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From Here to Economy: A Shortcut to Economic Literacy Hardcover – May 1, 1995

4.4 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

"You would probably do just as well choosing a stock by throwing a stockbroker at a dartboard as listening to his advice?and you would save money," opines Buchholz (New Ideas from Dead Economists) in this humorous version of Econ 101. Here he demystifies such terms as inflation, monetary policy, exchange rates and corporate financing and provides a concise history of economic thought from Adam Smith to contemporary supply-side economics. Formerly associate director of economic policy on President Bush's Economic Policy Council and now president of an international consulting firm, Buchholz argues against adopting a Canadian-style national health plan or forcing employers to provide medical coverage. Instead, he says, individuals should be required to obtain their own, to discourage frivolous expenditures. Fortune Book Club selection.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

The news contains major stories about various aspects of the economy, from the stock market to inflation to GATT. For the nonspecialist, the economic concepts involved may be daunting. According to Buchholz, "most people have found economics to be like a bad steak: dry, tough, and tasteless." Buchholz, who has served as associate director of economic policy and deputy executive secretary of the White House Economic Policy Council, here aims to demystify economics. Using contemporary examples to explain key economic principles, he presents an uncomplicated and clear analysis. The book is divided into five parts: macroeconomics, microeconomics, international economics, business and individual investment, and history of economic thought. The appendix lists "Greatest Hits of Economics," including the five top economists; a helpful list of suggested readings is included. Recommended for public libraries as a complement to the author's previous New Ideas from Dead Economists: An Introduction to Modern Economic Thought (NAL, 1989).
Lucy Heckman, St. John's Univ. Lib., Jamaica, N. Y.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Dutton Adult; First Edition edition (May 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0525939024
  • ISBN-13: 978-0525939023
  • Product Dimensions: 20 x 20 x 20 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #873,650 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
"From Here to Economy: A Shortcut to Economic Literacy" by Todd Buchholz, presents a broad overview of contemporary (as of 1995) economic theory. It explains in simple terms the basic principles of contemporary macroeconomics, microeconomics, international economics, investment, and the history of economic philosophy. The target audience for this book is a specific demographic - people who are interested in understanding how the economy works in all respects, but are only really interested in a surface-level understanding of the central issues. This book is not appropriate reading material for economists or students of economics who wish to gain real insight into the nitty-gritty reality of economic theory. If you want to learn about economics, but don't want to spend more than six hours doing so, this is a great book for you to read. The tone of the book is largely informal, frank, and occasionally somewhat humorous. This is not your typically dry economics textbook.
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*From Here to Economy* is a concise and entertaining (if you like the author's sense of humor) introduction to economics. Since the book is only about 250 pages long, the coverage of any given topic is not deep, but the author does touch on the key concepts and explain them at a level appropriate for the literate novice. The book divides the subject into 5 sections: macroeconomics, microeconomics, international trade and finance, personal finance and investing, and schools of economic thought. The section on personal finance and investing will, I think, be particularly useful to the average reader, since it ties the broader economic concepts discussed in the rest of the book into the economic questions that most of us face every day. This section is also the one that struck me as dated, in that it does not mention all the investment information (both good and bad) that is now readily available on the Internet. However, that's a minor flaw in an otherwise very useful work. Readers may also want to look at Sowell's *Basic Economics* -- Sowell gives a fuller discussion of microeconomics, but he's also much more tendentious than Buchholz, is not so good on international topics, and does not discuss personal finance or the history of economic theory.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read a good deal of economics for fun in my spare time (as you can imagine I'm the life of every party). I moved past the basic level this book is aimed at years ago, but nevertheless I still like to pick up a primer on basic economics every now and then just to round things out. This book has been on my Amazon wish list for a decade; where I first saw or heard about it I don't even remember it. Since it is now at a penny used + shipping, I figured what the heck.

It started off a little slow, but by the second chapter the humor took off. The author has a good sense of how to make this stuff interesting, to the limited degree that's even possible with economics (I think it was Ezra Pound who said that he knows of no subject other more difficult to arise an interest in people).

All in all a satisfying purchase. For those looking to explore further into banking in a way that won't put them into a coma, I would recommend Murray Rothbard's work, much of which can be found for free online.
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Format: Paperback
Before reading this book, I had so many basic questions about economics. This book has given me a satisfying level of insight and intuition about economics in general. The style is extrememly digestable. Each section is only a couple of pages, and if I ever forget what "Monetary Policy" is, I just have to look it up and read those two pages. It seems to flow very well, and yet the sections can also be read independently. I highly recommend this book to anybody who is interested in developing a basic "feel" for economics.
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Format: Paperback
I was asked to teach economics this year for the first time in several years. Thank goodness for this book, because without it I do not think I could teach the class. The great thing about this book is that it makes understanding economics easy and fun. Is this book for everyone. Of course not, I do not recommend economics for everyone. However, if you are in the postion where you must learn economics whether as a teacher, student, college student, or who ever this is the book to turn to. Anyone who needs to learn economics will be well off to purchase and read this book. I also highly recommend the authors other book Lessons from Dead Economists. Like this book, it is again highly usefull and extremely readable for the economically challenged. For those of us who need to know economics thank goodness for this book.
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Format: Paperback
This book is an apology to the voters for Bush I's economic policies, including supply-side economics. It says something that not a single well-known economist wrote a blurb for this book's cover. After all, when Wheelan wrote "Naked Economics" he was able to get some. Krugman (himself a very well-respected economist) was able to. Why only this guy can't? Hmmmmmm.
It's because a bit of the information here isn't completely accurate, and he is always biased. He will not consider the role of government seriously, and of course tax-cuts and deregulation are the ultimate panacea. (Of course government has its fingers where they shouldn't be. But why not bother to consider where they should be and shouldn't be, like a real economist?)
On other matters, where there's no room for politics, he's accurate. Which only draws more attention to the difference when politics are involved.
Also, things are just poorly explained. He tries to explain how the Fed's interest rates affect economic growth, inflation and unemployment. But if I hadn't understood that already, there's no way I would have understood his presentation. That kind of thing occurs throughout the book.
Two other, less serious, criticisms. First, a lot of interesting stuff has happened in economics since this book was written. The Asian tigers crashed, currency crises in Mexico, Argentina, Brazil and Russia, the internet stocks and the bubble of the 90s crashing, China and India coming online, and the consequences of Bush II's economic policies. Not covering any of those events is no fault of the author's, but it just means the book is too old.
Second, the writing is not that great, and the humor is terrible. His idea of "humor" is, "Let's say Helen buys bananas.
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