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Imogene's Last Stand Library Binding – October 13, 2009

4.9 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 2—Imogene is a feisty child who loves history and spouts quotes from famous people on all occasions. When she discovers the now-abandoned Historical Society building in her New Hampshire town, she cleans it up and opens it as a museum. No one comes. Then one morning she finds a sign posted outside the building stating that it will be torn down to make room for a shoelace factory. Imogene tries to enlist the aid of the mayor and other influential people, but they all say that the factory will put them on the map. At the last minute, she finds a letter in the museum that was written by George Washington to indicate that he had slept there. She notifies a historian and then puts herself in a stockade on the porch as the wrecking crew approaches. Soon the whole town turns out to watch the spectacle, and people tell her to move. "'In the immortal words of the Vietnam War protesters,' she shouted, 'Heck no, I won't go!'" (There is no mention of the fact that the quote has been changed.) The President of the United States (an African-American woman) appears and declares the museum a national landmark. Illustrations done in pen-and-ink and digital media provide a lot of historical details and humor, featuring a determined child who rides in a sidecar on her father's motorcycle. This title could serve as a jumping-off place for some early elementary history lessons.—Ieva Bates, Ann Arbor District Library, MI END --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Starred Review, The Horn Book Magazine, November/December 2009: "With a light touch, complemented by Carpenter’s breezy illustrations, Fleming introduces rather than stresses these issues, making room for more thoughtful discussion but never requiring it"

Publishers Weekly, October 5, 2009: "Imogene’s passion and comedic perseverance inspire"

Kirkus Reviews, September 1, 2009: "Fleming peppers the text with famous quotes that add a layer of historical depth to the story"

Booklist, July 1, 2009: "Fleming’s sense of small-town space is impeccable; Carpenter’s pen-and-ink art enjoyably scribbly; and the historical facts and quotes that bookend the story are just the thing to get new Imogenes fired up."
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Library Binding: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Schwartz & Wade (October 13, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375936076
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375936074
  • Product Dimensions: 11.4 x 0.4 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,684,914 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you are a history buff, and like a strong girl character, this is a great book. My daughter loves the story and images, as do I. At the end of the book, there is more detail about the history behind some of the events and characters mentioned in the book. Highly recommend!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
what A beautiful book. I bought this for my 8 year old son. I think we forget that our young men need inspirational feminist messages too! He loves the story and understands more clearly what it means to be a peaceful political and social activist without hitting you over the head with the message.
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Format: Library Binding Verified Purchase
This book stands apart for it's story line and it's subject matter. It weaves history throughout in a humorous way and provides a great cross section of quotes. The story is compelling and empowering for children of all ages. You will root for Imogene and revel in her victory, a must have for any child. I plan on making this a staple of gift giving, what a great book!!! I cannot wait for my two year old to start shouting "The bulldozers are coming!" "The bulldozers are coming!"
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My 8 year old son and I just love this book. We've read it twice now and will be reading it again. Imogene is a determined patriot, whose love of history leads her to do amazing things. We particularly enjoyed the quotes she uses from famous people in history and were excited to read more about those characters. This book is one you need in your library. Every person, of every age can read it and enjoy it, because in the immortal words of my son, "Wouldn't it be great if everyone had at least a little Imogene in them?" Indeed it would. Bravo!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book for my 6 year old granddaughter because I was looking for stories about brave, smart girls. In 3 months, I would guess we have read it 50 times. She loves the quotes and often scolds me to say "Grandmom, "You must do the thing you think you cannot do!" Sometimes we digress as we read to talk about history, such as the Vietnam War and Paul Revere.
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Format: Hardcover
Liddleville, New Hampshire was one of those small towns that if you drove though quickly you'd never know you missed it. It was full of history, but the only person who seemed to know that was Imogene Tripp. It was said that her first words were "Four score and seven years ago," but maybe that was pushing it a bit. At any rate, she was passionate about history. Every opportunity she got in school, she was talking about history. She was soooo interested in it she even had to go visit the Liddleville Historical Society, a "centuries-old house stuffed with dusty antiques." It was, as her Daddy exclaimed when they opened the door, "a mess."

Imogene was so excited the only thing she could say was "Wow!" She cleaned and organized the cobweb-ridden mess and told her father that the "mess" was history "And in the immortal words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., `We are made by history.'" When she was finished cleaning and organizing the "history" of Liddleville she threw open the door (dressed in an historical costume of course) and waited for the crowds to come. And waited and waited and waited. Mayor I. M. Butz soon declared that the house would have to be torn down to make way for a shoelace factory. Money counted more than history. How on earth would Imogene convince the town and Mayor Butz that history was more important than shoe laces?

This Liddleville, New Hampshire tall tale gives the reader many American historical tidbits to think about. In Imogene's travels we get to take brief looks at Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, Jr., William Morris, John Paul Jones, Paul Revere, Teddy Roosevelt, Chief Joseph, Vietnam War protesters, Martin Van Buren and Eleanor Roosevelt. Imogene's little vignettes about historical figures may entice the young reader into learning more about them.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I just love this book and so do my children. Imogene is a really admirable heroine - she knows what she values and she calls on various historic figures to bolster her spirits as she tries to rally her town to support their historical society. The Black female president at the end is such a wonderful touch. Imogene doesn't give up in the face of ignorance and apathy. She's a terrific role model.
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Format: Paperback
I have a different take on this book than all the other reviewers, at this writing, who laud the fact that this is a positive story about a GIRL or that it gives snippets of quotes from randomly eulogized historical figures. It doesn't matter that she's a girl, and her quoting of a historical figure or saying doesn't add that much to the story. What is important is that this young girl, Imogene, is persevering and being clear-/far-sighted in fighting for her convictions--in this case, the saving of an old historical society building slated for demolition. When one has fervent convictions or a heart-felt goal one needs to be persuasive and determined when convincing others. The lesson I want children to get from this story is not famous-people references but the idea that one should pursue an important objective as arduously as possible. Even when reaching the goal may seem nearly impossible, ones persistence can be rewarded with success or--to be realistic, too--a near-alternative.

The Creative Teacher: Activities for Language Arts (Grades 4 through 8 and Up)
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