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Heartbeat Detector

4.0 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Heartbeat Detector is a riveting mystery of blackmail and intrigue, where the long-buried secrets of high-powered corporate executives threaten to bring them down.
Mathieu Amalric (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly) is Simon Kessler, a psychologist working for multinational petrochemical corporation SC Farb. Simon's tenacious, rigorous and resilient. His successful role in a corporate downsizing proved to SC Farb's director Karl Rose that Simon is perfect for a delicate situation concerning the firm's head office in Germany. The Germans want a report on CEO Mathias Jüst, who they fear is unfit for his role. The sinister Mr. Rose wants Simon to secretly investigate Jüst.

But Jüst is no fool. Aware of Simon's toiling for Rose, Jüst toys with Simon before challenging him with confidential and compromising information that hints at unspeakable crimes against humanity reaching back to WWII.

Following a dubious suicide attempt, Jüst presents Simon with anonymous letters written to him implicating both Jüst and SC Farb for their allegiance to the Third Reich. When Simon receives similar letters, he digs deeper into the tangled web before him. Simon follows a clue and sets off for an impromptu meeting where blackmail, betrayal, murder and the hierarchy of SC Farb's repressed past will all come to light.

Special Features:
- Theatrical trailer
- 5.1 soundtrack
- Enhanced for 16x9 Tvs
- Optional English subtitles
- Scene selections

Review

A chilling corporate thriller with an intriguing mystery on the surface and a deeply troubling idea at its dark core. --Ken Fox, TV Guide

It has haunted me ever since I saw it. --Andrew Sarris, The New York Observer

A STUNNER! Bold brilliance. Riveting and relentless. --Christopher Null, Filmcritic.com

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Michael Lonsdale, Edith Scob, Mathieu Amalric
  • Directors: Nicolas Klotz
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Anamorphic, Color, Dolby, NTSC, Surround Sound, Widescreen
  • Language: French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    Unrated
    Not Rated
  • Studio: New Yorker
  • DVD Release Date: July 22, 2008
  • Run Time: 141 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0018KZ448
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #196,742 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Heartbeat Detector" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By J. Martin on December 5, 2013
Format: DVD
I understand why some people object to this movie's equating the plight of illegal immigrants and exploited factory workers with the Shoah (the Holocaust).

The Jewish people are at this moment at greater risk than they have been since the Germans exterminated them in Europe during World War II. They are surrounded by hordes of brutal, ruthless monsters no less dedicated to their destruction than the Germans were 70 years ago

But it's worse now, because they are effectively all alone against a force thousands of times larger than they are (billions against a few million), with NOBODY on their side, not even their former official "Protectors", the British.

During the Shoah, most civilized countries supported the Jews' right to exist (in theory, at least); but now the whole world prefers the Palestinians, whose declared aim is the total destruction of Israel. Israel's only remaining friends - the Americans - currently seem more interested in courting Israel's enemies than in insuring Israel's survival.

Anybody who says the nation Israel is not the same as the Jewish people is either criminally deluded or a liar. Israel's enemies hate it because it's Jewish. Period. If they could wipe out the Jews all over the world they'd do it gleefully, but Israel is a much more convenient target, an isolated, vulnerable surrogate for the whole.

In the light of this alarming situation, to compare France's arresting illegal immigrants to Germany's systematically murdering Jewish children is appalling. Nevertheless... I was bowled over by this movie.

It is a deceptively powerful movie - deceptive because it seems to amble so slowly and randomly toward its conclusion; powerful because it makes old news new and vitally important.
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Format: DVD
As consequence of a transcendental top management decision, a Parisian petrochemical company forges on into the 21st century, the human resources psychologist leads a probe that proves the ghosts of the previous century still hold sway over current events in director Nicolas Klotz's labyrinthine drama. Simon (Mathieu Amalric) is a human resources worker who has spent the last seven years working at the Paris branch of a powerful German-based company called SC Farb. In addition, to assessing the hiring and firing practices of the company, Simon was also charged with the task of conducting motivational workshops. When Assistant Director Karl Rose (Jean-Pierre Kalfon) implores Simon to conduct a clandestine assessment of firm director Mathias Jüst's (Michael Lonsdale) mental health after rumors of erratic behavior begin to circulate in the German head office, the shrewd human resources worker forms a factory orchestra as a means of stealthily gauging the stability of his violin-playing subject.

So, as the goal is undertaking, the complex limits between reality and insanity become more and more blurried, the dark web of intrigue continues increasing taking advantage even the very investigator.

Later, a comprehensive investigation of company archives and anonymous letters begin to snake ominously back in time to the darkest days of World War II.

A film that will fascinate to many, but at the same time can make others leave the hall, due the enormous concentration it demands.

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Format: DVD
A film about the goings-on within a corporation from the perspective of the corporate psychologist, Kessler (Amalric). The corporate psychologist is responsible for helping to decide whom to hire, fire or reassign. It is revealed that Kessler's private life is in disarray; his relationship with the woman he loves is strained and he is having an affair with an aggressive woman at the office. Production is down and the CEOs are looking for ways to change that. Kessler wants to use music and bonding experiences to help increase production. He is also given the task of evaluating an executive, Juest (Lonsdale) who's behavior has become erratic. While investigating the profoundly sad Juest, Kessler finds there are terrible secrets involving certain corporate employees that go back to World War II. At one point Kessler reads a report written during World War II and it is a long description of the outfitting of trucks to kill their passengers with tailpipe exhaust. The report is written in a style that is absolutely chilling; it is the most effective scene in the film. After reading the report, Kessler sits on his bed and sobs. Later Kessler sets out to find the man who mailed anonymous letters to the corporate offices; it is a former employee, Neumann. Neumann was fired from the corporation and he's bitter about it. He compares Kessler's job of getting rid of non-productive employees with the Nazi extermination of undesirables. He compares the cold language used in the truck report to the cold language used by corporations regarding their employees.
Although the film was interesting to watch, it meandered a bit too much and I felt the scenes were not connected to each other very well. I think the film needed some additional editing, although perhaps some things are simply lost in translation. The performances of the actors were very good.
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