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The Hippies and American Values 1st Edition

4.9 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0870496943
ISBN-10: 0870496948
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Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

The 1960s counterculture movement and its embraced ethical values are the subject of this very readable work. Miller (religious studies, Univ. of Kansas) used the so-called "underground" newspapers of that era as his primary research tool. The result is a thorough look at what the hippies and their allies sought to fundamentally change in the then-entrenched mainstream of American values. There were many bones of contention, but most of what Miller terms "cultural opposition" fall into four main categories: drugs, sex, rock music, and the sense of community. After introducing these areas in their 1960s embodiment, he surveys their effect on the 1990s. The topics are covered in a lively and informative style, though the movement's detractors may find the author a bit too sympathetic to the countercultural movement in his conclusions. Nevertheless, this valuable scholarly effort also makes for interesting pleasure reading.
- David M. Turkalo, Social Law Lib., Boston
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“Miller’s volume deserves to attract a wide circle of interested readers, whether they be students, scholars, or general readers.” —History: Reviews of New Books



 
“The 1960s counterculture movement and its embraced ethical values are the subject of this very readable work . . . a thorough look at what the hippies and their allies sought to fundamentally change in the then-entrenched mainstream of American values. This valuable scholarly effort also makes for interesting pleasure reading.” —Library Journal

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: University of Tennessee Press; 1st edition (September 30, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0870496948
  • ISBN-13: 978-0870496943
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,092,370 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Although it has become fashionable to denigrate the whole hippie era as ineffective and counterproductive, Timothy Miller does much in this book to set the record straight about the considerable legacy of the Counter Culture -- for better or for worse.
From the ethics of sex, dope and rock and roll, to the questioning of property rights and greater latitude in daily speech, from New Age spirituality to more ethical investments in the market place - to the very food we eat - hippie culture has had a tremendous and continuing impact on American society.
*The Hippies and American Values* appears to pick up where Theodore Roszak's book, *The Making of a Counter Culture* left off. More than 20 years ago, Roszak showed how an alienated generation undermined the foundations of the prevailing technocracy. Miller acknowledges this but goes on to point out how the Counter Culture gave free press and credence to right-brain values that they saw as much neglected -- this before "right-brain, left-brain" became buzz words.
"Peace, love and flower power are no longer standard argot," observes Miller, "...Hip culture has bloomed and died like a centuryplant..." But the "new ethics" of the hippies are here to stay nevertheless. They are a potpourri of traditional values, untried social experiments, and a few truly original ideas for an American setting. Hippies attacked new icons such as technocracy while honoring agrarian values coupled with a new hip Eco-consciousness. The Counter Culture dropped out, disaffiliated from the prevailing society and changed themselves in order to change the world.
What I like most about this book is that it is a resource.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is very well researched. I think one of the best things Miller did is in his research phase, he hung out and talked with a lot of people who were (still are?) hippies; he went there, he listened. He returned and developed relationships with the people he wanted to understand. This book also provides good distinction between two of the many civil rights movements going on simultaneously in the 60s: the New Left--political activists, and the counter-culture hippies. Two wings on the same bird, but both having ideological differences that kept the two camps from becoming a united force. This is where the nickname "Fists" and "Heads" came from. Fists being the political activists, and Heads clearly wanted to drop out and disengage from mainstream culture. Clarifications like this are very helpful to understanding the era and all the divergent activity that ultimately had the same goals: human rights, freedom, peace. Thing is, reading this book brings me to realize things have not really changed for all the effort that the Fists and the Heads spent their youth on. Americans are still repressed, stressed, consumers--and it's magnified since the Sixties. In the 60s, though, seems like people may have had time to stop and realize their life had no meaning besides work, bills, keeping up with Jones. Today, so many people don't even have time to stop and realize how insane our great American lifestyle has become.
I grew up as a hippie kid. Miller's book has helped me to understand better what my parents and their friends were trying to do, and why. Today, as an adult, having for many years shared my zany childhood stories, it's clear that mine was not a mainstream childhood. I have long sought to understand my parents motivations.
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By Kimberly! on March 2, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
So for my history college class we had to do a book review, and my professor hinted that he loved a book review written a few years ago over hippies. I was like I must find a hippie book. I'm so glad I got this book it was very informational and entertaining, I wasn't bored at all while writing the book review which is good. Easiest A of my life.
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Format: Paperback
This is a good read but like all books about the hippies and the sixties it completely misses the true genesis of the counterculture: technology. Marshall McCluhan wrote about the technological extensions of humans. The sixty's revealed the first generation which had grown up on television and other new electronic extensions were in fact rebelling against their electronic master. The slavery was in the mind. Everyone over thirty trusted the new direction the culture was headed in and by the seventy's the revolution/rebellion was over. Now hear in 2008 we have put on our ear plugs, eye shades, and as Pete sang, "You know where to put the cork." We took it.
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