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on August 2, 2015
This is my first book read of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. And while I found it quite complex in the beginning, with all the names and family ties mixing among each other, the further I read, the more I loved the story, its characters and the way in which the story was told. A true masterpiece.
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on May 20, 2014
I ordered the the as an homage to Marquez who I believe is 9ne of the greatest writer's of of time. I was most sadened to learn of his death. I have read this wonderful book in Spanish. It is best in that language because only that language can capture the true esence of the Buendia family of Mocado and the culture it represents.It is, nevertheless, a treasure in English. Don't fil to read it at some point in your journey as a reader.
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on August 1, 2013
From Colombia, Garcia Marquez provides us with a great example on magical realism. The wealth of stories and detail, takes us travelling together with the autor to mystical and down to earth Macondo, the epicenter of the story that spans generations. If you value an interesting and rich reading, this book might be for you.
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on February 14, 2017
An amazing book from the South American classics for mature readers that challenges typical perceptions of reality. You will find yourself double-taking often, but that just gets you even more engaged with the twisting plot.
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on December 31, 2016
The best book ever it's the type of book that you read many times and you discover something diferent
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on February 21, 2016
a fantasy novel about the many adventers of a family through many generations.
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on April 29, 2009
Thumbs up to Gabriel Garcia Marquez' fantastical epic novel, "100 years of Solitude"! It is the story of Macondo, a fictional South American town founded by the bold patriarch of the Buendia clan, Jose Arcadio Buendia. Twenty households of folks subsist in peace and relative isolation, minding their own business, until hosts of visitors and newcomers, bringing new ideas--scientific, political, and economic--descend upon the sleepy village. These developments, along with the growth and development of the Buendias through generations, lead to unexpected and often bizarre and tragic results.

Marquez' imagination seems to know no bounds, as he recounts story after incredible story in ridiculous detail, which are bound together with certain common recurring themes. The style of the novel, "magical realism", means that the most freakish stories are told in the same matter-of-fact tone as the most prosaic ones. Marquez grew up in the home of his grandparents, natural story tellers, who related countless such tall-tales in such a way, blurring the boundaries of reality and unreality. My favorite of these tall tales is the part, toward the end of the book where it rains for "four years, eleven months, and two days". What they went through during that time was hilarious and outlandish!

Another big theme is the recurring personalities of the male Buendias across five generations. The author does a good job of creating real and interesting characters, but I particularly enjoyed some of the female ones, as they were each quite different and extraordinary. Ursala, the matriarch, is a central central figure who lives over a hundred years, during which she works endlessly to care for the family throughout the generations. Fernanda, the wife whom Aureliano Segundo takes from a ruined aristocratic family in "the Highlands", never really fits in. The best Fernanda scene is during the rainy season, when she drones on complaining at Aureliano for an incredible three pages with just one sentence!

One of the many themes in the book that interest me is the strong sense of irony which pervades the novel on many levels. The overriding irony which also underlies the whole story is the circular nature of time--the recurring personality types and their dysfunctional actions which they seem doomed to repeat. This is an irony of tragic futility. At times it seems tedious, but the author uses it to brilliant effect, and particularly at the end, where the story culminates with one surprising final ironic twist.

These are just a few of my ideas and reflections about this monumental work. Lastly, I suggest that you buy one of the other editions of the book because this one is rather flimsy and cheaply made. The Oprah book club edition (which I have not seen) can be had for $7.00, including shipping, and the hardback for $11.12, if you click on the words "32 new". I hope this helps. Enjoy!
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VINE VOICEon August 7, 2017
I can't believe it took me 60 years to discover and read this book. It's excellent!
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on August 12, 2017
One of the best books I have ever read. It is a very magical story that encompasses war, love, death and especially the adverse affects of imperialism. It is not plot driven, but the prose is beautiful. No wonder he won the Pulizer Prize!
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on June 27, 2001
The title of this book says it all, One Hundred Years of Solitude. It is, in my opinion, as monumental a work as Moby-Dick because it isn't about one thing, or two things, it is about everything! Marquez never fails to surprise with his writing, the wonderful poetic way he tells of how people try to keep an ounce of humanity in the face of the vicious meat-grinder which we call life is absolutely amazing. Reading a Marquez book is the sensory equivalent to the smell of an impending thunderstorm and is the tactile equivalent of moist earth. If that description seems odd, it will seem fitting after you finish this book.
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