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The Human Brand: How We Relate to People, Products, and Companies by [Malone, Chris, Fiske, Susan T.]
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Length: 208 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Q&A with Chris Malone and Susan Fiske, authors of The Human Brand

When people make statements like "I hate my cable company" or "I love my smartphone," what's happening there psychologically?

As humans, we have developed a remarkable ability to draw quick conclusions about others based on surprisingly little information. We use those same powers of detection to draw conclusions about the people we buy products and services from, even if we never have direct contact with them. We infer a great deal about the intentions of our cable companies and smartphone makers from the experience we have with their products and services, as well as all the information about them we are exposed to. As a result, whether we realize it or not, we are not actually loyal to companies or brands, but rather we are loyal to what we believe we know about the people behind them.

How did you two first meet and come to work together?

I (Chris) first stumbled upon Susan's work through an article in Harvard Business Review, which led me to discover Susan's extensive academic research on warmth and competence. I contacted Susan with an email that started with, "I've become a fan of your work," and proposed that we test whether her human perception model was predictive of how customers relate to companies and brands. It's been a wonderful and enlightening journey together ever since.

What do you mean by warmth and competence?

Leading researchers and social psychologists have shown that we judge others almost instantly along two dimensions: What are the intentions of other people toward me? And how capable are they of carrying out those intentions? In the academic world, these two categories of social perception are known as warmth and competence, respectively, and they drive most of our emotions and behavior toward other people.

Through our research over the past three years, Susan and I have discovered that customers engage with and become loyal to companies and brands in the same way they do with other people—on the basis of their warmth and competence.

Which companies and brands did you find are successfully building lasting relationships with their customers? Which ones are failing?

There are many companies and brands, large and small, that use technology to build and maintain one-to-one relationships with customers. Some examples from our book include Zappos, Domino's, and Mercedes, as well as Dr. Kelly Faddis, Zane's Cycles, and Honest Tea. What these companies have in common is that they put the best interests of their customers ahead of their own short-term financial interests.

On the other hand, companies that focus heavily on maximizing shareholder value in the short term end up doing themselves more harm than good in the process. Despite their other successes, large companies like Toyota, Sprint, and Goldman Sachs have learned this lesson the hard way and are still recovering from their missteps. Perhaps not surprisingly, banks, oil companies, airlines, and telecom firms dominate the list of most disliked companies. What these have in common is a reputation for profiting at their customers' expense.

Review

“Sean Runnette is a wise choice as narrator of this work. . . . Insightful not only for those who create and market products and services but also for all of us who consume them.”
      —AudioFile



“Narrator Sean Runnette’s solid, steady voicing nicely conveys the impressive substance in the work.”
      —Library Journal


Product details

  • File Size: 1668 KB
  • Print Length: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (September 10, 2013)
  • Publication Date: September 10, 2013
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00EFB44ES
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #467,341 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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