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Harvard Business Review Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 102 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

For over 80 years, Harvard Business Review magazine has been an indispensable and unrivaled source of ideas, insight, and inspiration for business leaders worldwide. Each issue contains breakthrough ideas on strategy, leadership, innovation and management. Become a more effective leader by subscribing to Harvard Business Review.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Ellis Atwood on May 18, 2011
Other reviewers have said that you don't get the whole magazine when you get the Kindle edition, but this actually isn't true so I thought I would clarify. The issue here is with the layout of the Kindle edition. For the Kindle, you lose the magazine format and everything is instead linear like a book. The first 20 pages or so are reader comments and summaries of blog posts from the online edition. I imagine in the print edition it is more clear that this is just a discussion section (I don't currently subscribe to print so I can't say), but on the Kindle it reads as if you are just getting condensed articles. If you just stop here without reading on, it really will feel like you're not getting the full magazine. The real content, however, is still there! You just have to use the directional pad to skip the first few sections - same navigation system as found on the Wall Street Journal kindle edition, if you've ever used that. If anyone at HBR is reading this, it really would be helpful to move these sections to the end of the magazine to reduce confusion.

Now for my review. Navigation quirk aside, I'm still giving this five stars. I normally read this on my android phone, and on there the magazine is beautiful, in color, and easy to navigate - if you have an android, I definitely recommend it. The content is unmatched and definitely worth the 6 or so dollars you pay a month.
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I am wondering why wasn't the HBR on Kindle a long time back ! This is one of the perfect examples of a Kindle use. I have had 2-3 years of HBR subscription (physical) and it's such a bother storing them.

I would request / urge / plead the HBR folks to:

- remove all user/ reader reviews from the initial pages ! It's a huge distraction !

- To look at ways and means to improve the look and feel of the subscription on the Kindle. It's 6 dollar an issue and the kindle copy shouldn't be any less than the physical copy for an easy read.
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I love this magazine, and yes, it is the full edition. It's great having it delivered straight to my Kindle, which is my preferred reading platform. HBR does not directly offer the ability to send the magazine to a kindle, only the ability to get print + online + a tablet app (or print + online only, but no online only version or tablet only version).

I have to deduct 1 star though for a key problem. HBR does not recognize this as a subscription, which means you do not have full access to the HBR.org website, its articles, and archives. This means that you cannot have full access to read more than 15 articles a month (the limit for their "free" accounts), or to search their archives.

While the price is good at (currently) $6 a month, it would be worth paying a little more in order to get that access to the online site along with this subscription. I suppose this is something that Amazon and HBR will have to work out (and I have reported this to both, asking them to address it).
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I have subscribed to the print version of HBR for years and have always liked the layout and content.

Moving to digital form it seemed as if magazines only came in one of two forms - text only or full page layout. Text only removed the benefits of layout in the presentation. Full page layout was difficult to read at times, even zoomed - as full length colums require scrolling up and down without any side movement.

With the February 2012 issue of HBR Amazon is offering both views. You can now flip through the full page layout. Scanning and zooming in to find an article you would like then switch to text view if you need to adjust text size for comfortable reading. Furthermore the table of contents makes for quick navigation.

I still wish I could highlight and take notes though. Maybe soon.
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Having seen different reviews here both to the opinion that the Kindle edition of this magazine was and wasn't the full contents of the print edition, I took the trouble to compare the kindle and print editions article by article, and can assure it IS the full contents.
That said, it's maybe the best management magazine around. There are always insightful articles by top management gurus. It's a pity however that so much of the contents are focused in big business and so little in small and medium companies management. But that doesn't change the quality of its contents.
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I subscribed to HBR the moment I received my Kindle Touch. However, I cancelled my subscription even before the 14-day free trial was over. The contents were well-laid and very readable (hence the 3 stars), but the accompanying graphs and pictures were hardly visible. Even after I increased the font I couldn't read the text on the pictures. Sad! I was so much looking forward to reading HBR on my Kindle.
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I received a subscription to HBR as a gift, for which I'm very grateful, although my take on the magazine itself is not entirely positive. My perspective is of someone who has long read the Economist and the Financial Times. Why read HBR? Because it covers topics of urgent interest for people trying to manage companies and organizations. It falls short in three areas:

First is the pervasive consultant-speak: if it sounds like snake oil, it probably is and you're probably being taken for a ride. Your eyes will tire of rolling after the third "The ten critical, life changing principles for yada yada", which can usually be boiled down to a couple of interesting ideas. The magazine itself usually produces one interesting idea for each issue, along with what seems like filler and countless accounts from experts who invariably try to boil down the entire world to their perspective. In the end it's not all that helpful for people actually looking for solutions. The buck needs to stop with those of us who hire consultants and buy publications like HBR: not in plain English, no deal.

A second related problem is the reverential tone with respect to executives, who somehow hold the keys to the universe, until of course you remember so and so sunk the ship, which is very easy to do in the current never ending world recession. From a social or anthropological point of view the HBR is a curious read, a series of articles which seek to affirm your inclusion into a specific group of people; except the world has moved on from the company car, the executive account, the rimless glasses and the Brooks Brothers suits (never mind the Ted Koppel hairdos).
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