Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

HTML & CSS: The Good Parts (Animal Guide) 1st Edition

3.3 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0596157609
ISBN-10: 0596157606
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$9.48 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$24.73 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
28 New from $2.77 34 Used from $0.42
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for the Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$24.73 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • HTML & CSS: The Good Parts (Animal Guide)
  • +
  • JavaScript: The Good Parts
Total price: $45.54
Buy the selected items together

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ben Henick has been building Web sites since September 1995, when he took on his first Web project as an academic volunteer. He has worked in nearly every aspect of site design and development, from foundation HTML through finicky CSS to larger scale architecture and content management. He has written for A List Apart, the Web Standards Project, and most recently for Opera Software's Web Standards Curriculum.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Series: Animal Guide
  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (February 28, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596157606
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596157609
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.7 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,419,075 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm a professional developer, and have only recently begun writing front-end websites (mostly as a hobby) over the past year or so.

I picked up this book because I was looking for a detailed guide to HTML and CSS which covered best-practices, code minimization, and provided some real world examples of what to do, and what not to do when writing large website frontends.

In short, this book did NOT live up to my expectations in the least.

First off, this book is just shy of 300 pages of content, which could easily be summed up in ~10 pages. The author is EXTREMELY verbose, and seems to drag on and on with every little insignificant detail in the text.

Secondly, this book contains almost no code samples at all. There are very few code snippets throughout the book, and the ones that are provided are small, not rendered with any pictures near them (which is unforgivable, as they are supposed to show how certain CSS attributes can display data), and extremely simple. If the author would have added images / diagrams to at least show how the CSS snippets effect the design of the page, I would be slightly more understanding here.

Thirdly, this book doesn't really discuss the 'good parts' of HTML and CSS. Sure, it has chapters labeled Good Parts, Bad Parts, and Awful Parts, but it doesn't actually draw any meaningful distinctions between what is good, what is bad, and WHY.

Over all, this book is not worth the money. It:

1. Seems quickly thrown together.
2. Is far too verbose.
3. Does not have enough code samples / diagrams.
4. Has almost no real content.
5. Doesn't explain anything about the 'good', 'bad', and 'awful' parts of HTML or CSS.

I honestly can't recommend this book to anyone, as it is not geared towards beginners, intermediate developers, or advanced users.
Comment 31 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I bought this book at the same time as Javascript: The Good Parts, hoping that it would teach me the most useful parts of CSS and HTML without being too verbose. That is exactly what the Javascript book did, but this one proved almost useless in that respect. Rather than present the important parts of CSS and HTML in a logical and comprehensible fashion, this book instead gives a lot of wordy advice apparently intended for people who already know HTML and CSS. Reading some of the glowing reviews on Amazon leads me to think that perhaps it's not worthless, but just misnamed. Perhaps a better name would have been "Essays on HTML and CSS Style." I'm not qualified to write a review of that hypothetical book. But if you are hoping to learn CSS and HTML, I don't recommend buying this.
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I haven't read the entire book, but I think I can still offer a helpful review.

I bought this book because I thoroughly enjoyed JavaScript: The Good Parts. I expected a short book that explained the important parts of HTML and CSS in a clear and concise fashion. However, I'm having a hard time getting through the chapter on CSS layout. Not enough explanation in some places, paragraphs that are hard to follow. Is it too concise? I think it was written for somebody who already knew CSS layout. Here's an example:

"An element with a float value of left or right must: ... Be contiguous with the element boxes of affected non-floated elements that it precedes in the source order, but not the contents of those elements. This behavior is quite relevant when composing multicolumn layouts."

I was left with many questions in my head after that.

There were many paragraphs in the book which made my eyes glaze over. I'm through struggling with this book.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I am a graphic designer who gets off on both right and left brain activities. I like working on code. I am not a developer, but I do enjoy knowing how things work.

With that said, I have been struggling for the past few years to say with confidence that I am a web designer. At age 31, I was starting to feel obsolete because I just couldn't wrap my brain around HTML and CSS enough to feel that I really owned it. I could edit bits and pieces of things. I could grasp some general concepts. But all in all, I was lost. I could play checkers with code, but I could not build things.

I was at that point when this book came to me.

This book contained the context (the why, and the how) behind the disparate jibbly-bits floating in my head behind a website.

This is not a book that will walk you through a bunch of step-by-step tutorials. Those tutorials don't help me anyway. Design and development are not linear processes.

What was helpful (for me) was feeling like I had an expert with a willingness to speak above my head *just a little bit* and pull me along into a foreign language. It's not an easy read, but it was something I could curl up with on a couch with some coffee and dive into. Did it hurt my brain? Yes. But in that sense that I was really learning something. And that feels good.

I highly recommend this book for others like me who are transitioning from being a print designer to being a web designer who knows how web sites work.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book gives strategic advice for how to use HTML and CSS. It's not a comprehensive introduction to HTML and CSS; that would take a much larger book. It reminds me of the Effective C++ books by Scott Meyers: advice on how to make good use of the language, not a syntax tutorial. It sometimes explains what to do but not how to do it. In those cases, the book gives links to a companion web site with more details. If you have some experience with HTML and CSS, but feel like you're not using the tools as well as you'd like, this would be a good book to pick up.

I appreciate that the author endorses the spirit of web standards without being a language lawyer. Sometimes you have to make compromises.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

HTML & CSS: The Good Parts (Animal Guide)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: HTML & CSS: The Good Parts (Animal Guide)