Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$4.60
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from the UK. Former Library book. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Your purchase also supports literacy charities.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Human Condition Mass Market Paperback – 1959

4.4 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$4.60

Up to 50% off select Non-Fiction books
Featured titles are up to 50% off for a limited time. See all titles
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 385 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday; First Edition Thus edition (1959)
  • ASIN: B000GRFTTO
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,673,287 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
40%
4 star
60%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
In "The human condition", Arendt distinguishes three kinds of activities the human being is capable of: labor, action and work. I will attempt to explain the first two, and I will leave the third to you so as to motivate you to read the book :)
Labor is, according to Arendt, those human activities whose main aim is to allow men to survive, for example eating, drinking and sleeping. These activities belong to the private sphere, and while the human being strives painstakingly to perform them, he is not free.
On the other hand, Action is the moment when the human being develops the capacity that distinguishes him, the ability of being free. This is the public sphere, where men, after having provided for themselves and their families what was needed to "continue in existence", can at last be free.
Arendt shows us the historical evolution of these concepts, and how that evolution is connected to the evolution of the concept of work. At the end of this book, you will have analyzed with her the human condition, from the point of view of the activities that the human being is capable of. What is more, you will be able to have a valid view regarding the past, and an interesting perspective on what is happening now, and on what the future may bring to us. Yes, it is true that this book was released a long time ago, but I believe that it is still as important now as it was then.

Arendt (1906-1975) was a respected professor and thinker, who wrote books that greatly influenced quite a few of her contemporaries. Even though her more significant book was "Origins of Totalitarianism" (1951), "The human condition" is also essential in order to understand her ideas.
Read more ›
Comment 73 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Johanna "Hannah" Arendt (1906-1975) was a German-born political theorist, who wrote many books such as Antisemitism: Part One of The Origins of Totalitarianism, Imperialism: Part Two Of The Origins Of Totalitarianism, Totalitarianism: Part Three of The Origins of Totalitarianism, Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil, The Life of the Mind, On Violence, etc.

She wrote in the Preface to this 1958 book, “What I propose, therefore, is very simple: it is nothing more than to think what we are doing. ‘What we are doing’ is indeed the central theme of this book. It deals only with the most elementary articulations of the human condition, with those activities that traditionally, as well as according to current opinion, are within the range of every human being.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
THE HUMAN CONDITION is among the top 10 most important theoretical works of the 20th century, and Arendt arguably among the greatest social theorists. For me, this book qualifies Arendt as the one greatest social theorist of modern times. Hannah Arendt will cure you of making false assumptions about something we like to call "human nature." That is dangerous and always has been. Instead, she explores the "human condition" and after reading this book the first time over thirty years ago I have returned time and again when I have lost my way.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Isaiah Berlin famously said that he thought Hannah Arendt was an incoherent thinker. W.H. Auden claimed that THE HUMAN CONDITION was the kind of book he would have preferred to be writer for him alone.

Auden was a close friend of Arendt, so close, in fact, that he proposed to her shortly after he husband died, which is not only surprisingly like Claudius but even stranger because Auden was a homosexualist. Could his reaction to the book be a reflection of his feelings for Hannah?

If so, you wonder if Berlin and Arendt had a personal encounter that influenced his judgment.

In any case, this book is not incoherent, but neither is as revelatory as Auden claims. It's worth reading, however, as are most of Arendt's other books, in spite of the influence of the unspeakable Heidegger on her philosophical views.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Pretty good.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse