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Hotel Rwanda: Bringing The True Story Of An African Hero To Film (Shooting Script) Paperback – January 27, 2005

3.8 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In 1994, Rwanda endured a genocide of about 800,000 people, mostly minority Tutsi slaughtered by machete-wielding Hutu, the country's majority. During the three months of killing, Paul Rusesabagina, now often called the Rwandan Schindler, sheltered and saved more than 1,200 people in the hotel he managed in the capital city of Kigali. Hotel Rwanda is of course the acclaimed film about Rusesabagina, played by Don Cheadle; George is the film's director, and in this powerful volume he marshals writings by himself and others that provide context and commentary on both the movie and the holocaust that prompted it. The book most notably includes the screenplay of Hotel Rwanda by Keir Pearson and George, an inspiring and devastating script. Of only slightly less emotional impact is the transcript of "The Triumph of Evil," a Frontline/PBS documentary about the genocide and the West's (and the U.N.'s) neglect of it--among the commentators is Philip Gourevitch, whose We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families helped bring the genocide to global attention. Pieces by Pearson and George explain their involvement in the project (it all began in 1999 when a novelist friend of Pearson's told him Rusesabagina's story), followed by two journalists' accounts (by Brit Nicola Graydon and Hollywood reporter Anne Thompson) of Rusesabinga and the movie; a "history" section explains Rwanda's past. Also included is a list of books, Web and other resources. George writes in an epigraph, "For the dead of Murambi. I will never forget." This important book will inspire others to take the same vow. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"Don Cheadle is heartbreaking in the true story of a Rwandan hotel manager protecting native Tutsis from the genocidal Hutu militia in Hotel Rwanda."
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Product Details

  • Series: Shooting Script
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Newmarket Press; First Edition edition (January 27, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557046700
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557046703
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #900,291 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
"Hotel Rwanda" is a great movie. It tells us plenty about what happened in Rwanda in 1994, a year in which ten percent of the nation's population died, including most of the minority Tutsi population. Most were slaughtered by the majority Hutus, with machetes.

This book has an appendix that includes the entire screenplay of the movie. And it has a very interesting transcript of a PBS show about the genocide called "The Triumph of Evil." In addition, it discusses the making of the movie.

I've never been in Rwanda, so let me say what questions I had that I hoped this book (and the movie) might shed some light on:

1) Fear. I think the movie is excellent at showing the constant fear on the part of the Tutsis. But what about the killers? Were they scared? I couldn't tell. It was awfully difficult for me to comprehend what would make people go out and massacre their neighbors with machetes.

2) Betrayal. The movie does explain that it would have taken relatively little effort for outside troops to stop the slaughter. And it shows some of the politics that appear to have prevented this. But betrayal was not only by the United Nations, France, and a variety of other Western nations. There was also betrayal by the Catholic church, given that most of the killers and most of the victims were Catholics. We don't see much of that. But the book tells us that many Tutsis tried to seek refuge in the churches only to be killed in them.

3) Ugliness. I was curious about appearances in such times. Some folks say that people who are perceived to be ugly, grubby, impoverished, or disheveled are easier to see as dehumanized, putting them at greater risk in slaughters.
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Format: Paperback
I cried from beginning to end. This incredible movie makes you feel as if you are actually in the middle of the violence. You are absolutely terrified and helpless the entire time, and your heart absolutely shatters into a million pieces as you watch the injustice of genocide made very real and very personal. This movie will change your life.
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Format: Paperback
In 1994 as his country was experiencing insanity, hotel manager Paul Rusesabagina used wits and courage to save over a thousand people from certain death. His life story was captured in the film "Hotel Rwanda", and this movie companion, Hotel Rwanda: Bringing The True Story Of An African Hero To Film, documents the film's story, providing first-person pieces by Terry George and co-writer Keir Pearson from their struggle to gain financing and produce the film. Over 70 photos and movie stills capture the film's history, production challenges, and drama.
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Format: Paperback
I recently watched "Hotel Rwanda" on DVD. Next, I got a copy of the book. It's a powerful true-life story, but it lacks something. For one thing, it lacks what one Amazon reviewer described as a comprehension of what would "make people go out and massacre their neighbors with machetes." There's a powerful presence of evil in this true-life story, an evil that inspired hundreds of thousands of people to murder hundreds of thousands of men, women, and children. Surely, it would take more than radio messages of a madman to incite so many people to commit so many murders.

I had previously heard predictions of a massacre in Rwanda years before it happened. The mother of Christ was reported to have appeared to six girls and one boy in Rwanda starting in late 1983. In 1991, Ernest Rutaganda, one of the visionaries, was told through a vision that there would be a massacre of Tutsit and that President Habyarimana would be killed by his friends. This was two years before the event, but the other earlier predictions have been publicized ten years before the event.

I know the press is very skeptical of apparitions, but wouldn't you think that someone who lived through the massacre and wanted to tell the world about it would realize that mentioning the predictions would have added greater depth to the story? The predictions and their subsequent fulfillment would have alerted people of all races and all nations that these warnings (at Rwanda and similar warnings at Medjudgorje, Cuapa, Akiba, Fatima, Garabandal, and others-all available on the Internet) are meant for all of us. There is an evil presence in the world, a spiritual presence that is fully capable of influencing millions of people simultaneously.
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By Marco P on February 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
I don't know which category to put this book/movie into.

It certainly does not reflect a really life story and has little fiction character.

It does nothing to justify the genocide all it does is forming endless monologue of blame mainly to the West.

Koffi A is not a westerner and nothing is said about him.

As a survivor of 94 I find it insulting to me and the memory of my beloved late family.

Shame on Paul for even aggreeing to be portrayed in this light. it does definitely says why during that time only those who could afford it were allowed in the Hotel doors contrary to what is portrayed in the story. he definitely applied the rule "WERE ALL NOT EQUAL"

Absolute rubbish, good acting though
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