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History of Sumer & Akkad;: An account of the early races of Babylonia from prehistoric times to the foundation of the Babylonian monarchy (History of Babylonia & Assyria)

3.0 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Series: History of Babylonia & Assyria
  • Unknown Binding: 380 pages
  • Publisher: Chatto (1916)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00088132S
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought this book for my Kindle because of the $2.99 price and I wanted to learn more about the Ancient Near East. The book is less of a history than an archeological account. The original book was published in 1929. Though the book is quite dated, it would still be of interest as a time capsule of archeology. It must be said, however, that the Kindle version -- which does not have the original illustrations or maps -- is a waste of money and time.

I would be interested in reading the original publication with the illustrations. I cannot recommend the Kindle version.
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Format: Paperback
Leonard W. King's work as an archaeologist and an Assyriologist at Cambridge back in the beginning of the 20th century left him highly qualified for puzzling together the collection of artifacts that had been coming out of southern/central Iraq (or rather, as he will refer to as Babylonia, since Iraq hadn't been "drawn up" by Sykes-Picot yet) over the past few decades. He presents the reader with a gradual immersion into the archaeological process and its unearthings, followed by an interpretation and annotation that he surmises from them. His writing is far from strenuous as one might expect from such a book and such a time (1910), though you might find yourself looking up an occasional word that has gone out of style in the 21st c.. The age of the work does present some problems, however. While excavation turnout never becomes obsolete, a lack of it can cause a once plausible theory to become errored. King focuses on two major epochs; Lagash with the Tello excavation site and Kish representing the Akkadian civilization. His organization of info produced from Tello gives, as far as I'm familiar, an accurate account of the city of Lagash, from early rulers such as Ur-Nina, Eannatum, and Entemena down to Gudea. While attempting to incorporate the surrounding cities, like Umma, Uruk, Ur, etc. into the historical narrative along with them. But when he comes to the Akkadian Empire established by, as he would call him, Shar-Gini-sharri, lack of enough artifacts to make confident conjectures leads to misinterpretations. At this time King and the Mesopotamian scholars did not yet know that Rimush or Manishtushu were Sargon's sons or even immediate successors, only on Naram-Sin was he fairly accurate in accordance to our current understanding.Read more ›
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Format: Kindle Edition
Wow! The book is a mess! Akkadian Dynasty is my area of study and this book is utterly, completely wrong!
The kings of this powerful dynasty are Sargon the Great; Manis-Tusu; Uru-Mush; Naram-Enzu and Shar-Gani-Sherri.
You wuldn't find that out in this book. And the Appendices are not provided, where the chronologies might have helped out.
Do NOT spend any money on this junk.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Interesting very at times repetitive and it is mostly an archeological relation on the theme.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This a very informative study of two very important historical cultures. Anyone who seeks to understand ancient history will be impressed with the content and the scholarship that went into this book.
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