Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Pre-order
$23.99
Free Shipping for Prime Members | Fast, FREE Shipping with Amazon Prime
This title will be released on February 21, 2017.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow Hardcover – February 21, 2017

4.5 out of 5 stars 53 customer reviews

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$23.99
$23.99
Pre-order Price Guarantee. 1 Applicable Promotion(s)


Read ambitiously. $12 for 12 weeks
The Wall Street Journal Digital Membership. Coverage you can get behind. Learn more
$23.99 Free Shipping for Prime Members | Fast, FREE Shipping with Amazon Prime This title will be released on February 21, 2017. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow
  • +
  • Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind
Total price: $46.68
Buy the selected items together

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Pre-order Price Guarantee! Order now and if the Amazon.com price decreases between your order time and the end of the day of the release date, you'll receive the lowest price. Here's how (restrictions apply)

Editorial Reviews

Review

About the Author

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Hardcover: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Harper (February 21, 2017)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062464310
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062464316
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.4 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,973 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

This item has not been released yet and is not eligible to be reviewed.
Reviews shown are from Amazon Vine™ and other formats of this item.

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Audience: Readers looking ahead to the future and wondering what the world may look like in 100 years. People interested in all aspects of humanity and the science, psychology, technology and politics behind everything we have done, are doing and will do in the future.

Summed up in a few words: Relevant. Unbiased. Necessary.

First Impression: Homo Deus was a book I was really excited to read! The tagline ' A brief history of tomorrow' really intrigued me as I don't really put much thought into my life life years down the line. This book is a must read! Not only does Harari talk about the future, he does so in such a wide spectrum of elements and details that I was impressed by how much information I took in. It also helps that he kept the language to an accessible and easy to read level, though there is technicality in some of the areas of the text. When I finished the book I was stuck between two very distinct and conflicting thoughts, the first was that I am comfortable with the steps that we as humans are taking to secure our futures and the other is that I am massively concerned about our future.

Book Summary/Review

Homo Deus: A Brief History Of Tomorrow is one of many groundbreaking books that are coming out this year that will influence certain non-fiction titles for the next decade or so. I have many of these books on my to-read list but I started with Homo Deus as it seem like a book that would cover all the bases and show me what we as humans are doing to secure our futures on earth and how we plan to do so. Yuval Noah Harari definitely achieves this, though it took a long time to get to sections I really wanted to read.
Read more ›
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Yuval Noah Harari's "Homo Deus" continues the tradition introduced in his previous book "Sapiens": clever, clear and humorous writing, intelligent analogies and a remarkable sweep through human history, culture, intellect and technology. In general it is as readable as "Sapiens" but suffers from a few limitations.

On the positive side, Mr. Harari brings the same colorful and thought-provoking writing and broad grasp of humanity, both ancient and contemporary, to the table. He starts with exploring the three main causes of human misery through the ages - disease, starvation and war - and talks extensively about how improved technological development, liberal political and cultural institutions and economic freedom have led to very significant declines in each of these maladies. Continuing his theme from "Sapiens", a major part of the discussion is devoted to shared zeitgeists like religion and other forms of belief that, notwithstanding some of their pernicious effects, can unify a remarkably large number of people across the world in striving together for humanity's betterment. As in "Sapiens", Mr. Harari enlivens his discussion with popular analogies from current culture ranging from McDonald's and modern marriage to American politics and pop music. Mr. Harari's basic take is that science and technology combined with a shared sense of morality have created a solid liberal framework around the world that puts individual rights front and center. There are undoubtedly communities that don't respect individual rights as much as others, but these are usually seen as challenging the centuries-long march toward liberal individualism rather than upholding the global trend.

The discussion above covers about two thirds of the book.
Read more ›
2 Comments 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Steve Watson on November 15, 2016
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It begins so well, but the latter third reads as though it was still in draft when the author decided he had better things to do than finish what he started. Worth reading for the fantastic insights he has crafted as building blocks, but I'm not sure he has finished the building.
1 Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An excellent sequel to the original and very easy to follow. It felt a little repetitive in parts until I realised that the concepts proposed are so new and different. I found that Mr Harari's style allowed me to retain and reinforce the threads and ideas in mind as I continued to read through to the conclusion.
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Harari has managed to again produce a very inspiring, innovative treasure of provoking ideas. This work should be considered an intellectual masterpiece, worth reading and rereading, and its ideas, wether one agrees with them or not, each can serve as seeds of deep and very necessary thinking and processing.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
A great continuation of Sapiens

I loved Yuval Harari’s book Sapiens, so I looked forward to reading Homo Deus and I wasn't disappointed. In this book, Harari discusses one possibility of human evolution but this is based on history which is an interesting take. Harari actually spends a lot of time on history but I found that both the title and subtitle of the book didn’t really match the content which is far more interesting than the title might lead one to believe. Harari writes in a clear, conversational tone and doesn’t get bogged down in needless detail. I found the book difficult to put down. Harari includes some personal parameters and at times his sense of humor shines through. Clearly this is not a biology book, but uses history to talk about what might happen. For a more biological assessment of where we are headed, I strongly recommend Future Humans by Scott Solomon.
Disclosure: I received an advanced reader copy of this book for review purposes.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews