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Showing 11-20 of 36 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 58 reviews
on January 21, 2012
This book is truly a unique piece, it is bringing together the stories of the most transformational leaders in our human history, with our current human situation; and what is meaningful life-work; success and failure both are formative factors to every man and woman, and have formed the situation we are all personally in. Andreas Kluth studies Hannibal's story well and delivers it to us in a correlation to figures of our contemporary history. For example, Einstein, Tiger Woods, Eleanor Roosevelt, Morihei Ueshiba all make an appearance and add to our understanding of the theme.

Often Andreas reminds me of the fantastic Professor Rufus Fears of the U. of Oklahoma, giving us the 'scoop' on what truly made humanity change through the eons. (It's really very entertaining!)

Certainly I expect future comparisons might be made to Tony Hsieh's book 'Delivering Happiness', which I also enjoyed, but I will recommend that this book takes into account a grand human history that we will enjoy recounting. Kluth is not only a wonderful writer, this book is a page-turner that goes beyond genre and is quite applicable, highly recommended.
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on March 29, 2014
If you have read Sun Tzu and want develop more different strategy this may be your next book, I have read many books for strategies and tatics, this not only evaluate war but different personalities in many situations of life as; objective or opportunist, emotions created by Cleopatra at young age to control leaders , creating black spot and win Hannibal, center of gravity and using the force of the opponent Akido fight ,Fabius do nothing may win , Picasso and Cezane , inverse attics of Tiger Woods, and others, very good.
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on February 4, 2012
One of the best books I have read in a while. Not didactic in tone, yet instructing and informing through fascinating stories and intimate nuances of human life and lives. This is not, and there will never be, a manual to dealing with life as it comes at you, but this may be the compass you need as you find a time to reflect on where you have come from and where you might be headed.

There are three layers in this page turner - that informs, inquires and indicates at the same time. The first layer - the fascinating long shot story of a great general, and his life and times. The second layer - a more contemporary view of presidents, scientists and musicians in the modern world. In times of cultural revolutions and building nations. And finally - a third and personal life story of the author who interweaves his growth as a human being, with scientific precision, with the two first layers.
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on September 10, 2013
The book is nice, very personal and has a wide scope, but it doesn't do justice to the man. To see Hannibal out of a perspective of victory and defeat or success and failure is very common, because we usually adopt the view of the victors. Let's go beyond this. Ever pondered the passages where Hannibal talks about impermanence? About uncertainty, fear of death and courage? About peace? About his political scopes after the conclusion of a treaty with the Romans? What a pity that the writings of Silenos and Sosylos are lost.
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on May 9, 2015
I laughed often as I read this book as I saw myself and friends as the characters. It's a good leveller for anyone who has had success.....or perceived failure. I will definitely read it again.
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on January 10, 2012
Hannibal and Me is a journey through the triumphs and failures of not just military strategists, but great men and women in arts, literature, sports, politics, psychology and science. It is an experience that every person will relate to simply by the fact that we all succeed and fail at times in our lives.
Mr. Kluth's ability to take us from the ancient lands of Carthage and Rome to the modern tactical discipline of Tiger Woods creates a fantastic voyage through time and into the lives of many remarkable historical and modern personalities. His stories flow effortlessly bringing us into Cleopatra's mind as an ambitious seductress and Einstein's self-imposed imprisonment. His words are entertaining while educating and transforming one's outlook.
Most compelling is Mr. Kluth's skill in reforming our understanding of success and failure. By traveling in the footsteps of other's trials and tribulations, we come to see the concept of success as a prison and failure as a liberation. In a sense, he challenges us to rethink our current goals, to refocus on the tee and to let go of the chains disguised as success.
At a time when many people are staring at adversity and their own Swiss Alps to cross, Hannibal and Me is inspiring and uplifting.
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on March 10, 2013
Hannibal and Me is a most unusual narrative hybrid--part history, part psychology, part contemporary, part ancient--all of which unify in a thoughtful approach to living the examined life. Andreas Kluth writes with passion and precise style in a narrative approach that draws the reader to his campfire where he regales us in a storytelling reminiscent of Ambrose Bierce.
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on August 18, 2016
Had rarely used nor fully understood the word equanimity and certainly had never come across 'mensch' before reading this book. Insightful, eloquent, engaging and grand. Bravo Andreas!
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on June 4, 2013
Stumbled upon it accidentally, found mention of it in an article. Started reading got really interested. Along the way got more involved with characters. I think book is essential read for any period in life. Especially in transitory periods when you feel lost or uncertain.
I am 100% sure I will read this book again because lessons are invaluable.
To those who love philosophical literature, this one is a must. One of the best books I read
Thanks to the author
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on April 28, 2016
A fascinating history.
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