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Comment: The covers have creases and scratches but the book remains well protected and tight. Some pages have marks and writings but most are clean. It has no tears to the pages and no pages will be missing from the book. The spine of the book is in great condition. Still very much extremely usable. Sorry but please do not buy if you are more particular with the appearance rather than the content.
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How Does a Poem Mean?: Part three of An Introduction to literature, by Herbert Barrows, Hubert Heffner, John Ciardi, and Wallace Douglas Paperback – 1959

5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 1028 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin (1959)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0007FVKES
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #748,190 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By B. Tupper on October 29, 2006
I think this is the best work on the usage of words ever written in the English language. Using examples of "good" and "bad" language and imagery from a number of well-known poems, Ciardi does a marvelous job of demonstrating what makes language effective. It is primarily aimed at poetry, but the principles work for expository prose as well. This first edition is the best, being smaller and more direct to the point. The subsequent edition he did with Miller Williams is less well focused, getting so eggheadish in places that it hardly makes sense. There is a later hardcover edition, which I have not seen. It might be simply a reprint of the 1959 edition. I hope so. I would very highly recommend this book for anyone who wants to use the English language more effectively.
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I think this is the best work on the usage of words ever written in the English language. Using examples of "good" and "bad" language and imagery from a number of well-known poems, Ciardi does a marvelous job of demonstrating what makes language effective. It is primarily aimed at poetry, but the principles work for expository prose as well. This first edition is the best, being smaller and more direct to the point. The subsequent edition he did with Miller Williams is less well focused, getting so eggheadish in places that it hardly makes sense. There is a later hardcover edition, which I have not seen. It might be simply a reprint of the 1959 edition. I hope so. I would very highly recommend this book for anyone who wants to use the English language more effectively.
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A classic. Easily understood commentaries on what makes a poem, and what makes a good poem.
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A classic. Best introduction to reading poetry I know.
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