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I Have Something to Tell You: A Memoir Hardcover – September 22, 2009

4.4 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Insightful and inspiring." -- Kenneth Cole

"Extraordinary." -- Landon Jones, former managing editor, People magazine

"This is not the life Regan chose. But it is a life she has embraced with courage and passion." -- New Jersey Life

Review

"Insightful and inspiring." -- Kenneth Cole

"Extraordinary."-- Landon Jones, former managing editor, People magazine

"This is not the life Regan chose. But it is a life she has embraced with courage and passion."-- New Jersey Life --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Atria Books; First Edition edition (September 22, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416598596
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416598596
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.1 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #978,596 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Nancy Cosentino on September 15, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I hope everyone will read this touching and compelling memoir.
It will affect you in many ways and remind all of us of how
necessary it is to be informed, compassionate and active in
helping to fight this major health issue everywhere and every
way that we can - together. I especially hope all mothers will
read this and start a dialogue with their children and with each
other. I am very proud to be Regan's mother. Nancy Cosentino
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I loved this book. The author contracted HIV through an unprotected heterosexual encounter. She writes movingly of her initial diagnosis all the way through her role as a proud spokesperson who educates people about HIV/AIDS and fights the stigma associated with it. Be warned - the book pulls no punches about the physical and emotional trauma of living with HIV. Ms. Hofmann's refusal to accept her diagnosis as a death sentence makes this an inspirational story indeed!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a truly readable and gripping account of one young person's struggle with a terrible, life-defining disease and the stigma that goes with it. It is an engaging view of a life before and after coming to terms with HIV, and the defining life's work that comes out of it. This is a book that every parent should read and require their children to read, and every adult who thinks AIDS is under control in this country should read and pass along to others. It is beautifully written, is eminently readable and is a keeper for any personal library. Kudos to a brave and admirable young woman.
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Format: Hardcover
Regan Hofmann's story is one that anyone impacted by the AIDS epidemic will find interesting, insightful and educational. She writes with an easy clarity and compelling courage, telling her story with frankness and humor. The book is a fast read, although some of the most emotionally intense parts demand a rereading to absorb fully the impact of what she has experienced. The narrative alternates stylistically between that of a diarist, an educator and a confessional; each contributes to creating a picture of a woman who lived with an intense secret that was itself a risk to her health, that when burst open was done so with a stylish exuberance and healing relief. Ultimately, she finds the power of service to others, as an AIDS educator and journalist, to become a necessary and fulfilling part of her HIV treatment. Hofmann's story is powerful, especially in its ability to reach women who may think themselves immune to the risk of HIV.

Regan was once POZ's "Anonymous" columnist, secretly embedded in the society of New Jersey's horse country and reporting to POZ readers what others say about people with AIDS when they don't think any such person is within earshot. Today she is the magazine's editor-in-chief.
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This memoir of a young woman learning that she's HIV positive through heterosexual sex is wrenching, powerful, inspiring, and informative. The author writes with searing honesty about being given a death sentence when she was in her late 20's and how she has coped and wrestled with the disease and all its complex issues. In the years since that diagnosis she has faced the demons and become an eloquent and effective spokesperson for how imperative it is for all of us to become informed about HIV/AIDS and to learn to speak about it honestly and openly. I had to read this book in small sittings in order to absorb the roller coaster ride of her medical and emotional journey and to get a grip on the statistics and hard facts of this global epidemic. Read this book and pay it forward. Pamela Parsons
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Format: Hardcover
Regan Hofmann was just 28, still recovering from the hurt and disappointment of a divorce, when she noticed a lump in her groin. Though she was close to her family, she didn't share the doctor's diagnosis with them for several months. She struggled alone as she tried to come to grips with what seemed an obvious death sentence: she was HIV positive.

Yet this memoir is not the story of a dying AIDS victim. There's a new generation of people with HIV, people who are taking the pharmaceutical "cocktails" that make it possible to survive and manage the illness. Certainly she was forced to confront mortality, but as time went on and so did her life, what Hofmann struggled with most was the stigma and fear associated with HIV. She lived for nearly ten years in the closet, with only her closest family members, and medical personnel, aware of her disease.

She had been a freelance writer/editor with a promising career, but for more than a year she stopped working and retreated into self-imposed isolation. Telling family and friends that it was post-divorce depression, she held on by a thread as she came to grips with this blow. She waited for the end.

It chills sympathy a bit to know that Hofmann didn't worry about the rent or the groceries. When at last she confided in her immediate family, no one was concerned about the medical bills. In fact, she moved back home with her two horses, and her parents provided for her while she devoted herself to long rides in the New Jersey countryside. Meanwhile she agonized over the secret of her infection.

Her reactions may seem a little overwrought for someone with virtually no symptoms, and a life of privilege. Many people with AIDS have greater challenges.
Read more ›
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