Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The History of Witchcraft... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Item is in excellent condition. May have minor cosmetic damage. Ships next business day!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The History of Witchcraft in England From 1558 to 1718 Hardcover – September 10, 2010

4.0 out of 5 stars 32 customer reviews

See all 41 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$42.36
$38.36 $19.27
Textbook Binding
"Please retry"
$24.99

Intrusion: A Novel
A loving couple, grieving the loss of their son, finds their marriage in free fall when a beautiful, long-lost acquaintance inserts herself into their lives. Learn More
$42.36 FREE Shipping. In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Wallace Notestein (1878 - 1969) was an American historian, and Sterling Professor of English History at Yale University from 1928 to 1947. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 460 pages
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing, LLC (September 10, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1169793525
  • ISBN-13: 978-1169793521
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 1 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,087,289 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Anthony Spadaro on June 7, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I bought This book in the free kindle edition - I'll read almost anything so long as it is well written and inexpensive.

For those looking to research the subject this is a treasure trove of accurate information about Witch prosecutions in England during the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. It is about England - only. There are only a few paragraphs about the Salem trials and I don't remember any names coming up in that section - certainly no family histories. For me the multitude of brief and very similar case histories grows all too familiar - I was looking for something more casual and more about witches. Had it been much longer I probably would have given up on it.

I would not, in fact, even have bothered to "REVIEW" the book, except that I feel the need to counter the dis-information of another review. (Yeah it's after Midnight and I have to correct something I read on the internet. I'm that guy).

I really only checked out the reviews, hoping to gain a lead to a book that might be more interesting. Instead I found a glowing 5 star review written by someone must have read a different book, and an equally uninformative 1 star review by someone who feels strongly negative about the book but never states "why" he or she has this feeling. I can't tell if the writer is pro-witch or anti-witch or even understands that this book is more than 100 years old. Since the book is about the outcome of historically recorded trials, none less than 290 years ago, I find it hard to comprehend the anger.

There is NO information here about the families living in Salem, Mass during the witch-hunts in this book. The book barely mentions the American trials and certainly never goes into the geneology of the Salem families.
Read more ›
2 Comments 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is more a history of witchcraft trials and outcomes in England, rather than of witchcraft itself. The writing is dry bordering on dull, which is to be expected of a textbook from the period in which this one was written. It's factual accounts, with no summation or interjection from the author.

I've read a lot about the Salem witch trials that took place here in the US, but I had little knowledge about the events in England that precipitated Salem. I found the history interesting, though I was continually spacing midway into the book. There is a lot of repetition in cases, as far as details and the way the stories are told.

Overall, this book offers an interesting glimpse into history, but offers no explanations as to how and why it all occurred.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
My only issue with this book is that the author often gets going on a topic and then says that "the rest isn't worth going into," or words to that effect. He piques the reader's curiosity and then fails to follow through. This occurs several times throughout the book. Otherwise the book was interesting and informative.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It's extremely interesting to realize the similarities of witchcraft in England to that in New England. In school you are taught about Salem and the witch hunts and then you learn of people who actually practice witchcraft. Then you learn that it wasn't unique to the US, but was just as alive in England around the same time.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
There is vast literature about the history of witchcraft, both in this country and in Europe. I decided to go back to this book, written in the early 1900s; and I was not disappointed. It is a model of clarity and explains the history of witchcraft in the UK between the early modern period – from 1556 to 1735. To my way of thinking it is a more satisfactory book than Hugh Trevor-Roper European Witch Craze in the 16th and 17th centuries, because it provides a better narrative. Indeed one could say that there are too many cases here and not enough analysis; but that suited my purpose.

The book is entertaining. I liked the story of William Harvey’s dissection of a toad, which an old lady said was her ‘familiar’. It turned out that it was an ordinary toad, with no sign of the Devil on it, or in it; but the old lady was most displeased that Harvey had cut it open.

The book is particularly good on the legal aspects of witchcraft prosecutions. It shows that the Act of 1604 was brought in at the behest of James I, and that this made it a felony, for the first time, to conjure spirits. (Previously, the prosecution has to show that the witch had brought about someone’s death). This Act remained on the statute book until 1735; but in the meantime, it had become virtually impossible to secure a conviction, because first the Judges and then the public became convinced that, in fact, spirits did not exist; and witches were in the main pathetic old women who suffered from delusions.

But it took time to arrive at this position, because many feared that if there were no spirits, then there was no Devil and if there was no Devil, then there was no God. So for many years those who wrote in favour of a change in the law were liable to be accused of atheism.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Not to be read for pleasure, but if one wants to know of the history of witchcraft, it gives many names, dates, and place to begin. I had a long ago relative who was accused of witchcraft, hence the interest in it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The History of Witchcraft in England From 1558 to 1718
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The History of Witchcraft in England From 1558 to 1718

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?