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How To Make Luck: Seven Secrets Lucky People Use To Succeed Paperback – December 15, 1998

4.6 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

If you want to be lucky, throw away that lottery ticket. How to Make Luck by Marc Myers lets you in on seven secrets of successful and lucky people, from former Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee and the Today Show's Matt Lauer to money manager James O'Shaughnessy and poker champion Barbara Enright. Myers believes that people make their own luck. "The people we think of as lucky behave in ways that are so special and seductive that nearly everyone they meet feels compelled to offer them great opportunities. And it is this wealth of opportunities that allows them to continuously improve their good luck," he writes. Luck, advises Myers, means mastering one or two of these lucky behaviors: Make life look easy, but don't rub it in; make yourself appealing; be as curious as a child; improve the lives of other people; let power brokers own a piece of you; don't burn your bridges. The book includes chapters on each of these secrets as well as interviews with successful people and tips for limiting bad luck. Myers is a fortunate person himself, having risen quickly at the New York Times, Adweek and elsewhere. He is now editor of two national consumer newsletters, Bottom Line/Personal and Moneysworth. The book could be a lucky charm for anyone looking to get ahead, in business and in life. --Dan Ring
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Renaissance Books; 1st edition (December 15, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1580630588
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580630580
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #316,635 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book is great. The title can be a little misleading. The book is about behaviors you can adopt to influence things to go the way you want them to. It's not a new age hocus pocus book. It is a real world street smart book on a variety of ways to influence people and situations to go well for you.

There are a lot of suggestions on improving your luck in addition to the seven main methods that the author lists in the table of contents. Some of it is commonsense, but sometimes we need a reminder. Some of the advice is immeadiately applicable. Get this book!!
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There are a lot of self-help books out there, and many of them just saying the same boring thing. This book, however, is really smart and practical. It should rank up there with Napolean Hill and Dale Carnegie as a classic book on creating success. I felt his strategies were very realistic, made a lot of sense, and are doable! Easy to read and very enjoyable. I'd definitely recommend it.
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Format: Paperback
"Have you ever said, 'If it weren't for my bad luck, I'd have no luck at all?' According to Marc Myers, author of How to Make Luck, luck is not random at all. Here's how to do it, he claims:

1. Instead of envying other people's luck, make a list of what is positive in your life. Envy saps luck-attracting energy.

2. Really connect when you meet people: smile warmly, look in their eyes, remember their name. A chance meeting often brings luck.

3. Let go of mistakes quickly by focusing on the positive.

4. Write down your goals and the people who can help you make them happen.

5. Make time and space for opportunity to knock. If you're too busy running around distracted, you won't recognize a lucky break when it occurs." (review by M.J. Ryan, author of The Happiness Makeover)

I was pleased to find out about this book, as I do believe that laying the right groundwork and positioning yourself for good things to happen will certainly improve your "luck." When people call a good golf shot lucky, my husband says, "The more I practice, the luckier I get." (Virginia Allain)
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Format: Paperback
It's easy to credit the success of others to luck--just happening to be at the right place at the right time. Not so, says author Marc Myers. Successful people make their own luck, the author says, and he cites case studies to prove his point. What we see as luck is usually the product of lots of hard work, and a willing to take some chances. (I personally know how hard at least one of his subjects worked--which, to me, proves the author's thesis). Certainly worth reading for anyone who wants some clues on what "luck" is all about--and about how the harder you work, the luckier you are apt to be.
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Format: Paperback
If you have subscribed &/or read the series of Bottom Line/Personal newsletter, then you will not be disappointed by this book. The author of this book also happens to be the editor of the newsletter.

In the 80's as well as 90's, I pursued & applied many of the strategies outlined in the newsletter. Some of the strategies have been artfully captured in this wonderful book.

To a lot of people, writings about luck may seem to be hyperbolic stuff. From my personal experience, and I am sure most readers will concur with me, luck is, in reality, OPPORTUNITY + PREPARATION.

Always remember this, opportunity only knocks once at every man's door. So if it comes knocking at your door, & if you are not prepared to receive (in this case, hear) it, it's gone!

In a nut shell, this book shows you how to be prepared for luck. Are you ready?

I would like to say this, the strategies outlined in this book, when applied, will build & enhance your personal anticipatory management skills. Anticipation is a very important skill.
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