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Heart of Darkness
Format: Hardcover|Change
Price:$18.66+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on September 24, 2017
A classic that we should all try to read... for a second time, since we all probably had it on our high school reading lists. It is incredible how, with some more years, maturity, and better knowledge of the world, this piece can feel so engaging and still relevant.
1 helpful vote
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on August 11, 2016
If you enjoy philosophical texts that use a journey as a metaphor for self discovery you'll love this book. The powerful imagery is full of significance. However be warned this is not a heart pounding exploration of a jungle. You'll start and end without having gone far at all - unless it you learn something about yourself along the way.
1 helpful vote
2 helpful votes
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on February 28, 2014
Heart of Darkness was a real surprise to me. The book is a must-read classic and it had been on my list for some time. The first time that I read the book I only read to page 10 before I gave up on the book. The beginning is very dull. It just drags on about how London is the greatest city on the earth and how England is the greatest country. Being an American who is not very patient, I just didn't like it. The book itself is only about 150 pages, and if the story continued at the same pace that it was going in the first and second chapters the entire book could take place in a single day. This is how I rationalized hiatus. About a year later I gave the book a second chance. I was pleasantly surprise that the story increases its pace. In fact I would say that the first chapter is woefully out of place and a poor representation of the book as a whole. To all those who are considering to read this book I will say that after you wade through the first couple of chapters you will be rewarded with a rich and entertaining story.
2 helpful votes
3 helpful votes
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on December 30, 2016
I bought this after hearing about it in "Aristotle and Dante discover the secrets of the Universe."

It is a wonderful piece of literature, exploring colonialism. Heavy to read, at times, but truly one of the best works I've read.
1 helpful vote
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on August 28, 2015
I disliked it at first because it's hard to understand due to the great use of complex language and its complex and out of the ordinary story, however, rereading it really allowed me to see how nice and well written it is and the use of language the author uses to explain his message and theme is very nice. It makes you feel like the narrator is talking directly to you, since it is written by a narrator who is listening to the story of "Marlow", the main character of the book. The messages the author displayed helped me understand more about imperialism and racism. However, we are left with a question on whether or not Marlow is racist or not even at the end of the book.
1 helpful vote
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on March 2, 2016
I find this a good analysis of the reality of working in a culture not your own. Continually perplexed by the juxtaposition of "who I really am" and "the realities of my incomprehensible surroundings." Each of us responds differently, some out of control and others with great restraint. Congo brings out the best and the worst...it still does.
1 helpful vote
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on January 27, 2016
A real classic! Apocalypse Now was based loosely on Heart of Darkness. I had no idea this book existed until hearing the quote " The horror.. The horror" being attributed to Joseph Conrad. Book follows main character's tale of his trip up a uncharted river into the heart of Africa in pursuit of Kurtz. Psychological pain and confusion along with a person's place in society is explored. A great read for anyone and especially for fans of Coppola's groundbreaking movie.
1 helpful vote
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on May 6, 2014
Always wondered why this novel has haunted our age. Now I know why: its ambiguity, and the strength of Conrad's prose. It's supremely maddening from a narrative point of view, however. The storyteller recalls a misbegotten assignment, taking a steamer up a river through the jungle to find a mysterious ivory-trader. What he hears about this trader is contradictory. Is he bad or good? A sage or a criminal? Loved or hated? Already dead or still alive? Kurtz becomes a symbol of something he is grasping for, trying to understand. The way the Africans are depicted is also provocative. While Conrad is supremely sarcastic about the colonialists, he regards the Africans themselves from a long, distasteful distance. Keep in mind when this little gem was written, though, and by whom, a brilliant literary renegade.
1 helpful vote
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on January 27, 2017
This is a strange book, but it kind of keeps you reading. My son had to read thismin college and I remember he wrote a really good paper on it. I read it then too. It is very strange but keeps you with it, maybe because it is so strange. Not all that exciting, but strange
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on September 13, 2017
I had some difficulty staying focused with this style of writing. The reader is often simply listening to the main characters thoughts presented in a long stream of perceptions, attitudes, and observations.
1 helpful vote
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