Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$8.78
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

I Dream of Microwaves Hardcover – April 14, 2004

4.4 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$9.67 $0.01

2016 Book Awards
Browse award-winning titles. See all 2016 winners
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

In his smashing debut story collection I Dream of Microwaves, Imad Rahman navigates the world of marginal actors looking for work--and love--in quirky, unseemly venues. Following the travails of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, a young Pakistani actor whose career highlight has been playing perpetrators in crime reenactments on America's Most Wanted, Rahman offers over-the-top episodes of astounding wit and hilarity, in no particular chronological order, as Kareem: finds work as a costumed hawker of a trendy drink at a dive bar where he battles a dwarven rival for the crowd's business; reprises Brando's role of Kurtz in a musical production of Apocalypse Now at the Steak 'N Stage dinner theatre; and partakes in his recurring girlfriend, Eileen's, plan to pry money from her philanthropic grandmother. In the latter, title story, Kareem pretends to be a Bosnian war survivor, pitted against Eileen's ruse. The B-listers recognize each other and, rather than tattle, enter into a duel of "acting one-upsmanship," telling increasingly grandiose stories of atrocity and third-world living. After joining a Shakespeare troupe stranded in Pakistan and watching their driver revive his van with a mouthful of gas, then immediately light a cigarette without incident, Kareem: "expected his head to pop off with a bang, flames bellowing out his open neck." Self-deprecating and funny, Kareem is a memorable thespian worth following around. --Michael Ferch

From Publishers Weekly

Rahman's deadpan first collection of eight linked stories gets off to a promisingly weird start when Pakistani-American actor Kareem Abdul-Jabbar receives a letter and a one-way bus ticket from Eileen, an old girlfriend, who announces she's "through with big dicks and henceforth thinking constantly of you." It's a great opening scene, and a taste of what's to come. Kareem's career as a stand-in on television crime dramas like America's Most Wanted has ground to a halt, so joining Eileen in Ohio could be the fresh start he's been craving. Instead, Kareem winds up at the dinner table debating the plight of Bosnia with Eileen's sister Cecilia and her cannibal husband from the South Pacific, then gets a surprise marriage proposal from Eileen. The interrelated stories that follow jump somewhat awkwardly back and forth in time. After being abandoned by now ex-wife Eileen due to his excessive drinking, Kareem begins a miserable stint as a Zima spokesman. In later installments, he walks dogs for Manhattan's elite and works as a repo man recovering unreturned video tapes along with fellow actor Valentina, a woman whose speech consists only of movie dialogue. Meanwhile, he lands roles in a musical version of Apocalypse Now and a low-brow production of Hamlet. Rahman sometimes flirts too strenuously with surreality, but his comic precision restores balance. These stories are top-notch novelty acts, delightfully witty, quirky fun.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; First Edition edition (April 14, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374174016
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374174019
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 14.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,869,879 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Very similar in structure to Rikki Lee Travolta's "MY FRACTURED LIFE." This is a series of interconnected stories following the exploits of a fictional would-be B-movie actor as he sets off to become a "real person" in the "real world" only to find the world outside of Hollywood far more surreal than one might expect. Like "MY FRACTURED LIFE" each chapter can stand alone as a short story, but are expertly intermixed to tell one all encompassing tale. Although it lacks the dynamics and power of Travolta's fact-based account of the underbelly of Hollywood, fans of "FRACTURED LIFE" should be well entertained by Imad Rahman's "I DREAM OF MICROWAVES." A tandem, side by side read is probably the best bet for maximum enjoyment.
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on May 13, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Absolutely hilarious! I was laughing out loud! It reads like a Pakastani version of Rikki Travolta's send up of Hollywood would-be actors 'My Fractured Life'. Naming the actor Kareem Abdul-Jabar was so irreverant and nonsensical it couldn't be funnier! You will laugh out loud, I promise. It has the same kind of funniness as 'My Fractured Life' and 'Postcards From the Edge.' Absolutely hilarious!
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Imad Rahman borrows heavily from author Rikki Lee Travolta's life story "My Fractured Life" in his "I Dream of Microwaves."
Where Travolta tells of the tragically funny tribulations of starring in the so-bad-it's-good "Anne Frank: The Musical", Rahman places his B-movie actor hero in "Apocalypse Now: The Musical" for similar effect. In "My Fractured Life" Travolta tells of his short lived retirement from acting leading to a career in the "literary field" which translates to working at an adult video store. Rahman borrows the theme and places his retired B-movie star as a repo man recovering unreturned rented videotapes. And where Travolta's actor friend becomes oddly fixated on Edgar Allen Poe and begins speaking exclusively in quotations of the dead poet, Rahman creates a similar actor-friend character who speaks exclusively in movie dialogue quotation.
Imitations are rarely as good as the original, and such is the case here. However, while it won't replace "My Fractured Life" on 'Must Read' recommendation lists, it doesn't mean that "I Dream of Microwaves" isn't enjoyable. It certainly is a fine tribute to Travolta's writing.
Rahman uses Travolta's "My Fractured Life" as a jumping off point and has created a somewhat surreal but entertaining book.
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on May 24, 2004
Format: Hardcover
In the same tradition as "My Fractured Life", "I Dream of Microwaves" is a fun stomping of Hollywood's B-list subculture. If you enjoyed "My Fractured Life" and "Running With Scissors" you should enjoy this.
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Great book! The writing is very funny and nicely tied together. Similar to the book My Fractured Life, but more surreal. Still very funny.
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The thing that bothered me about I DREAM OF MICROWAVES is the same thing that I liked about it. You just can't get past the point-by-point way it follows the same story as MY FRACTURED LIFE. On the one hand this is what I enjoyed about it because it does cover the same territory so it was familiar to something I already enjoy. However it was also bothersome in some ways because I wanted something more than the main character being turned into a middle easterner and renamed after a basketball player. It is a nicely written book. I did enjoy it. However I did not enjoy it as much as MY FRACTURED LIFE because it didn't seem to add as much to the story as I would have liked.
Comment 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
If you like books like 'my fractured life' and 'running with scissors' you'll like this.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse