This title is not currently available for purchase
Imager: The First Book of the Imager Portfolio by [Modesitt, L. E.]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

Imager: The First Book of the Imager Portfolio Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 186 customer reviews

See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"

Length: 432 pages Audible Narration:
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration with Whispersync for Voice. Add narration for a reduced price of $9.95 when you buy the Kindle book.
Ready

click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Modesitt (The Lord Protector's Daughter) launches a trilogy set in a brand new world with this straightforward, exposition-heavy story. Apprentice portraitist Rhennthyl finds out the hard way that he has the magical ability called Imaging: an explosion kills his master right after Rhenn wishes for just such an event. Rhenn's ability, which allows him to form objects from thin air and slay with a glance, appears to be quite strong, and he begins training as a covert operative. Just when he starts to relax into his new career, an unknown assassin tries to kill him. This uncomplicated narrative feels like a prequel, with plenty of setup but not much action. Readers will look to future installments for the derring-do promised by Rhenn's martial studies and frequent mentions of stormy international politics. (Mar.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Rhennthyl, son of a wealthy wool merchant in the city of L’Excelsis, is a journeyman portrait painter, perhaps two years from becoming a master. One afternoon, his master is killed in a sudden fire, and Rhenn learns that he is an imager—that is, someone who can visualize things and make them real. He must join the Collegium of Imagisle, where imagers are taught and protected, too, because of the risk they run of unwittingly making their nightmares real. Though living apart from the rest of society, imagers do valuable, if secret, work for their country. Hence, they are prone, collectively and individually, to making enemies. Rhennthyl makes one early on, fighting a bully. Modesitt has drawn a world intriguing enough by itself and thoroughly integrated the magic of imaging into it. The characters are real people, learning and struggling and dealing with their families. Rivetingly beginning a new series, Imager Portfolio, this is thoroughly absorbing, whetting the appetite for the next installment. --Frieda Murray

Product Details

  • File Size: 4239 KB
  • Print Length: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; First Edition edition (March 17, 2009)
  • Publication Date: March 17, 2009
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0024NLMX0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,207,031 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By James Daniel on April 16, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
L.E. Modesitt, Jr., begins a new series in the same vein as Recluse. The parallels with Recluse are undeniable and formulaic, but they're also the reason that the Recluse series is successful. Remember, when we first read The Magic of Recluse back in 1991, a primary point of interest was introducing a system of magic without actually detailing how it worked, first. We discover, along with the protagonist, how it works, oh, so very slowly.

The same thing happens, here. We have a protagonist in a coming-of-age story. He doesn't fit in where he is, and his adventures consist of his finding his own way. I won't explain the magic, because that would spoil the book for those who are interested. Suffice it to say that it's very subtle, and the plot is suitably more subtle than those of the Recluse books.

Another large part of the fun in a new series such as this is gaining the flavor of a new imaginary world. This is almost-France in the Renaissance. A keen reader will recognize famous names, slightly modified, such as Descartes and Poincare. A strength of the author's approach is the detail with which he describes the environment, the food, the art, etc., giving the reader sufficient detail to imagine what the world is "really like." Of course, while such is a strength in the eyes of some readers, others will find this approach to be tedious and boring. If you like reading fantasy novels in order to explore a new world, this is right up your alley. If you prefer your fantasy to be more like Indiana Jones or Star Wars (the movies, not the mishmash of the extended universe), with fast-paced action without requiring much background detail, then you'll not appreciate this story.

Another forte of Modesitt's is the combination of magic and philosophy.
Read more ›
2 Comments 93 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This would be my first "review" in all my years as an avid reader of this genre (30) and is partially in response to the reviews by Taylor Rand and Damon Bradley. Their negative reviews ALMOST made me not by this book. But then I thought to myself, "Self, you have been reading Modesitt from the beginning and have not been disappointed. Buy the book!" I was not disappointed.

Rand writes: "...I thought Imager was a dull, plodding tale. The story, narrated by young Rhennthyl, an artist-turned-Imager spy, just creeps along with little beyond descriptions of food, philosophy, social structures and basic Imager rules. The protagonist is too colorless and detached to care much about. His reactions to events good or bad are pretty much the same: unemotional, impassive, impersonal..."

The above, only a small quote from the review, is such a poor, sweeping generalization of this work. If you are a true L. E. Modesitt Jr. fan and reader of his novels, Modesitt's style of writing, his attention to seemingly irrelevant detail, the thematic "coming of age" character portrayals, and the emphasis upon modesty in lands severely lacking this trait are just a few examples of why we read his books. I am specifically referring to Modesitt's novels that include the Recluse series, The Corean Chronicles, and the Soprano Sorceress. I have been reading these books since the early 90s, and I don't think I have been disappointed once.

As for Damon Bradley's review , it reads as follows: "This author is one of the most boring in SF/Fantasy today. The ONLY reason he is published is because he is a prolific writer. The characters in ALL his books are boring and two-dimensional, and are only there for the "storyline".
Read more ›
Comment 42 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Sadly (because I had high hopes for the series), I thought Imager was a dull, plodding tale. The story, narrated by young Rhennthyl, an artist-turned-Imager spy, just creeps along with little beyond descriptions of food, philosophy, social structures and basic Imager rules. The protagonist is too colorless and detached to care much about. His reactions to events good or bad are pretty much the same: unemotional, impassive, impersonal.

Rhenn does kill several people - accidentally or on purpose in self-defense (and for practice killing condemned prisoners) and it's of no more import than having to write an essay on jurisprudence or learn more Imager lore. It's all written in the same tone - whether Rhenn's just escaped an assassination or having dinner with his girlfriend.

(About the assassination attempts, there are so many - always stopped by Rhenn's mental shield - that they became humorous: Rhenn can't seem to stick his head outside Imager Isle without bullets whizzing by like pesky mosquitoes.)

Oddly enough though, the attempts on Rhenn's life aren't all that interesting even to Rhenn. He does ask around, at the Imager HQ's request, to find out who might be trying to kill him but he doesn't particularly change his daily routine. As for the Imager organization, they're apparently too busy imaging aluminum pots or whatever they do, to find out who's trying to kill Imagers every week. Or why would a very inexperienced Rhenn be conducting the investigation?

Even this lethargic tale sounds more exciting than it really is. Rhenn's days are spent mostly describing everything he's doing, eating, writing or thinking. It's really the author's way of tediously telling us this world's philosophy, magic, economics, social structure, foods, government, etc.
Read more ›
1 Comment 47 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews