarzan. And Andie MacDowell makes an enticing Jane.
I wonder how the movie would have played though if the director/producer had decided to use Andie MacDowell's own voice instead of opting to have Glenn Close do voice overs for all of Andie's lines? Perhaps they thought that Andie's slight southern accent would detract from the atmosphere they were trying to develop?
Anyway, the visual impact of the movie is great. The scenery is awesome. The sound track is supporting and blends into the overall sensory effect that helps drive the movie forward. One down side has to be the costuming for the apes. While the costumes were adequate, they were inferior to other top-notch visual effects of the movie. To be fair to the special effects folks, there were few other options in 1983 that would allow a more realistic representation of animals like great apes and the kinds of ape-human interactions needed to make the film work.
Read more ›
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Forums


S&J Deals Privacy Statement S&J Deals Shipping Information S&J Deals Returns & Exchanges