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Condition: Used: Good
Comment: BINDING IS TIGHT. PAGES ARE CLEAN AND UNMARKED EXCEPT FOR OCCASIONAL MARGIN NOTES. COVER SHOWS SOME WEAR, MOSTLY AT EDGES AND CORNERS.
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Guess What Came to Dinner?: Parasites and Your Health Paperback – July 9, 2001

4.5 out of 5 stars 53 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A nutrition director for the American Academy of Nutrition and the author of the bestseller Beyond Pritikin , Gittleman has exhaustively studied the parasite world, particularly its relation to human health and nutrition. Although she tackles the subject of parasitic illnesses and their diagnosis, treatment and prevention with knowledge and a credible background, her book offers in ten chapters what could have been done in a single long but concise one. In a hit-and-run style, the author touches on a specific subject, be it day care centers, household pets, or travel, only to drop it and repeat the information in another section of the book. This repetition, combined with constant footnotes, disrupts and clutters a reading of the book. Readers without some background in clinical parasitology may also have a hard time staying with Gittleman through the technical section that serves as a reference guide to the individual parasites. The chapter on prevention provides the most accessible information. There, the author gives clear and usable instructions on avoiding parasite-induced illnesses via good personal hygiene, proper infant and child care, sensible sexual practices, sanitary animal care, careful travel practices and safe water usage and food handling. The book wraps up with an easy-to-understand glossary, although it lacks necessary pronunciation symbols, and a thorough, but meant-for-health-professionals, appendix on drug treatment of parasitic infections.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Ann Louise Gittleman, M.S., CNS, received her master’s degree in nutrition education from Columbia University Teachers College. A lecturer internationally on dietary, environmental, and women’s health matters, Gittleman is the author of thirty books, including Super Nutrition for Women, Super Nutrition for Menopause, and Super Nutrition for Men. She lives in Montana.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Avery; 2 edition (July 9, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1583330968
  • ISBN-13: 978-1583330968
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #56,728 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 11, 2005
Format: Paperback
Ann Louise Gittleman is doing all she can to raise awareness of the danger of parasites in our lives; it is, she argues, a silent epidemic. We've all heard of outbreaks of E. coli and the like, but such disturbing stories quickly fade away from the public consciousness. Most people don't want to think about all the really nasty things that might be oozing their way throughout their bodies. Gittleman clearly makes the case, however, that parasites are a growing danger, and the fact that many medical professionals aren't especially knowledgeable about the subject only exacerbates the problem. Few medical students take a single course on parasitology, she says, because such courses are usually found under tropical diseases - and we in the United States still tend to think that parasites only affect the lives of those in impoverished and/or tropical nations. Gittleman's objective in writing this book (now available in this revised version) is to educate everyone, layman and medical professional alike, on the extent of the parasite threat. By doing so, she is able to offer advice and guidance on protecting yourself from the myriad of invisible threats parasites pose.

First, Gittleman lays out a strong case for the greatly increased prevalence of parasites in today's America, pointing to a number of factors such as the great increase in international travel, the contamination of water supplies, the increased use of antibiotics, the ever-growing use of day-care centers (which one expert dubbed the open sewers of the 20th century), and the dramatic number of household pets interacting with men, women, and especially children. She then describes some of the symptoms of the different kinds of parasitic conditions.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
All I can say is God Bless Ann Louise Gittleman. If it were not for this book that I brought with me into my physician's office, I would have never discovered that I had a chronic case of giardia. My doctor was dismissing my symptoms for the longest time and finally when I found Ann Louise's books, I realized that a parasitic infection can be misdiagnosed as flu, IBS, or even gall bladder disease. Now that I have taken the prescribed medication and am using Ann Louise's suggested natural herbs from Uni Key as a follow up, I am a new person. This book should be Mandatory reading for every high school student, college student and health minded individual in America.
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This topic, affecting so many millions without their knowledge, and without treatment, certainly has to be one of the few unexplored areas in the public media. Most public media will not "touch" this news. The effects on health are myriad. Gittleman has acknowledged the problem with parasites, both large and gross, and small and microbial. Everytime one comes in from outdoors, digging in the soil, cleaning up after pets, pulling weeds, etc., one must wash doubly, and clean under and around fingernails. The thought of pets kept indoors, being let outside, then going back in and climbing on the furniture, the beds, walking on the countertops, eating from human family dishes, etc., makes my skin "crawl". We are living in a parasitic nightmare, similar to the most abject, filthy slums, here in our arrogant, smug, current style. The image of classy, high-toned people being kissed and licked by their pets, immediately after the pet just licked and kissed its street friends is amusing, isn't it? What do we see in nearly every prime-time TV ad? A pet, licking a child, or "kissing" an adult. Everytime one pets pets of any kind, or grooms them, or cleans up after them, it is safest to assume parasites are there, ready to infect the human. Organic food of every kind may be full of nematodes and other parasites, especially if it has been fertilized with barnyard manure of any age, composted or not. Wash your food, or soak it in mild detergent in water, or even put it in water with a single drop of chlorine, then rinse very thoroughly. Did you know that many herbal treatments for cancer are the same ones used to treat parasitic infection? And you all want to cut down those precious and useful black walnut trees?Read more ›
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I thought Ann Louise Gittleman did a wonderfully thorough job of exposing parasites in terms of where they come from, who gets them, and what we can do about it to prevent them. Her dietary information was right on in light of the current concerns about sugar and processed foods plus the herbal and homeopathic remedies really work. I think the overly sensitive reviewer from San Franciso should get with the program - This book tells it like it is and specifically states that parasites know no boundary regardless of gender, race, or economic level.
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The pros: The author makes it clear that parasites are a much bigger problem than many Americans think and that alone is a very important assertion. She also does a decent job of laying out the most common symptoms of various parasites, which most doctors are clueless about.

The cons: The author's recommendations for ridding the body of parasites are incomplete and, at times, inaccurate. The drugs she recommends in many cases are not actually the drugs that are most effective in treating specific parasites. For example, she lists Chloroquine as a top pharmaceutical remedy for both liver flukes and lung flukes, but that drug is extremely toxic and not all that effective. It is most commonly used to prevent malaria. The drugs more commonly used (and in talking with others who have treated/rid themselves of these parasites, more effective) are Triclabendazole, Egaten, Fasinex, Bithionol, Lorothidol and Bitin. True, some of these drugs (Egaten especially) are not available in the U.S., but then again, every expert I've read (including Gittleman) all say the sources of flukes are not in the U.S. either, so it makes sense that in countries where parasite treatment is more common (and more needed) certain treatments would be more likely to be available there. There are ways to get some of the drugs that aren't usually available in the U.S., but that's not the point here -- the point is that when I read research reports on studies conducted on eliminating various parasites, they don't match up with the recommendations given in this book. Nor does the experience of the group of people I've talked to from various places regarding elimination of parasites.
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