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Showing 1-7 of 7 reviews(1 star, Verified Purchases). See all 499 reviews
on September 17, 2016
Too much like trying to read a textbook.
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on August 9, 2015
Had to read this for a college class! Hated every minute of it and let the teacher know that.
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on March 26, 2015
Although the first third of the book provided a great review of how neural processing shapes perception and mental cognition, it then runs off the deep end with "it's not my fault, my brain made me do it" social commentary. Hardly worthy of scientific discourse, it assumes (without acknowledgement) that temporal awareness constitutes causality and that brain "abnormalities" underly all violations of social norms - irrespective of how those norms vary over geography or history.
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on November 12, 2014
In the first 150 pages Eagleman reviews some of the literature on automatic processes, nothing of which I didn't already know. But he does a nice job summarizing the research and findings.

In the rest of the book, 74 pages, Eagleman argues that because we have no free will, no one should be held responsible for his actions, not even murders and rapists. He lists some no-brainer examples of neurologically sick people who have done terrible things, such as a brain tumor causes a man to become a pedophile. Then he makes a sophomoric philosophical move, saying that normal mentally competent adults are no different, because all psychological states depend on brain chemistry.

Eagleman actually compares criminals, due to their brain states, being tempted into committing crimes to dieters, because of their brain states, being tempted into cheating on their diets. He says that if you can't be responsible for being tempted by chocolate cake, then criminals can't be responsible for being tempted to committing crimes. Eagleman believes these two conditions to be morally equal.

This is Eagleman's thesis: Because metaphysical free will and immaterial souls don't exist, no one is responsible for his actions. According to Eagleman's reasoning, he can't be responsible for writing a pointless and meaningless book because his actions are caused by his brain chemistry.

No one is accountable or responsible for his actions. What a heartwarming message from Eagleman!
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on September 24, 2012
I didnt like it at all it is so technical and so difficult to read nothing interesting.
I do not recommended for anyone especially if your English not the native language.
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on October 13, 2011
this book is absolutely wonderful. it explains all the issues most people experience in life. it also describes the reasons people do what they do and why. loved it!
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on July 27, 2011
This is a very low-level introduction to lots of basic facts known to anyone who has taken "Intro to Psychology" and "Introduction to Perception". Lots of the examples are right out of an Intro Psychology or Introductory Philosophy book. The author couldn't even find some fascinating things to say in his discussion about Sigmund Freud, who is certainly one of the most interesting characters in neurology and psychology ever. Just a mishmash of well-known findings and examples. Although the book is clearly written, I had to give up about halfway through. I kept falling asleep.
44 comments| 35 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse