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Hard Drive Bible: Book, Cd, and Video Hardcover – September, 1996

4.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Hardcover, September, 1996
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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Corporate Systems Center; 8th edition (September 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 096415031X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0964150317
  • Product Dimensions: 3 x 11 x 13 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,140,456 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Hard Drive Bible, VIII Edition

This is a great book for its time, but the ongoing developments of large disks have made a lot of its details obsolete. Much of the historical data is valuable and not readily available to a general audience. Its chapters are not numbered. The use of magnetism for information goes back to around 500 BC when it was used for compasses! In the early 19th century Oersted and Faraday investigated the relation between electricity and magnetism. The first magnetic recording device was patented in 1898 by Poulsen (p.1). The German military used AEG recorders to convert slow speed to high speed for secret transmissions. The first commercially successful digital disk drive was the IBM Model 350 of 1956 (p.2). In the 1960s IBM produced the 1301 Disk Storage unit, and the 1311 Disk pack which had interchangeable units that could hold as much as 25,000 punched cards (2 million characters)! In 1970 IBM announced the 3330 Disk Storage Facility that used the "voice coil" motor to position read/write heads. This method would be used for all micro-computer hard drives. In 1971 IBM produced an 8 inch "diskette" for Initial Program Load [replacing the older 5-card loader]. The first read-write floppy disk was available in 1973 from IBM (p.4). The 3340 Disk Storage Unit had an ultra lightweight recording head that eliminated the need for a head-raising mechanism. Its two platters held 30 million characters; this led to the "30-30" and "Winchester" names. Other competitors produced removable and fixed disk storage units. The floppy disk was also developed to hold more data on a 5.25 inch medium. New development continued for the growing sales of personal computers in the 1980s-1990s. But most disk drive manufacturers lose money!
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Very clear tables of hard drive specs and jumper settings that are useful to those dealing with older equipment.
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By A Customer on March 29, 2000
I think the book had too much talk about complicated things and the illustrations were terrible.
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